Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling on all newspapers never again to publish articles by the journalist Mira Bar-Hillel following a spate of Jew-baiting tweets, culminating in today’s sickening mockery of the editor of the Jewish Chronicle, Stephen Pollard, for expressing concern over the danger COVID-19 poses to him due to his leukaemia and how the global pandemic is forcing him to come to terms with his condition.

Ms Bar-Hillel, who worked for the Evening Standard for 30 years, has over the past couple of months posted a series of appalling and incendiary tweets, including:

  • Suggesting that “the loudest Jewish voices demand a monopoly on the Holocaust”;
  • Replying to the disgraced Labour activist Rachael Cousins (also known as ‘Rachael Swindon’) to say that “Zionism” was going to take over the Labour Party;
  • Reiterating the claim that the Chief Rabbi and a prominent Jewish communal organisation are “staunch Tories”, a popular refrain for those claiming that prominent Jewish figures spoke out over antisemitism in the Labour Party due to a secret partisan agenda and scapegoating the Jews for the defeat of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party in the General Election;
  • Circulating the false claim that Israeli Jews were responsible for the tragic death of a boy in a well, who had in fact been drowned by rainwater;
  • Implying that the Jewish community is in fact selecting the Labour Party’s new leader and suggesting that the Jewish community is involved in a “purge” of “socialists” from the Party;
  • Stating that “lies” are the “stock in trade” of individuals and organisations fighting antisemitism in the Labour Party, redolent of the prevalent belief among some that Labour’s institutional antisemitism crisis is a ‘smear’;
  • Insinuating that the Government is avoiding criticism for its policies on the Coronavirus outbreak because it can hide behind claims of antisemitism against its opponents;
  • Saying that “The ultimate irony is that the top tip in the (forged) Protocols of the Elders of Zion [an antisemitic tract from Czarist Russia that purported to show that Jews control the world] was ‘control the means of communication’. So, in 2020, far from being (wrongly) blamed for EVERYTHING, Jews must now not – even if guilty – be blamed for ANYTHING on pain of non-platforming”; and
  • Stating that “Jews never liked schwartzes”, using a Yiddish term for black people.

Reaching the climax of her animus, Ms Bar-Hillel has now tweeted a response to an article by Mr Pollard in which he describes the effect of the coronavirus on his life-threatening cancer and emotional wellbeing.

As Mr Pollard expressed in raw and heartfelt terms the feelings of many others in the current ‘high-risk category’ who fear that COVID-19 may kill them, Ms Bar-Hillel responded: “So @stephenpollard, the self-appointed Supreme Arbiter of who is and isn’t a proper Jew, witchfinder general of antisemitic Jews and enabler of Boris’s landslide, is crying himself to sleep as he contemplates his demise. It would take a heart of stone not to rejoice.”

With such a record of spewing revolting and prejudiced bile, no newspaper should ever publish Ms Bar-Hillel again.

Please join us in reporting her Twitter account.

At yesterday’s Prime Minister’s Questions, which was Jeremy Corbyn’s last as leader of the Labour Party, Boris Johnson praised the Leader of the Opposition without referencing his antisemitism and the fear he instilled in British Jews.

The Prime Minister said: “I wish to pay tribute to [Mr Corbyn] for his service to party and country over the past five years in a very difficult job. We may not agree about everything, but no-one could doubt his sincerity or his determination to build a better society.”

It was deeply disappointing that Mr Johnson did not reference the terror felt by British Jews at the prospect of Mr Corbyn becoming Prime Minister, which, according to polls, could have led to half of the Jewish community in the UK fleeing the country.

Honorary Patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism and former Labour MP Ian Austin, who quit the Party in disgust at the growth of antisemitism under Mr Corbyn’s leadership, summarised the outgoing Labour leader’s legacy as “A party poisoned by racism. Jewish MPs driven out. The EHRC investigation….What a disgrace!”

Mr Austin was referencing the full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party launched on 28th May 2019 by the Equality and Human Rights Commission following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

After Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised the troubling behaviour of Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union (SU) new president-elect and demanded action, the SU has now announced that it will suspend the result of last week’s election and open a full investigation.

The information about the candidate was originally provided to Campaign Against Antisemitism by a concerned student.

Sam Farrell, the new SU president-elect, recently dressed up as a Holocaust victim for a “Movie and TV Show” themed night out and was seen in images posted on social media apparently in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps, with captions accompanying the images referring to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”. Then yet another social media post emerged in which he jokes about the billing for a club night saying: “pretty sure the Holocaust had better headliners”.

Mr Farrell went on to win the election last week and was due to become the SU’s new president. Mr Farrell had issued a lengthy apology, and the SU released a statement explaining why, despite learning of his behaviour in November 2019, it nonetheless permitted him to run as a candidate.

However, the SU has now released a further statement disclosing (extracted): “Due to new evidence [of Mr Farrell’s behaviour] coming to light and new evidence received by the University and the Students’ Union over the past 48 hours, new disciplinary action has also been opened. The Students’ Union will be fully transparent in cooperating with University counterparts in full should they wish to begin their own investigation, and the Students’ Union itself can confirm that it will be re-examining existing and new evidence as part of its new investigation. To be clear, the result of the SU Presidency election will be suspended until the result of any disciplinary procedure has been finalised.

“We do not underestimate the severity of this situation and the harm that the SU President-elect’s actions have caused.”

The SU will also be undertaking antisemitism training with the Union of Jewish Students.

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are very pleased that the SU has taken this step, and we will also be writing to the University to follow suit. Prejudice of any sort has no place on a university campus, and certainly not when it comes from a potential president of a students’ union. Jewish and non-Jewish students at Edge Hill deserve to be represented by someone who stands up for them, not someone who distresses them. It is right that the SU is taking this seriously, and we will continue to monitor the process to ensure that a suitable sanction is recommended and enforced.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

WHSmith has apologised for selling Mein Kampf and The Protocols of the Elders of Zion and immediately removed the books from sale.

The booksellers had been offering various editions of Adolf Hitler’s tome – apparently including the “Official Nazi Translation” and the “1939” edition – on its website, along with The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, a notorious Czarist antisemitic tract.

WHSmith now says that it has “strict guidelines on the books it sells, and it is against our policy to stock books which incite hatred. These books have been immediately removed from sale, and we are investigating how this has occurred with our wholesaler. We apologise sincerely for any offence caused.”

Recently, both Oxfam and Amazon removed the same books from sale in their respective online shops.

A teenager was seen urinating on the front doorstep of a Jewish family’s home while his friends looked on and laughed.

The incident took place yesterday on Oldhill Street in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD3535 23/03/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

(Image credit: Google)

After Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised how one of the candidates to become Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union president had recently dressed up as a Holocaust victim for a “Movie and TV Show” themed night out, more evidence has come to light of his mockery of the Holocaust.

Sam Farrell was seen in images posted on social media apparently dressed in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps, with captions accompanying the images referring to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”. Now yet another social media post has emerged in which he jokes about the billing for a club night saying: “pretty sure the Holocaust had better headliners”.

Mr Farrell went on to win the election last week and will be the Students’ Union’s next president and the face of Edge Hill’s student body.

The student who originally spotted the photographs and contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism complained to the university at the time and Mr Farrell was advised to remove the images from social media, but apparently no further action was taken by the university and he was permitted to continue to stand in the election by the Students’ Union.

She said: “I feel this is very insensitive, inappropriate and not someone who I want to represent my university if he feels it is appropriate to mock such a devastating event like the Holocaust.”

In a lengthy statement, Mr Farrell said (extracted): “Despite what my past posts may suggest, I do understand the severity of making light of events from history, especially when that history plays a fundamental role in reminding us of the needless persecution of others. I only hope I can convey how genuine I am when I say that I now realise how naïve and ignorant my past behaviour was. It was wrong, it will not happen again, and it should not have happened in the first place. I will not attempt to justify the behaviour by saying it occurred before I was nominated for SU President, but instead want to learn from past mistakes.”

The Students’ Union also explained that “As a Students’ Union, we take matters of this nature extremely seriously and when the individual’s actions were first brought to our attention in November 2019 we formally took disciplinary action to deal with his inappropriate behaviour. The student fully cooperated and apologised…and reiterated that it was not his intention to cause offence. He fully understood the severity of these accusations and was also given an appropriate disciplinary sanction following a thorough investigation. Since then, the student has tried to make amends and has engaged in lots of proactive initiatives to support his fellow students.

“Edge Hill Students’ Union made the decision that he should be able to run for any student officer position after carefully examining their Election Bye-Laws, which state that complaints can only be made against a candidate’s behaviour during the time that they are a candidate in the election. Taking these factors into account and adhering to the National Union of Students official guidance, the student was allowed to continue to stand in the 2020 Students’ Union Elections.”

Binyomin Gilbert, Programme Manager at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Sam Farrell clearly didn’t expect any repercussions from his grotesque attempt at humour, and sadly Edge Hill University has proved him right. The university’s failure to discipline him when the incident occurred means that now, as he becomes the face of its student body, Edge Hill has become synonymous with mockery of the Holocaust. The university’s inaction is unacceptable, and we shall be writing to the administration and the Students’ Union demanding his expulsion and to the Charity Commission calling for them to investigate the institutional failure to address this matter appropriately.” 

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

Campaign Against Antisemitism marked the United Nations’ International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, observed annually on 21st March, with a video and graphic for social media highlighting how, as COVID-19 spreads across the globe, the virus of antisemitism mutates to keep pace.

Remarkably, numerous Twitter users reacted to our meme – which showed how antisemites are using the coronavirus to attack Jews – by posting expressions of the very antisemitism we were calling out.

One user complained, “For goodness sake you stoop to this. Shameless,” while another responded with: “Isn’t the spotlight on the Jew for a while? Awww, your true colours come shining through, victimhood like yours is a real disease that is incurable. It’s not about the Jew, get over it.” Yet another user replied that we should “Rot in hell. And spare us with your damn “#UnitedAgainstRacism”…It’s you the bloody #Racist her,” while another said: “Nothing is beneath you Apartheidists.”

Today the Government said that it would establish a network of hubs around the country to cater to the need of those most vulnerable to COVID-19, and that those hubs would partly rely on the help of volunteers.

We have already witnessed the best of our country coming together as the NHS mobilises to treat those affected by COVID-19, as manufacturers divert their resources to designing and mass-producing ventilators, as retired medical professionals answer the call from the frontlines for help, and as scientists hurry to develop tests and vaccines.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is a volunteer-led organisation and many of our volunteers now find themselves at home with time and talents to contribute. We would be very pleased to hear from other charities or the Government as to how our volunteers can support the national effort. We have written to our contacts at 10 Downing Street to seek any direction from them as to how we can help.

Meanwhile, as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic intensifies, Campaign Against Antisemitism endeavours to continue our work as usual. We are in particular seeking to expose and silence conspiracy theorists who are claiming that the pandemic is the work of Jews.

We have taken internal measures to avoid exposing our team to risks, but our charity is built to be extremely resilient and we are lucky to be able to rely on extraordinary volunteers. Nevertheless, our fundraising is impacted and your support will be even more gratefully received than ever before.

In this precarious period for the country and the world, Campaign Against Antisemitism wishes everyone good health.

A religious Jewish man walking on Upper Clapton Road in Stamford Hill was confronted by a male youth asking him for £1. When the victim replied that he was not carrying any money, the assailant threw off the victim’s hat (worn for religious purposes) in laughter.

The incident took place yesterday at 16:10 and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD6529 19/03/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A woman who entered a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant in order to attract new members to the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action, has been found guilty of membership in the proscribed organisation following a retrial in Birmingham Crown Court.

Alice Cutter, who is 23 years old, used the name “Buchenwald Princess” to enter the online ‘National Action Miss Hitler 2016’ contest in June 2016, weeks after her now ex-partner, Mark Jones, visited the execution room of the Buchenwald concentration camp.

Ms Cutter was described as a “central spoke” of the banned group, exchanging hundreds of messages, including racist and antisemitic material, attending meetings with group leaders despite the ban, posing for a Nazi salute outside Leeds Town Hall in 2016 and attending a demonstration in York in May 2016.

Mr Jones is reportedly a “leader and strategist” of the organisation, as well as a former member of the British National Party’s youth wing. The court heard that he held “feelings of admiration” for Adolf Hitler and had a special wedding edition of Mein Kampf. He also gave a Nazi salute on his visit to Buchenwald’s execution chamber.

Also convicted were Garry Jack, 24, who reportedly self-identifies as a Nazi, and nineteen-year-old Connor Scothern, who was apparently a practicing Muslim and activist with the extreme anti-fascist group, Antifa, before joining National Action.

Another defendant, Daniel Ward, 28, pleaded guilty to being a member of National Action last year. He was jailed for three years.

The four convicted individuals will be sentenced at a later date.

West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit’s Deputy Chief Superintendent, Kenny Bell, said: “Being convicted of membership of this extreme right terrorist group is the same as belonging to other terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda or Daesh. They share a real toxic extreme ideology which is a danger to the public…This group was amassing weapons and recipes for bomb-making. They communicated through secret channels to recruit others to their cause. Left unchecked they presented a real threat to the public.”

(Photo credit: West Midlands Police)

Amazon has finally banned the sale of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf and other Nazi books in its online marketplace.

The e-commerce giant informed booksellers that they would no longer be allowed to sell Nazi propaganda on its website. Amazon told its partners that “they can no longer offer this book” as it breaks the company’s code of conduct. Kindle editions previously available have also been deleted, as has Hitler’s author page, which reportedly encouraged customers to follow for author updates and information on new releases.

It is understood that the ban on Mein Kampf may impact Random House and the Indian publisher Jaico, for whom apparently it has worryingly become a bestseller. It is being reported that different editions of the book have collectively had thousands of Amazon reviews, including many five star ratings.

Amazon has traditionally defended the sale of these books on its website on the basis of free speech and education, despite pressure to end their sale, but has now reversed itself without giving a reason.

Amazon has recently removed other antisemitic material from its website as well.

An Amazon spokesperson said: “As a bookseller, we provide customers with access to a variety of viewpoints, including titles that serve an important educational role in understanding and preventing antisemitism. All retailers make decisions about what selection they choose to offer and we do not take selection decisions lightly.”

A man shouted antisemitic abuse at Jewish passersby, yelling “all Jews look the same!”

The man also mocked the wig worn by an observant Jewish woman passing by, saying “bird like you with a wig”, and told passing Jewish men, “go to the hairdresser to cut your curls,” in reference to their religious Jewish side curls.

The incident took place yesterday at 17:30 on Oldhill Street in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD1504 19/03/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The British Government shares responsibility for antisemitism in Palestinian Authority school textbooks and society, MPs have said.

Speaking in a Westminster Hall debate in Parliament, new Conservative MP Jonathan Gullis, a former teacher, bemoaned the “environment of institutionalised radicalisation” that prevails under the Palestinian Authority and observed that school textbooks there teach children to count “martyrs” (a reference to genocidal terrorists killed attempting to murder Jews), that “Jews control the world”, and that Israel must and will be destroyed.

“As a former secondary school teacher myself,” he explained, “I know just how impressionable young minds are and the impact that such messaging can have on pupils’ development, values and worldview.”

Reacting to the educational material in use, Mr Gullis said: “Make no mistake: this is antisemitism, and we must condemn it as strongly as we fight antisemitism at home.”

Another new Conservative MP, Nicola Richards, observed the prevalence of Holocaust denial in Gaza and under the Palestinian Authority and that the curriculum “push[es] prejudice and division”, concluding that this “proves that something is going seriously wrong”.

Labour’s Steve McCabe MP said in the debate that the UK government bore “some of the responsibility” because aid from Britain “fund[s] the salaries of some 30,000 teachers and officials” in the Palestinian Authority’s school system. “Let us be clear,” he said: “we are paying the salaries of those who designed and administer the curriculum and those who teach it.”

One of the two candidates running to become President of Edge Hill University’s Students’ Union recently dressed up as a Holocaust victim for a “Movie and TV Show” themed night out.

Sam Farrell is seen in images posted on social media apparently dressed in striped pyjamas with a number appended, and wearing a cap, reminiscent of an inmate at Nazi concentration camps. Captions accompanying the images referred to “needing a shower” and “feeling gassed”.

The student who publicised the photographs complained to the university and Mr Farrell was advised to remove the images from social media, but apparently no further action was taken and he was permitted to continue to stand in the election.

She said: “I feel this is very insensitive, inappropriate and not someone who I want to represent my university if he feels it is appropriate to mock such a devastating event like the Holocaust.”

Voting in the election closed on 17th March and the results are due tomorrow.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sam Farrell should be expelled for his repulsive stunt. Someone who thinks the murder of 1.5 million Jewish children during the Holocaust is a joking matter at a time of rising Holocaust denial and antisemitism in Britain is clearly utterly unfit for any leadership position.”

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

A Labour councillor in Brighton and Hove has apologised for calling Israel a “racist” state and has resigned from her role as deputy housing chairwoman and rough sleeping chief pending an investigation.

Pictures have emerged showing Nichole Brennan holding a sign calling Israel a “racist, apartheid state” in a protest two years ago at Hove Town Hall against the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the local authority. The Definition lists “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour”) as an example of antisemitism.

Brighton and Hove City Council adopted the Definition.

In a statement, Cllr Brennan said: “I am deeply sorry for the pain this has caused to the Jewish community and I sincerely regret campaigning in this way…This happened two years ago, before I was a councillor. At the time I was not as knowledgeable about the [D]efinition of antisemitism as I am now. I do not seek to excuse my actions.”

She went on to say: “I have referred myself to the Labour Party and will fully cooperate with any investigation and have stepped aside from my role as deputy chair of housing and lead for homelessness and rough sleeping, pending its outcome.”

Cllr Brennan reportedly added that she now fully supports the Definition.

A spokesman for the Labour Party said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously. They are always fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures and appropriate action is taken.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

(Photo credit: Brighton and Hove City Council)

Michael Gove, the Conservative frontbencher, has accused the leader of the Labour Party of trying to “smuggle into our political conversation antisemitic expressions and antisemitic tropes.”

Mr Gove made the remark at a reception in Westminster for the Mainstream UK group co-founded by the former Labour MP and honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, Ian Austin, who quit the Labour Party in disgust at its institutional antisemitism.

Mr Gove, who serves as the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, observed, however, that the British people rejected Mr Corbyn’s views and what those “acting in his name had argued for.” Mr Gove praised Mr Austin’s “bravery” and lamented that the term ‘Zionist’ “has come to be used as a term of abuse. We can see the way in which anti-Zionism has mutated, so anti-Zionism has become the new antisemitism.” He noted that “in the past you could be Jewish in the ghetto, or you could be Jewish but had to suffer disability under the law,” and that “more recently, antisemitism has taken a new form. That new form is to say that that expression of Jewish identity…either has to be removed or Israel has to survive on terms set by others.”

He also warned the audience, which included the BBC presenter Andrew Marr, that Mr Corbyn’s retirement as Labour leader did not mean that “toxicity” would not persist in the Party, and also that “in the same way as some choose to stigmatise and vilify the Jewish community, there are others who are equally willing to use stereotypes to vilify other people who are British, who are our friends and neighbours.”

The cabinet minister added: “What we must do when confronted with hatred and prejudice is stand four square against it. Put whatever political boundaries we have to one side.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The poverty charity Oxfam has apologised for selling copies of the notorious antisemitic tract, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and has removed the book from its online shop.

The antisemitic work was originally published in Czarist Russia in 1903 and, having since been translated into multiple languages, is still popular in parts of the world today. It is a fake record of a fictitious meeting of a Jewish cabal discussing its control of the world.

Oxfam’s marketing of the book was noticed by Israel’s ambassador to the UK, with a 1936 edition selling for £100 and a 2002 version available for £12.99. Reportedly, the English translations books were priced, photographed and put online by volunteers.

Oxfam released a statement saying: “As soon as the books were brought to our attention we removed them from sale and they are being destroyed. They should not have been listed.  We provide guidance to our staff on items that are not acceptable for sale. We apologise for the error and offence caused. We will look at steps to take to prevent it happening again.”

The controversial filmmaker and Jeremy Corbyn enthusiast, Ken Loach, will not judge a Show Racism the Red Card competition after all.

Show Racism the Red Card describes itself as an anti-racism educational charity and appears to focus on discrimination and hate towards Black and Asian communities in the UK and does not appear to offer resources on antisemitism. Earlier this year, the activist group again became involved in controversy over antisemitism following an invitation to Mr Loach to join a panel of judges for a school competition on creative anti-racism designs.

The group’s chief executive, who has his own troubling history in relation to the Jewish community, described Mr Loach at the time as a “valued supporter” and he said that he could not “think of two people better qualified to choose winners,” in reference to Mr Loach and another controversial judge.

But today the organisation released a statement saying that it and Mr Loach “have together agreed that Ken will not act as a judge for the SRtRC School Competition 2020.” The statement reaffirmed that Mr Loach “has been a supporter, and advocate, of SRtRC for many years. He is a member of our Hall of Fame, in tribute to the work he has done over many years in combating racism and his support is greatly appreciated.”

The statement went on to disclose that evidence had been presented to the organisation of Mr Loach’s support via email for an appeal by Pete Gregson, a Labour activist, against his dismissal. Mr Gregson has been suspended from the Labour Party and expelled from the pro-Corbyn pressure group Momentum and from the GMB trade union after suggesting that the Holocaust was exaggerated and for abusive behaviour towards a female Jewish Labour member. Mr Gregson is the founder of Labour Against Zionism and Islamophobic Racism (Lazir) and was a guest speaker at an event organised by Keep Talking, a conspiracy theorist group that brings the far-right and far-left together.

The statement claims that Mr Loach “has since unequivocally denounced and rejected Peter Gregson for his antisemitism and behaviour, now that Gregson’s antisemitic behaviour and comments have been drawn to his attention. Ken Loach accepts a mistake in expressing support for Peter Gregson and in failing to contact the GMB prior to his reply to him…SRtRC and Ken Loach unreservedly support the GMB in the decision to expel Peter Gregson.”

However, although this revelation is implicitly a reason for Mr Loach’s withdrawal as a judge, the statement adds that “a significant factor in Ken Loach’s decision is the abuse online and in person that he and his family have received. It is profoundly distressing, and he is very concerned to protect those closest to him.”

Abuse is never acceptable, and Campaign Against Antisemitism hopes that Show Racism the Red Card is not suggesting that highlighting Mr Loach’s history of inflammatory comments on the subject of antisemitism and his consequent unfitness to serve as a judge in an anti-racism competition constitutes abuse.

Mr Loach’s voice has been among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss Labour’s antisemitism crisis as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign. He claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was subjected to a “torrent of abuse” that was “off the scale” and that regardless of what he did, the “campaign” of antisemitism accusations was “going to run and run”. He described the BBC’s Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism as “disgusting because it raised the horror of racism against Jews in the most atrocious propagandistic way, with crude journalism…and it bought the propaganda from people who were intent on destroying Corbyn.” He was also reportedly behind a motion passed by Bath Labour Party branding the Panorama programme a “dishonest hatchet job with potentially undemocratic consequences” and asserting that it “disgraced the name of Panorama and exposed the bias endemic within the BBC.” John Ware, the programme’s reporter, is apparently considering legal action against Mr Loach for his comments.

In 2017, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism. Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal. While speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after that incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

Mr Loach’s record should have been sufficient to disqualify him as a prospective judge in an anti-racism competition, and it is regrettable that further evidence of his disconcerting views had to come to light before Show Racism the Red Card reversed its decision to enlist him. Still, Show Racism the Red Card is at pains to defend and praise Mr Loach instead of cutting ties completely. Evidently, some types of racism are more tolerable than others.

Antisemites have wasted no time in blaming Jews for the COVID-19 outbreak or hoping that Jews are disproportionately impacted by it.

One commentator on Turkish television explained that “Jews, Zionists have organised and engineered the novel coronavirus as a biological weapon just like bird flu” in order to “design the world, seize countries and neuter the world’s population.” Some have claimed that the proof of Jewish involvement would be if Israel invented the vaccine.

An Iraqi political analyst has claimed that the novel coronavirus is an American and Jewish plot to reduce the world’s population.

A professor at California State University predicted that Israel would use the virus as an opportunity to put all the non-Jews in prison.

On Twitter, one user joked that the novel coronavirus is not as bad as the Jews because it does not kill children, a comment invoking the antisemitic blood libel.

Another user urged the President of the United States to use the virus as an opportunity to expel the Jews.

Others insisted that the Jews invented the virus or hoped that the cure would be pork-based in the belief that this might mean the Jews could not use it.

The notion that the Jews have a sinister role in global pandemics goes back at least to the Black Plague, when, during the period from 1348 to 1351, there were attacks on Jewish communities which were scapegoated for the epidemic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is monitoring for UK-based examples of such antisemitic conspiracy theories, the promotion of which would be very likely to constitute a criminal offence.

Despite the COVID-19 outbreak, Campaign Against Antisemitism is continuing our work as usual. We have taken internal measures to avoid exposing our team to risks, but our charity is built to be extremely resilient and we are lucky to be able to rely on extraordinary volunteers. Our ability to raise funds has been impacted however and we would be especially grateful for donations at this time. We wish everyone good health.

York is to mark the 830th anniversary of the city’s massacre of its Jewish community on 16th March at York Castle.

The anniversary of the ethnic cleansing of the city’s 150 Jews in 1190 will also be used to commemorate the Holocaust and will take place under Clifford’s Tower, where the massacre took place after the community gathered there seeking refuge from the belligerent townspeople.

The event is due to include music, readings and lanterns.

York council’s executive member for culture and communities, Darryl Smalley, said: “York is proud to stand with others once again, to raise awareness and commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day. We hope to see both residents and visitors join us at Clifford’s Tower memorial to show their support for York’s Jewish population.”

The massacre at York was one of a series of antisemitic pogroms in England in 1189-90 which also included Norwich and Lincoln.

The new chair of the Labour Party’s disputes panel does not believe that the Party has a problem of institutional antisemitism, even as her brother is suspended over antisemitism allegations.

Yasmine Dar, a councillor in Manchester and member of Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC), was elected this week to head up the Party’s disputes panel, which oversees its disciplinary processes.

Ms Dar has previously responded to the opening of an investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in May 2019 by saying that “I haven’t seen any evidence that this prejudice among a minority of members is an institutional problem” and accusing the independent body of “political point scoring”.

The EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party on on 28th May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Ms Dar, a longtime backer of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, who voted for her to chair the disputes panel, has also previously accused the “Labour right” of being part of a conspiracy to undermine Mr Corbyn, claiming: “Our Party’s bureaucracy was controlled by the Labour right until last year, who – recent leaked e-mails suggest – may have sat on antisemitism cases to destabilise Jeremy’s leadership.” She has also in the past expressed support for the Iranian Revolution, which brought an antisemitic genocidal regime into power.

Ms Dar’s brother, Majid Dar, has also reportedly been suspended from Labour over allegations of antisemitism, and there are concerns over the independence of the investigative and disciplinary process in view of his sister’s new role.

Ms Dar, a member of the unions Unite and Unison who also sits on Labour’s North West Regional Board, replaces Claudia Webb in the prominent role after Ms Webb, a defender of Ken Livingstone, won a safe seat in the General Election. Ms Webb was originally elected to the role in 2018 after her candidacy was proposed by Pete Willsman, another NEC member who has since been suspended. Calls to expel Mr Willsman have recently intensified.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The election of Yasmine Dar to replace Claudia Webb as the head of Labour’s disputes panel is another illustration of Jeremy Corbyn’s enduring legacy and shows not only that zero progress has been made in confronting the Labour’s institutional antisemitism but also that there is no will in the National Executive Committee to do so. Labour cannot possibly win back the trust of the Jewish community while it continues down this path.”

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Green Party co-leader and mayoral candidate, Sian Berry, has expressed her “frustration” that her Party has still not adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Speaking at a campaign briefing for the Jewish community, Ms Berry observed that motions to adopt the Definition have been placed before the Party’s conference twice, but blamed the failure to adopt it on other priorities for the membership. She also noted that she sponsored another motion for the Party’s Spring conference this month but that it was ruled “out of order”. She said: “That’s really frustrating to me because we didn’t get another chance to rewrite it to be in order. So it isn’t going to the current conference that we’re about to have in March.”

(The Green Party’s Spring conference has now been cancelled due to concerns over COVID-19.)

Ms Berry noted that she supported the adoption of the Definition by Camden’s local authority, where she is a councillor, and hopes the Greens will eventually do the same, as the Definition “gives you clarity on what is prejudice and where the line is”. She rejected the criticisms of the Definition on free speech, declaring them to be “unfounded”. “There is quite a lot of clarity in the definition,” she said.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes Ms Berry’s remarks, her support for the adoption of the Definition in Camden and her continued efforts to secure adoption of the Definition in her Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A leading journalist has revealed that Labour’s antisemitism crisis is so “toxic” that he feels he must declare that he is Jewish before reporting on it.

Robert Peston, ITV’s political editor, made the remark at the annual Cudlipp Lecture, saying that “in the current febrile political climate, it matters – and I say this with regret – that I am Jewish,” as he described the “toxic question of antisemitism in the Labour Party.”

Mr Peston, who is the son of a Labour peer (although he has not been a member of a political party since he was 24 years old) and who recently moderated the Labour leadership hustings of the Party’s Jewish affiliate, describes himself as secular, and explained that “I feel I have to say [that I am Jewish] – because although I strive to be as impartial in covering this issue, as I would a general election, or reporting on a corporate takeover, I cannot shed my Jewish identity in the way that I can cease to be a member of a political party or can dispose of shares in a company.”

He went on to explain that “there is an argument, that because antisemitism is a personal issue for me, I should not report on it,” adding that he is “someone who believes in the importance of impartial journalism.”

According to Mr Peston, Seamus Milne, Jeremy Corbyn’s head of communications, criticised his reporting, saying it had “not been remotely fair or balanced and included a high degree of slanted editorialising.” The “low point” was Mr Peston’s interview with the Chief Rabbi following his courageous intervention in the general election, which Mr Milne cited as a reason not to permit ITV news to interview Mr Corbyn, Mr Peston said. Mr Peston maintains that the interview was “impartial”.

Referring to the Chief Rabbi’s intervention, Mr Peston said that “this alienation of an important part of a British community could not be ignored, which is why I was surprised – to put it mildly – that Milne cited it when disqualifying me as a suitable interviewer of his boss.” He went on to ask: “Would Milne or any of us have qualms about a woman journalist reporting on gender pay inequality or a gay journalist covering gay marriage in the church? I doubt it. In a way it is extraordinary any of this needs saying.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

An investigation has found no evidence for the claim made by notorious antisemite and Holocaust denier Alison Chabloz that the court officer who handcuffed her told her that she shared her vile views.

In June 2018, Ms Chabloz was found guilty of breaching the conditions of a twenty-week suspended prison sentence. The sentence had originally been imposed following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism when Ms Chabloz was found guilty in a landmark precedent verdict on incitement on social media and on whether the law considers Holocaust denial to be “grossly offensive” and therefore illegal when used as a means by which to hound Jews.

In September 2019, Ms Chabloz was released from prison pending appeal, and the next day posted a message on the alt-right social media platform, Gab, saying of her arrest in court a few months prior: “The court warden who cuffed me was the same warden who cuffed me in 2017 at Chesterfield Immediate Remand Court. We recognised each other and I reminded her that she had congratulated [me] when I had been released two years ago, saying that I was simply saying what everyone was thinking but didn’t dare to say out loud.”

Ms Chabloz repeated the claim the following day in a blog post.

Later in September 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to Chesterfield Magistrates’ Court to investigate whether the claim about the court officer is true. GEOAmey, the firm that employs the officer in question, carried out an investigation and has now replied to Campaign Against Antisemitism to reassure us that employees “must not discriminate unlawfully against individuals or groups because of their racial group, religion or any other factor” and that such behaviour as that alleged is “not acceptable and will not be tolerated.”

Consequently, the investigator met with the officer in question in March 2020 and discussed the concerns. The officer “confirmed that she does recollect the female defendant” but “strongly denies the comments which have been falsely quoted as her words,” adding that “at no point did she ever agree with the opinions and racist views of the female defendant and in addition she does not and would never agree with such racist and antisemitic views.”

It is understood that the court officer has been employed with GEOAmey for several years, has an exemplary record and has recently completed the re-vetting process. Accordingly, the investigator concluded that she is “confident that the allegations are unsubstantiated.”

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are grateful that GEOAmey took our complaint about Alison Chabloz seriously and investigated the matter. We are unsurprised that the allegations made by the notorious antisemite and Holocaust denier about the court officer have been utterly refuted and that the officer in question is as repulsed by the suggestion that she shares Ms Chabloz’s views as we are. The investigation has found that Ms Chabloz’s capacity to falsify history is not limited to cataclysmic events in the twentieth century but extends even to recent trivial matters in her own life.

“Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to hold Ms Chabloz and her ideological allies to account, and will monitor with interest her appeal against her breach of the conditions of her sentence.”

An overwhelming majority of Labour members believe that the problem of antisemitism in the Party is either exaggerated or simply non-existent, according to a new poll.

The survey, conducted by YouGov for The Mail on Sunday, showed that 53 percent of Labour members believe that the problem of antisemitism in the Party has been exaggerated and 25 percent believe that there is no such problem at all – a total of 78 percent.

However, the Party remains beset with allegations of anti-Jewish racism.

Ian Murray, one of the candidates for the position of deputy leader, sent out a campaign email to all Labour members in which he noted his endorsement from the Party’s Jewish affiliate and stated his intention to “tackle the stain of antisemitism in our Party.”

In reply he received numerous abusive messages, including claims that “the Jews thought they owned the Labour Party”; that Mr Murray is a “Mossad agent”; that he is associating himself with “a bunch of war criminals and latter-day Nazis who are committing genocide”; that Labour’s Jewish affiliate is “a political racist movement” which “prioritise[s] their race or religion ahead the Labour Party”; that Mr Murray’s “true loyalties lie…firmly in the CIA-Mossad HQ in Tel Aviv”; that antisemitism was being weaponised; that Mr Murray was being “manipulated by a biased media, in the control of an elitist group whose vested interest is to maintain the status quo and their financial interests and neuter Labour opposition”; that “the antisemitism charge [against Labour] is a smokescreen to validate the Israeli Government’s [policies]”; and that Mr Murray “should be protecting the majority of our millions of citizens not just a few thousand of a small minority.”

Mr Murray has reportedly forwarded the abusive messages to the Labour Party.

A Facebook group supporting another candidate for deputy leader, called “Jeremy Corbyn Group supports Richard Burgon for Deputy Leader”, which has almost 23,000 members, is replete with antisemitic material, as activist Gillian Lazarus has uncovered.

In comments on a news article about Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis’ speech to the American political organisation, AIPAC, one member commented: “the chief rabbit [sic] needs to sod off to the vile apartheid state and take [Sir Keir] Starmer with him.” Others asserted that the Chief Rabbi is politically conservative, implying that his courageous intervention during the General Election was motivated by partisan concerns; as one commenter put it: “he’s a lying partisan duplicitous b******.” One member simply called him a “traitor”, while another called the Chief Rabbi a “killer of children” in a comment reminiscent of the medieval blood libel against the Jews. The comments go on and on holding the Chief Rabbi accountable for supposed policies of the Israeli Government.

Mr Burgon does not have any administrative involvement in the Facebook group, although he also has his own very troubling record in his relationship with the Jewish community.

Another Facebook group – that of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour – contained a comment suggesting that Labour leadership hopeful Sir Keir Starmer has “admitted he toasts the President of Israel every Friday evening” and therefore “I think we know where his money is coming from.”

Meanwhile, a Labour candidate for the Almondbury ward of Kirklees local council in the May local elections has reportedly been suspended by the Party after being accused of sending antisemitic tweets.

In tweets over the past two years, Paul Connolly apparently made reference to “Jewish hate mongers” and bribes from “the Israeli lobby”, but despite being reported to the Party a year ago has only now been suspended pending investigation.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A minor parking dispute escalated into an alleged antisemitic assault in Stamford Hill.

The victim, a shopkeeper, tried to drive into St Andrew’s Mews from Dunsmere Road, where he has private parking for his shop. He found the route blocked, however, as a grey car was parked in the driveway obstructing the gates, thereby blocking access.

The driver, reported to be a white male, was seen walking away from the parked car to visit the supermarket.

The victim therefore parked his own car in front of the other car in order to attend to his shop.

The other driver then returned and, finding his vehicle now blocked, entered the victim’s shop to demand that the victim move his vehicle immediately so that he could drive away.

The victim said that he kindly asked the driver: “Can you please wait two minutes until I finish serving a customer?”

The driver then allegedly pushed the victim and said: “Move your car right now, I will kill you, you F****** Jew, I will smash up your shop and your car.”

The victim was left in shock and traumatised by the incident, which took place on 28th February and was reported to the police by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4828 28/02/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

(Image credit: Google)

The Scottish National Party (SNP) is understood to be preparing to readmit Neale Hanvey, a candidate who was suspended by the Party during the General Election after his historic antisemitic social media posts came to light.

Mr Hanvey was the SNP’s parliamentary candidate for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the 2019 General Election, but during the campaign it emerged that he had posted antisemitic comments on social media in 2016, in one case comparing Israeli policy to that of the Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, and in another case sharing an image of the Jewish financier George Soros depicted as a puppet master controlling the world.

Upon the revelation, Mr Hanvey issued an immediate apology, recognising, importantly, how at least one of his comments breached the Definition and saying that he was “genuinely and deeply sorry”. Nevertheless, the SNP suspended him, saying: “Neale Hanvey is no longer an SNP candidate, and his membership has been suspended pending disciplinary action. All support for his campaign has been withdrawn.” Despite the impact that this suspension could have on the SNP’s chances in the marginal seat, the Party took swift action. Mr Hanvey remained on the ballot under the SNP’s name, however, because the deadline for nominations for electoral candidates had passed.

Local SNP activists continued to campaign for Mr Hanvey, however, despite the calls from Nicola Sturgeon, the SNP leader, for them to cease doing so and campaign for neighbouring candidates instead. Whether these calls were genuine or simply issued to appear to distance the Party from Mr Hanvey’s comments in the knowledge that the activists would ignore the calls anyway and help elect someone who appeared to be the SNP candidate is not known.

Mr Hanvey won the election but entered Parliament as an independent MP. He says that he has felt “tortured” by his punishment, has experienced an “internal moral panic” and is “earnestly trying to make amends”.

The SNP is now expected to readmit Mr Hanvey following a six-month suspension (dating from the original suspension rather than from his election) and on condition that he completes antisemitism training with a reputable antisemitism charity and meet with a Jewish representative organisation in Scotland to apologise.

Ordinarily, suspension pending investigation should not be treated as a sanction, but it may be in some circumstances and if combined with other sanctions or conditions. Moreover, it is significant that the social media posts were historic rather than current, and that, when it was pointed out, Mr Hanvey instantly acknowledged that his comments were racist and unacceptable and immediately and persistently apologised, and that the SNP took rapid action to suspend him and distance itself from his comments.

The SNP faced a deeper controversy when a Party official tasked with investigating Mr Hanvey on behalf of the Party was herself forced to resign after she described Israel as a “Nazi state”. It is likely that the Party therefore has more to do to eliminate antisemitism among its officials and members.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Different cases of antisemitism in politics will require different responses. The case of Neale Hanvey is instructive. When Mr Hanvey’s antisemitic social media posts were uncovered, he immediately apologised and has consistently shown contrition. When the posts were publicised, the SNP suspended him at once and its leader instructed local activists to cease campaigning for him (albeit that they continued to do so).

“Usually a suspension pending investigation should not be regarded as a sanction, but he began his tenure as an independent MP under suspension from his Party, will be taking antisemitism training with a reputable charity and will be meeting with a Jewish representative organisation to apologise.

“While we would rather that he undertakes the training before readmission, broadly-speaking this is a positive response from the SNP and hopefully will also show that an MP willing to listen and learn from his past prejudice can become a better legislator going forward. We applaud the SNP for its approach to Mr Hanvey’s case.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that 42% of British Jews have considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Antisemitism problems are persisting in the Labour Party, including in the capital, as a Haringey Labour Councillor has told Tottenham’s Constituency Labour Party to drop a “zero-tolerance” clause from an antisemitism motion it was debating. Meanwhile in Brent and Harrow, a defender of Ken Livingstone missed out on being selected as its candidate for the London Assembly by merely five votes.

Noah Tucker, who is a councillor on Haringey’s local council, proposed an amendment to a motion on antisemitism that would remove a clause in the motion that stated that the branch should adopt “a zero tolerance position” on antisemitism and that would remove another clause that provided that a failure to address antisemitism claims adequately “leads to a perception of complacency and collusion with antisemitism that is not without foundation”.

The amendment also stated that the Party’s disciplinary process should not be supervised by an independent organisation, and that “it is not antisemitic…to describe Israel, its policies or the circumstances around its foundation as racist because of their discriminatory impact”, an apparent reference to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which lists “claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour” as an example of antisemitism.

A spokesman for the local MP, David Lammy, said that he “unequivocally rejects this amendment and stands by the Jewish Labour members who spoke out against it in the meeting”.

Last year, Cllr Tucker, who was formerly the cabinet member for corporate services and insourcing until the position was abolished last year, reportedly defended the disgraced former Labour MP Chris Williamson.

Meanwhile, in Brent and Harrow, a controversial candidate — Aghileh Djafari-Marbini — narrowly missed out on being selected to stand for the London Assembly in the area, which is one of the safest Labour seats in the city. Ms Marbini received 619 votes, whereas her opponent received 624.

Ms Djafari-Marbini has been endorsed by John McDonnell, the Shadow Chancellor, local MPs Tulip Siddiq and Barry Gardiner, a frontbencher in Jeremy Corbyn’s Shadow Cabinet, and Apsana Begum, a controversial new Labour MP who accused Tony Blair of spreading “Zionist propaganda” and who claimed that the leaders of Saudia Arabia were “inspired by Zionist masters”.

Ms Djafari-Marbini has reportedly defended the former disgraced Liberal Democrat MP David Ward, who has a long history of commenting about Jews, the Holocaust and Israel. She also reportedly shared an article that defended the image over which the Labour MP Naz Shah was suspended and which she acknowledged was antisemitic, defended Ken Livingstone, and said that Labour’s antisemitism crisis is a “smear”.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A police officer has been arrested on suspicion of membership of a proscribed neo-Nazi terrorist organisation.

The extraordinary development took place yesterday at an address in North London, where the twenty-one-year-old officer with the Metropolitan Police was arrested and a search was carried out.

The suspect reportedly works in frontline policing, but the Police insisted that there is no threat to the wider public. The case will be supervised by the Independent Office for Police Conduct. The offence carries up to ten years in prison.

Only two neo-Nazi terrorist organisations have been proscribed. One is National Action, which was banned in 2016 following calls by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Then, last month, the Home Secretary, Priti Patel, proscribed the neo-Nazi Sonnenkrieg Division as a terrorist group as well. Sonnenkrieg Division is believed to be a Nazi Satanist violent sexual festish group that formed after a split with another neo-Nazi group, System Resistance Network, which is itself an offshoot of National Action.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to call for the proscription of System Resistance Network as well.

Amazon, the online retailer and marketplace, has come under pressure over the sale of Nazi propaganda books on its platform.

Among the books was an antisemitic children’s book authored by Julius Streicher, the Nazi publisher of the notorious Der Stürmer newspaper, called “The Poisonous Mushroom”, which was originally released in 1938. The book is reportedly available on Amazon in German, as well as English, French and Spanish.

According to reports, Amazon acknowledged the concerns raised but would not remove the books, stating that although it took the concerns “seriously”, nevertheless “we believe that providing access to written speech is important, including books that some may find objectionable”.

However, in recent months Amazon has withdrawn other books by authors espousing far-right views, including earlier this year, when it removed two books written by a Holocaust denier, including one that blamed antisemitism on the Jews and another that appeared to advocate genocide.

Lord Pickles has called for reform in the House of Lords after Jenny Tonge called Israel America’s “puppet master” and received no sanction.

The peer, who is the UK’s Special Envoy for post-Holocaust issues, has called on the authorities in the upper chamber of Parliament to “address the anomaly” that the disgraced Baroness Tonge, whom he described as a “Jew baiter”, can make an antisemitic statement in the Lords without censure.

Last week, Baroness Tonge described Israel as “America’s puppetmaster” in a remark in the House of Lords. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism, as is: “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism to characterise Israel or Israelis.”

In response, Lord Pickles said this week that he has “not the slightest doubt that she has breached” the Definition, adding: “It is shameful that the only place where Jew-baiters are immune from the consequences of their bigotry is the Chamber of the House of Lords. The House Authorities must address this anomaly.”

Baroness Tonge, who was suspended from the Liberal Democrats before eventually resigning, has a long history of Jew-baiting, denouncing Campaign Against Antisemitism, suggesting that the antisemitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue might be Israel’s fault, blaming Israel for a rise in antisemitism, and sharing a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition.

In December 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism joined 88 members of the House of Lords in condemning remarks on Facebook by Baroness Tonge following the general election, in which she commented: “The Chief RabbI must be dancing in the street. The pro-Israel lobby won our General Election by lying about Jeremy Corbyn.”

The controversial organisation, EuroPal, is scheduled to present a session on antisemitism at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London on 7th March, despite the group’s history of promoting an antisemitic conspiracy myth.

The event is part of a day long student workshop titled ‘Advocacy for Palestine on Campus’, hosted by SOAS’s Palestine Society. The particular session is intended to “[look] comprehensively at the ‘new antisemitism’ and how it has affected Palestine advocacy at large, and what it means for pro-Palestinian advocacy moving forwards.”

It is outrageous that EuroPal could be invited to deliver a session on antisemitism, given its own troubling history. The organisation is reported to have published and distributed a pamphlet containing antisemitic conspiracy theories once employed by the Nazis and since by modern-day neo-Nazis and white supremacists such as the KKK.

The pamphlet – ‘Basic Facts on the Palestinian Issue’ – promulgates the Khazar myth, which is a universally discredited, derided, offensive and decidedly unacademic theory that Ashkenazi Jews are descended from a nomadic people in Central Asia who converted to Judaism during the Middle Ages. The theory’s sole purpose is to delegitimise the right of the Jewish people to self-determination in its ancestral homeland. It is unconscionable for an organisation that holds antisemitic views to be allowed on campus by SOAS for the purpose of delivering training in antisemitism.

SOAS has in the past refused to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, despite growing concerns over campus antisemitism, thereby affirming the abysmal reputation of the university in the Jewish community.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “EuroPal has no place on a university campus. For such an organisation to lead a discussion on antisemitism is an insult to the Jewish community and to what is left of the integrity of the university, which is already known within the Jewish community as the School of Antisemitism.

“Time after time SOAS manages to fall short of the ever lower expectations accorded to it by the Jewish community. We are consulting our lawyers on measures we can take if this event goes ahead.”

Last year, the Equality and Human Rights Commission published a report showing that two-thirds of students who said that they had experienced racial harassment during the first half of the 2018/19 academic year did not report it to their university.

The former Universities minister, Chris Skidmore, has called on universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, with the Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick suggesting that public funding for institutions that fail to do so may be in jeopardy.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is currently raising a litigation fund, a major focus of which will be to challenge universities through legal action. Please consider contributing.

A man who called Jewish parents “dirty Jews” three times and attacked their baby in its pram has been found guilty of racially aggravated assault.

The incident took place in broad daylight in August 2019 when Adam Cassidy confronted the family outside a Costa coffee shop on a busy high street in St Alban’s, north of London. One of the Jews was wearing a kippah (skullcap). The altercation was filmed and the footage went viral.

Mr Cassidy, a twenty-year-old who according to media reports was raised in Egypt, apparently claimed in court that the victims had called him a “dirty Arab” first, but this suggestion was rejected. Mr Cassidy also kicked hoarding at the family.

The judge said to Mr Cassidy: “I don’t accept your evidence. I don’t accept that anybody called you anything. Whether it was an accident when you bumped into the buggy I don’t know. That doesn’t excuse what you did and doesn’t excuse your response. There are plenty of words you could have used if you just wanted to be rude; this was motivated by a racial motive. It was obvious that they were Jewish because of their skullcaps and for that reason you said ‘dirty Jew’ three times.”

He was found guilty of racially aggravated assault and of using an antisemitic slur.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We see more and more of this sort of casual antisemitism on our streets and it must be punished and deterred. This is a welcome ruling, but now the court must send a message of zero tolerance for antisemitism through an adequate and severe sentence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The frontrunner for the position of BAME (Black, Asian, Minority Ethnic) representative on the Labour Party’s ruling body has reportedly been suspended for posting an allegedly antisemitic cartoon on social media.

Mehmood Mirza, the vice chair of the West Ham branch of the Labour Party, was considered the favourite for election to the post on the National Executive Committee, but following a complaint back in October 2019 about a cartoon he posted on Facebook, he has now been suspended.

The cartoon apparently depicted a man wearing a headband with the words “free Palestine” who had a sticker with the word “antisemitism” placed over his mouth. The cartoon was drawn by the controversial cartoonist Carlos Latuff, an artist who placed second in Iran’s Holocaust Denial Cartoon Contest.

Some activists expressed disappointment that Mr Mirza was allowed to run at all, given the complaint had been lodged some time ago. Nevertheless, he received 75 local party nominations – more than any other candidate – and was backed by the TSSA union and the Labour Left Alliance group.

At least five candidates have been suspended over the course of the campaign thus far, namely Jo Bird, Mohammed Azam, Graham Durham, Mehmood Mirza and Keith Hussein, albeit Jo Bird had her suspension lifted.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Police have promptly removed Nazi graffiti from a McDonald’s in Kilburn.

A swastika was spotted at 18:00 on Saturday 29th February at the fast food eatery on the corner of Kilburn High Road and Victoria Road in London.

A passerby reported it to the Met Police and applauded the authorities for their quick response.

Anyone with information should contact the police on 101, quoting reference number: CAD/6699/29/02/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Labour Party has asked Facebook to ban left-wing antisemitic groups on its platform that support the Party.

It is understood that staff at the Party’s governance and legal unit contacted the social media giant last year to ask that eleven groups be moderated or removed because they contained antisemitic material.

The material is believed to include conspiracy theories about Jews, Holocaust denial and explicit expressions of anti-Jewish hatred.

In a meeting last October, Party staff handed over four reports containing hundreds of pieces of evidence to Facebook, and one of the groups, “Truthers Against Zionist Lobbies”, was shut down in December after an intervention by the celebrity antisemitism campaigner Rachel Riley. In a February meeting, the staff reiterated their request to Facebook and provided supplementary evidence.

The administrators are not believed to be current Labour members, although some may have been suspended or expelled by the Party.

In a statement, Facebook said that its standards “make very clear that there is absolutely no place for hate speech” on its platform.

The revelation comes as it also emerged that the largest Facebook group supporting the Labour leadership candidate Rebecca Long-Bailey is reportedly replete with antisemitic material.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The talent agency Money Management, which represents numerous celebrity clients, defended the use of an antisemitic caricature on its website, before apparently removing it.

The caricature, based on the Jewish character Fagin from the Charles Dickens novel, Oliver Twist, featured on the company’s website and apparently was also recently offered as part of an auction lot called “Antisemitism and Nazi propaganda”. It was also not lost on visitors to the website that the company’s name incorporates the word ‘money’ as well.

The company’s director defended the image, saying that he is a third generation Holocaust survivor and that he loved the Oliver! musical songs, including “You’ve got to pick-a-pocket or two”, which he noted was composed by a Jewish musician. He accused critics of having rushed to judgment.

However, the website now no longer appears to feature the image.

A Plaid Cymru activist who was suspended over antisemitism has been reinstated with no sanction and will even stand as a candidate for the Party in elections for the Welsh Assembly.

Sahar Al-Faifi was reported to have made antisemitic comments on social media some years ago, which Plaid Cymru intended to investigate during her suspension. Ms Al-Faifi deleted and apologised for the posts, but a Jewish organisation involved in the case considered her response to be unsatisfactory, as other social media posts that she was asked to amend apparently went unedited for some time, reportedly including one that linked the London Bridge attacks to “pro-Zionists”. After pressure she has now deleted them.

Following her reinstatement, in a statement Ms Al-Faifi disclosed that a Plaid Cymru panel found on 8th January that “there was no need for sanctions”.

She apparently also shared an article on her reinstatement from a highly controversial organisation which read: “While antisemitism must never be tolerated and should be challenged wherever it is found, the use of the term as a political tool for shutting down criticism of the Israeli government devalues the experiences of those who face antisemitic abuse on a daily basis.”

Ms Al-Faifi has even been enlisted as a candidate for the Party in next year’s Welsh Assembly elections in South Wales Central. At her launch this week, she was joined by former Party leader Leanne Wood.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It would appear that Plaid Cymru suspended Ms Al-Faifi during the general election in order to deflect attention and pressure when antisemitism was in the public life, but after the spotlight shifted has taken zero disciplinary action against her and has even rewarded her with a candidacy position.

“Clearly Plaid Cymru believes some forms of racism are welcome in its Party and that antisemitism has a prominent place in its vision for Wales.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Infiltration of a conspiracy theorist group has revealed a convergence of the far-left, including former Labour members, with the far-right, which come together to promote antisemitism.

Among those who have reportedly attended meetings of the Keep Talking group are:

  • notorious antisemite and Holocaust denier Alison Chabloz, who became a Labour Party supporter in 2015 and against whom Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a private prosecution subsequently taken over by the Crown Prosecution Service, resulting in a conviction and landmark legal precedent;
  • antisemitic conspiracy theorist, James Thring, who has apparently been linked to the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke and who spoke unchallenged about Holocaust denial at a Keep Talking event, claiming that no deaths were recorded at the Auschwitz concentration camp;
  • obsessive poster of conspiracy theories and founder of the secret Facebook group, Palestine Live, Elleanne Green, who is a friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (who was also a member of Palestine Live, which indulged in Holocaust denial and conspiracy theories that Israel was responsible for 9/11), who accompanied the disgraced former MP Chris Williamson to court when he brought proceedings against the Labour Party over his suspension in connection with belittling antisemitism, and who was suspended by Labour in July 2018;
  • suspended Labour member Pete Gregson, who was expelled from the pro-Corbyn pressure group Momentum and from the GMB trade union and suspended from the Party after suggesting that the Holocaust was exaggerated and for abusive behaviour towards a female Jewish Labour member, who went on to found Labour Against Zionism and Islamophobic Racism (Lazir), and who was a guest speaker at a Keep Talking event;
  • American-Israeli activist Miko Peled, who has said that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion,” and has compared Israel to the Nazis, in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism;
  • co-founder of Keep Talking, Ian Fantom, a 9/11 conspiracy theorist who has appeared at a Keep Talking event with Piers Corbyn, the Labour leader’s older brother;
  • notorious Holocaust denier, Nick Kollerstrom, who has reportedly described Auschwitz as “storybook gas chambers”; and
  • alleged Holocaust revisionist and former Labour councillor, Gill Kaffash, who was a former secretary of the Camden branch of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign.

The exposé was a years-long project by the Community Security Trust and Hope Not Hate.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long warned of the nexus between the far-right and the far-left. Our Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that Mr Corbyn was the candidate of choice for those holding antisemitic views and that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A new survey has found that a fifth of Europeans think that “Jews exploit Holocaust victimhood for their own needs” and that a Jewish cabal rules the world.

The survey was conducted by the European Jewish Association in December 2019 and presented at the organisation’s conference in Paris this week, at which Campaign Against Antisemitism participated. The survey polled a representative sample of 1,000 adults who were presented with 45 questions in face-to-face interviews in sixteen countries, including Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, the UK and Poland.

It is understood that the organisers found it difficult to find pollsters prepared to enter certain neighbourhoods, for example in Paris and Brussels, which was necessary to garner a representative sample.

According to the survey, a quarter of respondents believe that Israel’s policies make them understand why some people hate Jews; and more than a third believe that “during World War II, people from our nation suffered as much as Jews”.

The survey reportedly showed that Judeophobic antisemitic stereotypes and Holocaust revisionism were more common in Eastern Europe, whereas anti-Zionist antisemitic beliefs were more prevalent in Western Europe.

The former Labour activist who has been charged by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) after Campaign Against Antisemitism reported a leaked secret Labour dossier to the Metropolitan Police live on LBC has been named.

According to a source, Mohson Rasool, a 60-year-old from Hollybank Road, Birmingham, commented on Facebook that “We shall rid the Jews who are a cancer on us all [sic]”. He is also alleged to have suggested that the Jews should be sent into the Red Sea rather than expending expensive gas on them in what appeared to be an allusion to the use of gas chambers by the Nazis to murder Jews. Among other alleged remarks, he claimed that “hatred of Jews and Hindus is in my DNA”.

Mr Rasool is being charged with sending a grossly offensive message or other matter on a public electronic communications network on 10th February, 2018, in breach of section 127 of the Communications Act, and will appear at Birmingham Magistrates’ Court on 25th March.

It is understood that Mr Rasool had been expelled by the Labour Party prior to his arrest.

Of the ten cases so far referred to the CPS considered, five apparently remain under consideration, four will be dropped and Mr Rasool will be prosecuted.

However, it is understood that the four cases being dropped may have passed the threshold for lesser offences, but because the CPS took so long reviewing the cases, it is now too late to bring charges.

This is despite Lord MacDonald, a former Director of Public Prosecutions, saying last month that he believed that the CPS had had sufficient time to review the cases and should announce its conclusions, and that charges should be brought.

In a statement released yesterday, Gideon Falter, the chief executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, addressed this point, saying: “This sad tale exemplifies why two thirds of British Jews have lost faith in the CPS, which simply cannot be relied upon to bring anti-Jewish racists to justice. When the CPS has failed to prosecute antisemites in the past we have successfully instigated private prosecutions and brought judicial review proceedings against the CPS. We had hoped that these measures would not be necessary every time antisemitic hate crimes come before the CPS, but yet again we find ourselves having to consider our options with our lawyers in order to deliver justice for the Jewish community, because the CPS has failed us.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right. The research also showed that 42% of British Jews have considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics, and close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The disgraced peer, Jenny Tonge, has made yet another antisemitic statement, describing Israel as “America’s puppetmaster” in a remark in the House of Lords.

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is an example of antisemitism, as is: “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism to characterise Israel or Israelis.”

Baroness Tonge, who was suspended from the Liberal Democrats before eventually resigning, has a long history of Jew-baiting, denouncing Campaign Against Antisemitism, suggesting that the antisemitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue might be Israel’s fault, blaming Israel for a rise in antisemitism, and sharing a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition.

In December 2019, Campaign Against Antisemitism joined 88 members of the House of Lords in condemning remarks on Facebook by Baroness Tonge following the general election, in which she commented: “The Chief RabbI must be dancing in the street. The pro-Israel lobby won our General Election by lying about Jeremy Corbyn.”

The Metropolitan Police Service has informed Campaign Against Antisemitism that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) will only charge one of the Labour Party activists reported by Campaign Against Antisemitism over antisemitism.

The decision comes well over a year after Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chief Executive, Gideon Falter, referred an 86-page secret internal Labour Party dossier of evidence to Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick live during a radio phone-in on LBC.

Mak Chishty, a former Commander in charge of hate crime at the Metropolitan Police Service, reviewed the dossier on air and found 45 cases of antisemitism in it, classifying seventeen cases as “race-hate incidents” which should have been reported to the police. According to Mr Chishty and Charlie Sherrard QC, a criminal barrister who works with Campaign Against Antisemitism, at least four further cases warranted criminal investigation. Mr Chishty said the incidents were “abhorrent” and described the language used as “absolutely horrible.”

The cases included:

  1. an activist who attacked a Jewish Labour MP as a “Zionist Extremist” who “hates civilized people” and was “about to get a good kicking” for spreading “Zionists propaganda”;
  2. an activist who posted an article containing Holocaust denial and antisemitic cartoons of Jews from a blog claiming to provide “intelligent antisemitism for the thinking gentile”;
  3. a Party member posting that “we shall rid the Jews who are a cancer on us all” and that “these Jewish f***ers are the devils”; and
  4. a party member accused of physically and verbally abusing a seven-year-old boy using racist epitaphs including “Paki” and “Jew-boy”.

Following the analysis of the dossier by Mr Chishty and Mr Sherrard, Dame Cressida Dick, the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service, joined LBC’s Nick Ferrari for a phone-in. Mr Falter called in and officially reported the dossier live on air to the Commissioner.

Officers at New Scotland Yard then visited Mr Falter and opened a criminal investigation.

On 8th January 2020, Commissioner Dick reappeared on LBC and disclosed that six arrests had been made in the case in early 2019 and five files were passed to the CPS in September 2019.

The Commissioner explained that these cases represent a “very complex crime type” and therefore it was difficult to anticipate when the CPS would make a decision on whether to charge the individuals, based on whether there is sufficient evidence and if charging the offenders would be in the public interest.

The CPS has commented at the time: “We’ve received a file of evidence [from the Metropolitan Police Service] in relation to antisemitic hate crimes. We are reviewing this material to consider further charging decisions.”

Later that day, Lord MacDonald QC, the former Director of Public Prosecutions, intervened to say that he believed the CPS had had sufficient time to review the cases and should announce its conclusions, and that the evidence suggests that crimes have indeed been committed. He opined that “these are allegations about the conduct of members of a major political party and so there is obviously a strong public interest in this being resolved, and resolved as quickly as possible.” Moreover, he noted that a long delay fuels “rumours” and “unease” and therefore that “safe conclusions are needed sooner rather than later.”

Lord MacDonald went on to say that “the sensitivity in these cases is that prosecutors have to balance two things: one is the suggestion that these messages, these posts may comprise incitement to racial hatred, or other hate crimes, on the one hand, and then on the other hand, free expression rights,” adding that this “can sometimes be a tricky analysis but I should have thought that three months is plenty of time to come to conclusions in this case.” He observed that “there is some very extreme material here,” concluding: “This is very extreme stuff, which I’d have thought is well capable of comprising a criminal offence. Speech has to be pretty extreme to amount to incitement to racial or religious hatred but some of this speech does look to be very extreme indeed.”

The Justice Secretary, Robert Buckland, also commented, saying: “the very fact we are talking about it on national radio, and the importance of this issue — antisemitism as you know is a serious issue not just because of itself but because it is a gateway to other types of prejudice in my view — I very much hope that everybody involved in the investigation will do it thoroughly. Obviously, it has to be looked at properly, but that it can be expedited.”

However the CPS has now confirmed that of the ten cases currently under consideration, five remain under consideration, one will be prosecuted, and four will be dropped.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This case has received national media attention as part of one of the most explosive political issues of our time — anti-Jewish racism at the forefront of British politics. This is not complex. Labour activists posted extreme Jew-hatred on social media. The evidence is there in black and white. The evidence has been reviewed by the Commander formerly in charge of hate crimes at the Met and a former Director of Public Prosecutions. Yet the CPS dragged its feet for over a year, only now to conclude that it has charged just one solitary offender.

“This sad tale exemplifies why two thirds of British Jews have lost faith in the CPS, which simply cannot be relied upon to bring anti-Jewish racists to justice. When the CPS has failed to prosecute antisemites in the past we have successfully instigated private prosecutions and brought judicial review proceedings against the CPS. We had hoped that these measures would not be necessary every time antisemitic hate crimes come before the CPS, but yet again we find ourselves having to consider our options with our lawyers in order to deliver justice for the Jewish community, because the CPS has failed us.

“This unacceptable outcome shows that the CPS is not fit for purpose when it comes to prosecuting antisemitism. We therefore call for the CPS to treat antisemitic hate crime prosecutions as Special Crime, submitting junior prosecutors’ decisions to the scrutiny of more senior colleagues, and we urge the CPS to agree that its senior prosecutors receive training from Campaign Against Antisemitism and work with us to draft clear guidelines for prosecutors which link antisemitic acts to the corresponding offences, with worked examples for different kinds of antisemitic acts and evidential requirements. We have also sought a meeting with the Attorney General.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right. The research also showed that 42% of British Jews have considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics, and close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, has shamefully downplayed the antisemitism at the heart of the Dreyfus Trial in his advocacy of the controversial activist Julian Assange.

Mr Assange, who heads the Wikileaks website, is facing extradition proceedings to the United States after spending years in refuge at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

Referring to the trial of the French army captain, Alfred Dreyfus, who was wrongfully charged with espionage in the 1890s because he was Jewish, Mr McDonnell said: “I want to make it absolutely clear what my view is on this [Assange] case: I think this is one of the most important and significant political trials of this generation, in fact, longer. I think it’s the Dreyfus case of our age. The way in which a person is being persecuted for political reasons, for simply exposing the truth of what went on in relation to recent wars.”

Alfred Dreyfus was not persecuted for “political reasons” or for “simply exposing the truth of what went on in relation to recent wars” but because he was a Jew.

Defending his comments, Mr McDonnell insisted that “It was quite clear what I meant. Just like the Dreyfus case, the legal action against Julian Assange is a major political trial in which the establishment is out to victimise an innocent. On that basis, of course it’s right to assert that it’s a parallel.”

Joe Glasman, Head of Political investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “For John McDonnell to invoke the Dreyfus trial, one of the most heinous and consequential episodes of antisemitism in modern history, in order to promote his own foreign policy agenda, is utterly shameful.

“Yet again the Shadow Chancellor has managed to downplay antisemitism, this time not in his own party but in a historical event which is remembered not principally as a miscarriage of justice in a matter of espionage but because it was a concerted effort to malign a military hero simply because he was Jewish.

“There is a straight line between Mr McDonnell’s dubious reading of history and his sordid leadership role in an institutionally antisemitic Labour Party.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has proscribed the neo-Nazi Sonnenkrieg Division as a terrorist group. This follows the proscription of National Action in 2016, for which Campaign Against Antisemitism had called.

Last year, two teenage members of Sonnenkrieg Division were prosecuted, as the court heard that they had posted messages that threatened Jews, non-white people and others “perceived to be complicit in the perpetuation of multiculturalism”.

Sonnenkrieg Division is believed to be a Nazi Satanist violent sexual festish group that formed after a split with another neo-Nazi group, System Resistance Network, which is itself an offshoot of National Action.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to call for the proscription of System Resistance Network as well.

Ms Patel said: “Recent attacks here and in Germany have highlighted the threat we continue to face from violent extremism. We are working to keep the public safe by increasing funding for counter-terror police and strengthening the law to keep terrorists locked up for longer. By proscribing these groups, we are making it much harder for them to spread their hateful rhetoric.”

A school textbook has been removed from sale after research revealed that it included the question: “How could it be argued that the creation of Israel was a long-term cause of the 9/11 attacks?” It is understood that this is the only time Israel is mentioned in the entire book.

The history textbook, titled Understanding History: Britain in the Wider World, Roman Times – Present and designed for secondary school pupils aged eleven to thirteen studying history at Key Stage 3 level, was published by Hodder Education, an imprint of Hachette, one of the world’s ‘big six’ publishing houses.

The problematic question alludes to a popular nonsense antisemitic conspiracy theory that Israel or its intelligence services were somehow connected to or to blame for the 9/11 Islamist terrorist attacks.

The researcher David Collier brought the offending material to light, and the Hodder Education Group said on Thursday that it was removing the textbook from sale and would publish a revised issue.

In a statement, the publisher said: “We appreciate the phrasing of the question is not as precise as it might have been and we are very sorry for any offence this has caused.”

However, the fact that an antisemitic conspiracy theory could make its way into a textbook for children by a reputable publisher illustrates just how commonplace such anti-Jewish beliefs have become. Campaign Against Antisemitism calls for answers as to how the offending question was included in the book and what measures or training the publisher is taking to prevent the problem recurring in future.

The revelation comes as the Government pledged to act against textbooks in the Middle East funded by taxpayer money that encourage children to commit violent acts against Jews, using the language of genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations, and which are reportedly taught in classrooms by teachers who describe Jews as “pigs and apes” and call for them to be murdered, and praise Hitler.

A disabled Jewish lady who was using a buggy for support was attacked by a man who tried to kick the buggy away from her. The assailant had been walking alongside the victim for some time, who believed that she was targeted because she was Jewish and disabled.

The incident took place in Stamford Hill at 09:30 and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD7749 24/02/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The largest Facebook group supporting the Labour leadership candidate Rebecca Long-Bailey is reportedly replete with antisemitic material.

The We Support Rebecca Long-Bailey group currently has 6,683 members, apparently including the new Labour MP, Tahir Ali, who is one of only three sitting MPs not to have signed up to the International Definition of Antisemitism; three Labour councillors; at least one member of Ms Long-Bailey’s campaign team; and family members of the current leader of the Party, Jeremy Corbyn.

Among the problematic posts are that “Zionist Jews…do everything in their power to fight socialism”; that Israel “supplied ISIS, Al Qaeda, FSA [Free Syrian Army] with weapons and funding for years”; suggestions that Jewish organisations are “now running the Labour Party”; and references to “Labour’s fake antisemitism crisis”, “fake antisemitism accusations fomented by Israel” and “MI5 [who] conspired with right-wing Zionists to treasonously undermine free and fair elections.”

The social media group has numerous administrators but reportedly none of the posts had been deleted and the members who made the comments remained in the group.

The revelation comes as Ms Long-Bailey has been criticised for refusing to condemn a comment made by an attendee at a rally of hers referencing an “Israeli lobby”.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A passerby told an American Jew visiting the UK: “I hate you Jews, you are all full of bulls***, you f*** up the country – the only reason I don’t kill you is because I just got my British passport and I don’t want to lose it.”

The Jewish tourist was on the westbound platform of the Piccadilly Line at Green Park Underground Station, waiting for the train to Heathrow to travel home, when the incident took place. 

The victim was left shaken and jumped onto the next train to get away from the suspect, who was described as a 5”8 black male with a black beard and wearing a dark cap and a dark green jacket.

The incident took place at around 08:30 in the morning of Sunday 23rd February and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123. The offence is being reported to British Transport Police.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Labour Party has suspended another candidate for its ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) and a councillor over antisemitism allegations.

Graham Durham, a member of the Brent Central Labour Party and of the Unite union, told a rally for Rebecca Long-Bailey, a candidate for the Party’s leadership, that she was guilty of “cuddling up to…the Chief Rabbi, a well-known Tory,” for which he was cheered by others in the room. “We should not be allowing that,” he said.

Mr Durham has now reportedly been suspended (although earlier this week he apparently disputed this), which makes him ineligible to run for the NEC, despite his thirteen nominations from branches of the Labour Party across the country. Mr Durham also said earlier this week: “whilst anti-racist to my core, I did call the Chief Rabbi a Tory…are facts illegal now?”

The Chief Rabbi courageously spoke out against antisemitism in the Labour Party.

It comes after the “Jew process” councillor and NEC candidate, Jo Bird, was suspended for several days for a second time before her suspension was lifted, enabling her to continue her run for Labour’s top body.

Meanwhile, Labour has also suspended a Blackburn councillor alleged to have claimed that Jews created the ISIS terrorist organisation, a popular antisemitic trope.

Cllr Tasleem Fazal reportedly made a video during an anti-Israel protest in 2014 when he called peace protestors “murderers” and during which he was asked by a demonstrator wearing a skullcap: “ISIS – is ISIS Jewish?” From behind the camera, he responded: “Who’s created it? Who’s created it? Do your homework.”

In a statement, Labour said: “The Labour Party takes all complaints of antisemitism extremely seriously and they are fully investigated in line with our rules and procedures, and any appropriate disciplinary action is taken.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Chelsea football club intends to host a conference on antisemitism in conjunction with The Jerusalem Post newspaper, which will feature Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis and the Israeli ambassador.

Other proposed speakers at the March event, which will also cover bilateral ties between the UK and Israel, include the former Labour MP Lord Mann, who now serves as the Government’s independent advisor on antisemitism, as well as the parliamentary chair of Conservative Friends of Israel and senior Israeli politicians. The captain of Israel’s national women’s football team is also due to feature.

The event is due to take place at Chelsea’s Stamford Bridge stadium, and is part of the club’s “Say No To Antisemitism” campaign, which was launched in January 2018.

The club’s chairman said that the event could “further highlight the importance to tackle the rise of antisemitism we have seen across the world.”

The announcement comes only a week after undercover footage taken for a BBC documentary was reported to have shown supporters of Chelsea Football Club singing antisemitic songs, making gas chamber noises and performing Nazi salutes.

In January, Chelsea unveiled a mural dedicated to footballers who were interned in concentration camps, to mark Holocaust Memorial Day. The club has also adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

At the unveiling of the mural, Lord Mann told football clubs to enhance their efforts to tackle antisemitism and racism in stadiums, warning that “I have a voice and it will get more brutal if they don’t.”

The Labour Party has expelled a councillor who said that “Jewish leaders are worse than Nazis” after suspending him last month.

Andy Kay, who has also referenced “Zionists’ attempts to influence our political processes” and added for good measure that those supposed efforts were “racist”, had been serving as a cabinet member for finance and governance on Darwen Council in Lancashire.

Cllr Kay also wrote that “Jewish leaders are worse than Nazis” in 2014 in a post on Facebook that was reportedly ‘liked’ by Kate Hollern MP, who went on to become a Labour MP and Private Parliamentary Secretary to Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. She subsequently apologised.

In 2018, Cllr Kay also shared an article on social media describing Labour’s antisemitism crisis as a “blatant attempt to undermine Corbyn’s leadership”, adding the remark about Zionists. In the comments section of that post in a discussion about the International Definition of Antisemitism, Cllr Kay also said: “I was taught that Judaism was/is a religion, not a nation. In fact one of the tenets of Judaism prohibits the nation state… but I suppose that also depends on which wing of the fantasy you believe.”

Three days later, Cllr Kay reportedly shared an article that claimed that the Definition was “designed by Israeli propagandists to aid their many mass lobby attempts” and referenced the “largely-mythical antisemitism ‘crisis’ in the Labour Party,” which was described as “one of the few tools left to ailing and desperate establishment hacks wanting to smear Corbyn and maintain UK support for Israel.”

In 2019, Cllr Kay shared yet another article, which he described as “food for thought….. real thought!”, that portrayed Labour’s antisemitism crisis as part of a “disgraceful environment” of “disinformation and downright lies cooked up by those with vested interests and promoted by the billionaire offshore owners of the press and fellow travellers such as [the Jewish Labour then-MP] Ruth Smeeth.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The radio channel, TalkRADIO, has been fined £75,000 for breaching rules on impartiality in three programmes hosted by the controversial former MP, George Galloway. Two of the programmes concerned antisemitism in the Labour Party.

In assessing the breaches, Ofcom concluded that the programmes, one of which covered the poisoning of Yulia and Sergei Skripal, had “failed to preserve due impartiality on a matter of major political controversy or a major matter of current public policy”. Ofcom observed that “alternative viewpoints were only reflected to an extremely limited extent over the course of these programmes, each of which was three hours in duration”.

Ofcom further noted that “it was also the case that the limited viewpoints featured in the programmes which did not align with Mr Galloway’s were treated in a very different way to those that did.” For example, in the programmes on antisemitism, Mr Galloway apparently described one listener who expressed a dissenting view as “gutless coward”, “ignorant moron”, and “cowardly”. “These statements had the effect of dismissing and denigrating listeners who held views that did not reflect Mr Galloway’s,” Ofcom explained, “and constituted a clear difference in the treatment of such views.”

Ofcom found the breaches to be both serious and repeated, because the same set of rules were breached on three separate occasions over five months, and in two of the occasions in respect of the same topic.

The fine comes after Mr Galloway again courted controversy by falsely suggesting that “illegal Israeli settlers” had murdered an Arab child who was in fact tragically drowned by rainwater. At least one other broadcaster echoed the accusation.

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has published its list of new words for inclusion in its definitive guide to the English language in a January update.

Among the new entries are a disproportionate number of Yiddish words and phrases and others relating to Jews and Judaism, including: “anti-Semiticism”; “bagel”; “bochur”; “broigus”; “chicken soup”; “chrain”; “chutzpadik”; “farbrengen”; “Farkakte”; “futzing”; “glatt kosher”; “Japhetan”; “Jewdar”; “Jewfro”; “Jew-hating”; “Jewish American”; “Jewish-Christian”; “Jewish Christianity”; “Jew town”; “Jew York”; “Kvetching”; “kvetchy”; “Semiticist”; “Shabbat goyah”; “Shaliach”; “shticky”; “Unterfirer”; “yeshiva bochur”; and “yiddo”.

There are also numerous new sub-entries relating to Jews and Judaism, including “Hanukkah gelt”; “to make Shabbat”; and “shiksa goddess”, as well as new senses, including: “anti-Semite”; “bagel”; “chutzpah”; “kibitzer”; “kugel”; “kvell”; “kvetch”; “schlimazel”; “Semite”; “shtup”; “Yekke”; and “Yid”.

It is unclear why there is such a large number of words relating to Jews in this recent batch, and there is significant concern over the inclusion and definitions of certain words. In particular, there are concerns over the word “Yiddo”, which is defined as: “A Jewish person. Also in extended use: a supporter of or player for Tottenham Hotspur Football Club.” This definition fails to take into account the controversy over the use of this word and its pejorative connotation when used by rival clubs. Including the term in the dictionary without context may suggest that it cannot be an offensive term and may retard efforts to control its use.

These concerns arise not only because of the practical implications for policing racism in football, but also because the dictionary must reflect the word’s actual use, which is often in a pejorative context. By omitting this detail, the definition is deficient. Other definitions do note that a word is “usually derogatory”, therefore there is no excuse not to include a similar disclaimer for “Yiddo”.

Other words are also questionable choices, such as “Jew York”, which is defined as “A name for: New York,” again with no context; and “anti-Semiticism”, which is defined as “Prejudice, hostility, or discrimination towards Jewish people on religious, cultural, or ethnic grounds; = anti-Semitism,” despite the dearth of evidence suggesting that it is anything more than a mispelling of “anti-Semitism”, which in any event is preferably spelled “antisemitism”.

Oxford University Press, which publishes the OED, said in a statement that the word “Yiddo” is being labelled as “offensive and derogatory” and says it “will ensure the context for this connection [with Tottenham Hotspur and the Jewish community] is very clear” in the definition.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The purpose of new entries in a dictionary is to reflect how words have come to be used. If the Oxford English Dictionary feels that it must incorporate a word such as ‘Yiddo’, it must also note that its use is controversial and can be pejorative, especially when used by the supporters of rival football clubs. Omitting this detail leaves an inadequate definition that does not fully reflect how the term is used. Moreover, why there are so many words related to Jews in this recent update to the dictionary, including other derogatory terms that are not marked as such, is also disturbing. Campaign Against Antisemitism shall be writing to the OED on all of these points.”

A woman has been caught on CCTV performing a Nazi salute at shoppers in a kosher grocery store in Manchester.

In the video, which can be viewed below, the woman is seen passing by the shop, noticing the Jewish shoppers and stopping to perform an antisemitic gesture.

Greater Manchester Police have been notified.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The controversial Labour councillor, Jo Bird, has had her second suspension from the Party lifted within days, clearing the way for her to run for the Party’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC). She is apparently considered to be a frontrunner in the race to become a Constituency Labour Party representative on the NEC.

This was Cllr Bird’s second suspension from the Labour Party, and it came just days after it emerged that the Labour Representation Committee, a pro-Corbyn pressure group with a long history of belittling claims of antisemitism and publishing extremely disturbing articles and of which the Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, is President, was backing Cllr Bird to join the NEC. With her suspension lifted, Cllr Bird is now able to continue to stand as a candidate for the NEC.

Cllr Bird represents the Bromborough Ward on Wirral Council and has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended; supporting the expelled Labour activist and friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was thrown out of the Party after a confrontation with Jewish then-MP Ruth Smeeth; and worrying about the “privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.”

Elected to Wirral Council in August 2018, Cllr Bird is a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, and has described Labour’s institutional antisemitism as based on mere “accusations, witch-huntery and allegations without evidence”. 

Cllr Bird rejoined the Labour Party in 2015, when Jeremy Corbyn was running for the Party’s leadership, and last year she had previously been tipped to become a candidate to replace Dame Louise Ellman, a Jewish MP who quit Labour prior to the election due to antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Concerns have been raised following the appointment of George Eustice as the new Secretary for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, given Mr Eustice’s past scepticism toward Jewish religious slaughter, known as shechitah.

Mr Eustice has previously supported the labelling of meat that is not stunned before slaughter, which would distinguish ritually slaughtered meat, which is traditionally not pre-stunned, from other meat on sale. He has also called for a free vote for MPs on religious slaughter, saying: “There has been an alarming rise in the proportion of farm animals slaughtered without stunning and our regulations in this area are outdated. We are falling behind other developed countries.”

He has even proposed stricter quotas for kosher meat in the UK, as well as post-cut stunning, by which an animal is stunned immediately following slaughter rather than prior to slaughter, and claimed that this practice has “some rabbinical support”, a contention that has been disputed by communal groups.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “While we congratulate George Eustice on his appointment, his past stated positions on Jewish religious slaughter are deeply concerning to the Jewish community. We call on him to distance himself from past comments and reassure the Jewish community that he will safeguard this important expression of religious liberty.”

The Labour Party has reportedly expelled 25 members in a single day, as it tries to compensate for years of lacklustre disciplinary enforcement before the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) publishes its report later this year.

The EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party on 28th May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Following what the Party describes as “significant reforms” to its disciplinary process, it is also believed that Cllr Jo Bird has been suspended and Asa Winstanley resigned his membership after the Party launched its delayed investigation and began asking him questions.

Cllr Bird, who represents the Bromborough Ward on Wirral Council, has a long history of controversy relating to Jews, including renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”, for which she was suspended; supporting the expelled Labour activist and friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was thrown out of the Party after a confrontation with Jewish then-MP Ruth Smeeth; and worrying about the “privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.” Cllr Bird is a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, and was elected to Wirral Council in August 2018.

This is Cllr Bird’s second suspension from the Labour Party, and it comes just days after it emerged that the Labour Representation Committee, a pro-Corbyn pressure group with a long history of belittling claims of antisemitism and publishing extremely disturbing articles and of which the Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, is President, was backing Cllr Bird to join Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC). Cllr Bird had previously been tipped to become a candidate to replace Dame Louise Ellman, a Jewish MP who quit Labour prior to the election due to antisemitism.

Mr Winstanley, a far-left activist who called the Jewish Labour Movement an “Israeli Embassy proxy” and was reportedly suspended from Labour in March, pending an investigation, observed: “The manufactured ‘antisemitism crisis’ spreads from Labour to a state-backed McCarthyist witch hunt. It was a fatal mistake to indulge these lies, and indulge liars like John Mann.” Lord Mann was a Labour MP who quit the Party and was elevated to the House of Lords as the Government’s independent antisemitism advisor. Last September, Labour Against the Witchhunt, a group that was set up to protest the expulsion of Labour members for alleged antisemitism and that opposes “the false antisemitism smear”, hosted a public meeting with Ken Livingstone and Asa Winstanley.

Expelled members included Maureen Fitzsimmons, whose social media posts suggested that “Jews control everything” and referenced “corrupt Jewish puppet bankers”, and who continues to call antisemitism “the big lie”; Gavin Sealey, who supported notorious antisemite Gilad Atzmon (although it was unclear whether Mr Sealey’s expulsion was related to his expression of support); and Stephen Orme, who reportedly reacted to his expulsion by saying that “friends of Israel are a dominant and obsessive force”. Another member, Sharon Rothwell, reported that she had been suspended for “posting vids” by conspiracy theorist David Icke.

Elleanne Green, the founder of the antisemitic Palestine Live Facebook group, of which Mr Corbyn was a member, has also now been expelled from the Party. It has taken Labour two years since the views expressed in the group became public for Ms Green to face a sanction.

At the same time, it has emerged that, while Cllr Bird’s possible bid to join the NEC may fail due to her suspension, another troubling figure is a candidate to become the BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) representative on the NEC. Keith Hussein has apparently repeatedly described antisemitism allegations against the Labour Party as a “smear”.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The issue of antisemitism dominated the Labour leadership hustings in London yesterday, which was organised by the Party’s Jewish affiliate and moderated by the Jewish journalist Robert Peston.

In her introductory remarks, Dame Margaret Hodge MP, who is Jewish, said that antisemitism “hasn’t just penetrated the Labour Party but has chronically infected our Labour Party,” describing the last four years under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn as the most “miserable, challenging and lonely”.

She also highlighted how during this leadership campaign history was being “rapidly rewritten by those who are seeking our support,” noting that, despite the candidates making comforting statements now, as Shadow Cabinet ministers they were invisible “when we needed them most,” asking: “what did they actually do to force the leadership to act?” (Three of the four candidates sit in the Shadow Cabinet, with the fourth having served in the Shadow Cabinet for almost a year until mid-2016.)

Dame Margaret said that it was no good speaking up only in the “privacy” of Shadow Cabinet meetings and urged whichever candidate is successful to clean up the Party’s central office, including dealing with senior officials.

In their opening statements, all four candidates — Rebecca Long-Bailey, Emily Thornberry, Sir Keir Starmer and Lisa Nandy — pledged to implement the recommendations of the report that is expected to be published in the coming months by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) after it completes the full statutory investigation into Labour antisemitism that it launched on 28th May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Ms Long-Bailey observed how the Party’s antisemitism crisis had caused “palpable” “pain”, “anxiety” and “anger” in the Jewish community in Manchester, part of which lives in her constituency, and that it was “devastating” and “shameful” that Jews did not feel safe in the Labour Party, and apologised for it. Ms Long-Bailey later added that she spoke up on the issue of antisemitism, which elicited cries of “when?” from the audience, and admitted that “I should take responsibility” for not doing enough. “Could I have done more?” she asked rhetorically, before answering: “Yes”.

Ms Thornberry, whose husband’s family is Jewish, said that the Jewish community “wrongly” believed that a Labour government would have made them unsafe, but expressed her “disgust” that that is how Jews were made to feel by the Party. She later noted how a Jewish member of her staff reported that she could not go to family weddings and other occasions and publicise that she works for Labour, out of shame.

Sir Keir, whose parents’ family is Jewish, apologised to the community, saying: “I’m sorry that we let our Party get into the state that you lost faith in us,” and explained that “if you’re antisemitic you should be out [of Labour],” lamenting that “we’ve overcomplicated this.” He described dealing with antisemitism as “going to take time” but insisted that it is a “day one issue” for the successful candidate. He pledged that the test for the Party “isn’t about rules” but rather about whether the victims of antisemitism would feel comfortable to return: “I would not be satisfied that we’ve dealt with this unless people like [Jewish former Labour MP Dame] Louise [Ellman]…feel that they comfortably can come back”. Ms Thornberry agreed.

Ms Nandy declared about her Party: “We’ve lost all our moral authority”. Hers was the only opening statement that received strong applause, and it can be viewed here.

Mr Peston described the processes to deal with antisemitism in the Labour Party as “s***”, and observed that “this is a moral issue”. He went on to ask whether the candidates regard it as antisemitic “to describe Israel, its policies or the circumstances around its foundation as racist because of their discriminatory impact”, an apparent near allusion to one of the examples in the International Definition of Antisemitism. The candidates all appeared to affirm that it would be (or at least none demurred).

But Mr Peston then noted how Mr Corbyn had in 2018 proposed a “code” to the Party’s ruling National Executive Committee (NEC) to be adopted instead of the Definition, and the code deliberately diluted the Definition on points such as the example that Mr Peston had raised. Mr Peston described that episode as “an extraordinary moment” and asked: “Why wasn’t there a deeper reckoning at that point?”

Ms Long-Bailey replied that the Jewish community was meant to be consulted on the code but when it transpired that it had not been, she no longer supported it (she had been a public supporter of it at the time) and instead backed adoption of the full Definition.

Ms Thornberry said that she had supported the adoption of the Definition throughout, and when she tried to raise the issue of antisemitism more generally she was told by Party superiors that it “wasn’t my business” and was told to stick to her foreign policy brief.

Sir Keir said that he supported adoption of the Definition in public and private; argued for an auto-exclude policy for offenders and in particular in high profile cases such as those of the disgraced former London Mayor Ken Livingstone and disgraced former MP Chris Williamson; described the Party’s resistance to adopting the Definition as a “low moment”; called for an independent investigation and disciplinary process; and reported that there had been rows in Shadow Cabinet and that he and Ms Thornberry (but not, by implication, Ms Long-Bailey) had spoken up because the NEC was not dealing with the problem adequately.

Asked whether any of the Shadow Cabinet ministers had considered resigning over antisemitism, none of them answered, although Ms Nandy volunteered that antisemitism was a factor in why she chose not to return to the Shadow Cabinet after resigning with several colleagues in 2016. She also disclosed that she had considered her position in the Labour Party “every single day”. Ms Nandy also received thunderous applause for her complaint that the Party’s submissions to the EHRC have still not been disclosed by Labour to the leadership candidates or the Party’s Jewish affiliate.

Ms Nandy pointed out that the Party did tolerate not only antisemitism but, relatedly, also misogyny, as the most prominent Jewish MPs who were targeted over the past several years were women, and bullying, particularly with respect to the Party’s staff-turned-whistleblowers who featured on the Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism.

With regard to the reported defamation claims being brought by the Panorama whistleblowers against the Labour Party, all the candidates agreed that the cases should be settled, although Ms Long-Bailey added: “whether we thought what they said was factually correct or not.”

One phrase that kept being repeated throughout the hustings was how much the candidates had “spoken up” during the period of Mr Corbyn’s leadership. Discussion about actual action that had been taken over the past several years, however, was considerably more limited.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The full hustings is available to watch here.

The CEO of the charity Show Racism the Red Card is revealed to have a troubling social media history of belittling antisemitism in the Labour Party, whose antisemitic leader, Jeremy Corbyn, he openly backs.

Ged Grebby’s Twitter history includes the following posts, demonstrating a pattern of downplaying anti-Jewish racism — precisely the opposite sentiment that one might expect from the head of a charity that describes itself as an anti-racism educational organisation.

  • January 2015: Promoted an article by the journalist David Conn that criticised Campaign Against Antisemitism for sounding the “alarm” on rising antisemitism, claiming that raising these concerns would “risk seeming a little ungrateful” towards Britain. Mr Geddy described it as an “excellent article”.
  • August 2016: Tweeted that he is “Considering stopping my @guardian subscription over their massively biased coverage of #Corbyn.” The tweet linked to an article in The Guardian about comments by Labour MP Angela Eagle, titled: “Jeremy Corbyn’s failure to tackle bigotry has tarnished Labour”.
  • March 2018: Shared an article titled “As a Jewish Labour member, I’m sick of antisemitism being used as a political weapon against Jeremy Corbyn”, which dismissed claims of “a rise in antisemitic incidents” in the Labour Party as “tiring”, “frustrating” and “dangerous”. The notions that Labour’s antisemitism scandal was being “weaponised” or functioned as a “smear” of the Party’s leadership have been common tropes among deniers of Labour’s institutional antisemitism.
  • July 2018: Shared an article by the co-founder of the ultra-fringe Jews for Justice for Palestinians and the executive director of the highly controversial US-based group, Jewish Voice for Peace, which one leading Jewish organisation in the United States has said “gives cover to antisemites who couch their malice toward Jews as mere anti-Zionism”. The article was titled “As Jews, we reject the myth that it’s antisemitic to call Israel racist”. The article argued against the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the Labour Party and endorsed the movement to boycott Israel, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of Jews find intimidating. Mr Grebby described the article as an “important read”.
  • July 2018: A further tweet, captured by another user and, it seems, since deleted, also appears to have downplayed antisemitism in the Labour Party by agreeing with a series of tweets backing the infamous “code” that was floated by Labour Party insiders in 2018 as an alternative to the Definition in order to dilute it.
  • August 2018: Shared an article that wrongly claimed that the “[Definition] at heart of Labour row ‘will silence public discussion’, say minority groups.”
  • August 2018: Tweeted that “It is an absolute disgrace that #FrankField is using #Antisemitism in this way,” urging his followers to read an article criticising the backbench MP for observing in his resignation from the Labour Party that the Labour leadership was becoming a “force for antisemitism in British politics” and accusing Mr Corbyn of trying to “deny that past statements and actions by him were antisemitic”.
  • February 2019: Shared a letter that appeared in The Guardian titled “Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour is a crucial ally in the fight against antisemitism”, adding in his tweet the word “#antisemitism”. The letter, which backed Mr Corbyn against the concerns of the mainstream Jewish community, was signed by 200 Jewish members and supporters of the Labour Party.

In addition to his social media pronouncements, in 2019 Mr Geddy also appeared on a platform alongside individuals with their own worrying records, including Labour’s Richard Burgon MP, who said that “Zionism is the enemy of peace” and then lied about having done so, and Mark Serwotka, the General Secretary of the Public and Commercial Services Union, who suggested that Israel may have “created” the antisemitism crisis engulfing the Labour Party, as well as Anas Altikriti of the Muslim Association of Britain and Mohammed Kozbar, the Chair of Finsbury Park Mosque.

He also signed a joint letter with Labour frontbenchers and close allies of Mr Corbyn, John McDonnell, Diane Abbott, Labour’s Laura Pidcock MP and the Unite chief, Len McCluskey, and others.

Show Racism the Red Card has itself been involved in controversies over antisemitism as well, most recently when it invited the outspoken filmmaker, Ken Loach, to join a panel of judges for a school competition on creative anti-racism designs, despite Mr Loach’s own history of denying Labour antisemitism and his past refusal to denounce Holocaust denial. Mr Geddy described Mr Loach as a “valued supporter” of his organisation, which has included Mr Loach as a guest of honour in the past.

Some of Show Racism the Red Card’s sponsors are trades unions that have dismissed antisemitism in the Labour Party, and Show Racism the Red Card has also hosted Mr Corbyn at a panel at Arsenal. Mr Corbyn has also been featured as a promoter of Show Racism the Red Card’s campaigns, including by Mr Geddy directly.

It has been noted that Show Racism the Red Card receives a significant amount of funding from government departments and public bodies, as well as unions.

It is deeply disturbing that the Chief Executive of a prominent charity charged with educating against racism also downplays it and serves as a cheerleader for an antisemitic political leader who is unfit for public office.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is grateful for research from numerous activists and online monitors, which contributed to this report.

A Jewish family was told by a male passerby that he is “against Zionists” and that a “terrorist should come and stab you”.

The encounter, which took place on 10th February, saw the racist individual rantingly tell the family that “You should not come out because you supported Boris; the terrorist should come and stab you! I am against Zionists.” 

The incident took place in Covent Garden and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4120 10/02/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Recent developments in Labour’s leadership primary provide some insight into how candidates might approach the Party’s antisemitism crisis.

Rebecca Long-Bailey’s candidacy has polarised her colleagues, with some defenders of Jeremy Corbyn’s record, such as John McDonnell and Ian Lavery, endorsing her, while others are concerned at the prospect of her assuming the Party’s top job. One backbencher, Neil Coyle, has now suggested that such an outcome would mean that “Antisemitism will continue” and predicted further walkouts by MPs over the issue. Another MP predicted a split in the Party.

In a recent debate between the candidates, there was a suggestion that Ms Long-Bailey had not raised the issue of antisemitism in Shadow Cabinet meetings, but she denied this.

Lisa Nandy has published a document titled “Tackling Antisemitism: An action plan for our party”, in which she describes Labour antisemitism as “a crisis in the soul of our Party”. In the document, she pledges to implement the conclusions of the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Party, which was launched on 28th May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

She also wishes to reduce the threshold for suspensions from the Party; adopt a “new, independent” complaints process and personally introduce any necessary rule changes; ensure that there is “full transparency” in the disputes process; improve training for Party officials and members; and introduce a “zero-tolerance environment for those who hold antisemitic views, or deny the experience of the victims of antisemitism.”

Sir Keir Starmer recently secured the endorsement of the Labour peer, Lord Dubs, a Holocaust escapee and passionate advocate for child refugees. However, Lord Dubs brought his judgement into question and severely damaged his reputation when he attacked the Chief Rabbi for calling out Mr Corbyn’s antisemitism and defended the Labour leader in late 2019.

Sir Keir has also published his 10 pledges, the tenth of which makes reference to “Robust action to eradicate the scourge of antisemitism”, but without further detail and only in the context of mounting an “Effective opposition to the Tories” rather than, as apparently with the other pledges, because it is a worthy ambition in itself that is befitting to a once fiercely anti-racist party.

Emily Thornberry, the Shadow Foreign Secretary, travelled to Penzance to drum up support from the local constituency parties that she needs to nominate her. Despite her insistence that tackling antisemitism is the “most urgent and immediate priority,” however, she was happy to meet with Alana Bates, the former local Labour candidate who described claims of antisemitism in Labour as “manipulative smears” and recorded a song with her band that called for the destruction of the Jewish state.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Lord Mann has opined that “Jeremy Corbyn’s lack of action as Labour leader led to a growth of antisemitism on the Left,” adding that “there’s also virulent antisemitism on the Right.”

Lord Mann, who serves as the Government’s independent advisor on antisemitism, lamented that “not enough people are challenging antisemitism. We need to be more robust in standing up to it.”

He also noted that antisemitism was becoming the most acceptable form of racism and that society had a responsibility to tackle it. He urged politicians to address the climate in which people “feel confident” to make antisemitic remarks, noting too that it was a constant issue for the electorate during the general election.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Dominic Raab has controversially met with the antisemitic Prime Minister of Malaysia, Mahamad Mahathir.

The Foreign Secretary met with Dr Mohamad yesterday during a trip to the region to bolster economic ties.

Dr Mohamad has a long history of making appallingly antisemitic comments. 

In his 1970 book The Makay Dilemma, he wrote that: “The Jews are not merely hook-nosed, but understand money instinctively.” In 2012, he wrote on his personal blog that: “Jews rule this world by proxy.” He also notoriously boasted that: “I am glad to be labeled antisemitic…How can I be otherwise, when the Jews who so often talk of the horrors they suffered during the Holocaust show the same Nazi cruelty and hard-heartedness towards not just their enemies but even towards their allies should any try to stop the senseless killing of their Palestinian enemies.”

Speaking at the Oxford Union recently, Dr Mohamad was challenged about his comments about Jews, and he responded that: “We talk about freedom of speech, but yet you cannot say anything against Israel, against the Jews, why is that so? If we are free to say what we like, we can say something that is regarded as antisemitic by the Jews, that is their right, to hold such an opinion of me. It is my right to tell them, also, that they have been doing a lot of wrong things.”

Gideon Falter, the Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Dominic Raab’s decision to meet with Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, a vile antisemite, belittles our country and his august office and will be impossible to justify to the Jewish community. No policy goal is worth the price of fraternising with an avowed racist.”

The Jewish former Labour MP, Ruth Smeeth, delivered a blistering rebuke to candidates for the Party’s deputy leadership post at a hustings, telling them that when it came to antisemitism, “you did nothing”.

In fact, she even claimed that some of the candidates “shouted at me for raising” the scandal of antisemitism in the Party, as she lamented that one by one prominent Jewish women MPs in Labour were forced out, quit or lost their seat, with now only one remaining in Parliament.

Addressing the candidates – Angela Rayner, Dawn Butler, Richard Burgon, Ian Murray and Rosena Allin-Khan – Ms Smeeth’s remarked: “I find it very difficult and I’m looking forward to hearing other people’s comments on what they did or did not do over the last three years. But you know that I stood up at every Parliamentary Labour Party [PLP] meeting and called out antisemitism and asked for help. And I didn’t get any. In fact, there have been times where I was dismissed, where colleagues, including some of the people standing for election, shouted at me for raising those issues and shouted at me in my own office for raising those issues.

“And the idea that it should be Jewish women that have to lead this fight by themselves – because that’s what happened, with notable exceptions – is simply a disgrace. So I’m very interested in knowing where people were, I’m very interested in knowing why you were silent, I’m very interested in knowing why it was left to Luciana [Berger], and then me, and Louise [Ellman], and now Margaret [Hodge], who is alone, and for the people in this room, when I stood up at the PLP, when Louise Ellman was sent out and when Louise felt she had to go and said we were going to end up as Jundenfrei [free of Jews], and no-one did anything.

“So this is your responsibility to fix. But more than anything else, you did nothing, and you left it for people like me to lead that fight, and candidly, you should be ashamed.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

White supremacist posters have appeared on the campus of the University of Bristol as well as in Bristol’s town centre and in the city of Hull.

The posters, which read “It’s okay to be white”, are intended as a racist dog whistle and have been tied to an online group known as the Hundred Handers that encourages users to print and distribute the material.

The phrase was also described by the Bristol Students’ Union as “as a gateway into more serious conspiracies.”

A University spokesperson said: “The University of Bristol aspires to be a community where everyone should feel safe, welcomed and respected.”

In Hull, it was understood that members of the local council are now set to receive training on how to idenitfy white supremacist propaganda.

Similar propaganda has recently appeared in Edinburgh and Sunderland.

Nearly three quarters of Labour members said that the issue of antisemitism in the Party was “invented or wildly exaggerated by the right-wing media and opponents of Jeremy Corbyn”, according to a new poll by Lord Ashcroft. That number rose to over 90% among members of the pro-Corbyn Momentum group.

Nevertheless, most of those Labour members who held this view also thought that the Party’s leadership “should have done a better job of dealing with the issue.”

According to the report, only about one in five Labour members – and only 6% of those who voted for Jeremy Corbyn in the second Labour leadership contest in 2016 – agreed that “antisemitism was a real problem in the Labour Party, and that is why it got so much attention.” Conversely, one in four of those who backed Mr Corbyn in 2016 believed that the right-wing media and opponents of Mr Corbyn are to blame for the amount of attention that the antisemitism crisis received.

This view was echoed by members in focus groups, who made comments such as: “The antisemitism stuff was rubbish. There may have been the odd incident, but it was hyped, weaponised. Other parties didn’t get the same scrutiny.” Others noted: “[Mr Corbyn] should have said there’s no room for prejudice in the Labour Party, it’s not what we stand for, we’re going to have a really open, visible investigation and we’ll stamp it out – not do it all behind closed doors.”

Former Labour voters in the focus groups also apparently often raised the subject of antisemitism spontaneously. 

The pollster interviewed 10,107 adults in Great Britain online between 14th and 20th January and weighted data to be representative of all adults in Great Britain. 1,073 members of the Labour Party were interviewed online between 10th and 14th January. Focus groups of Labour members and former Labour voters were also held in January.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This poll makes for very worrying reading. In indicating that they believe that the issue of Labour antisemitism is ‘invented or wildly exaggerated’, an overwhelming proportion of Labour’s vast membership is effectively accusing British Jews of lying. These Labour members are likely to continue to influence the direction of one of the country’s two major parties and their views about Jews and antisemitism will fester in our politics for a generation. This is Jeremy Corbyn’s legacy.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

(Photo credit: Lord Ashcroft Polls)

Amazon has removed two books written by a Holocaust denier, including one that blames antisemitism on the Jews and another that appears to advocate genocide.

Amazon has stopped selling The Jewish Hand in the World Wars and the recently-released Eternal Strangers: Critical Views of Jews and Judaism Through the Ages, both written by an author who goes by the name of Thomas Dalton PhD.

The latter book’s blurb explains that “Jews are seen as pernicious, conniving, shifty liars; they harbor a deep-seated hatred of humanity; they are at once foolish and arrogant; they are socially disruptive and rebellious; they are ruthless exploiters and parasites; they are master criminals – the list goes on. The persistence of such comments is remarkable and strongly suggests that the cause for such animosity resides in the Jews themselves – in their attitudes, their values, their ethnic traits and their beliefs.”

The Jewish Hand in the World Wars expresses similar sentiments, apparently concluding by advocating for genocide against the Jews: “What shall we do? The path forward is quite narrow as Hitler understood. If we are to have any hope of minimizing future wars, we must stay the Jewish hand. Jews must be identified, isolated, sanctioned and removed from positions of power. In two short decades, an uneducated Austrian artist developed an unprecedented vision of national greatness, defeated the potent Jewish Lobby that for so long had ruled his nation, and guided his people to the heights of power. It happened once before. The blueprint still exists. It could happen again.”

The researcher David Collier described the book as a “169-page sewer of raw antisemitic hatred”.

An earlier book by the same author that was not available on Amazon – Debating the Holocaust – says in the introduction: “After considering all the evidence, I find that the revisionists have a very strong case.”

The books are all published by Castle Hill Publishing, which says it was founded by established by Germar Rudolf, a convicted Holocaust denier who served time in prison in Germany.

In a statement, Amazon said: “Our store maintains content guidelines for books that address content that is illegal, infringing or that we otherwise prohibit.”

A teenage girl brandishing a broomstick told Jewish boys on their way to synagogue on Friday evening that “no Jews are allowed to pass here.”

The incident took place at around 16:45 on Friday 7th February on the corner of Armitage Road in Golders Green and was reported by Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Undercover footage taken for a BBC documentary reportedly shows supporters of Chelsea Football Club singing antisemitic songs, making gas chamber noises and performing Nazi salutes.

The incidents reportedly took place in France in October 2019 on the day that Chelsea beat Lille in the Champions League.

The group of fans were chanting: “We hate Tottenham – Yids! We hate Tottenham – Yids!”. Two members of the group appeared to be making Nazi salutes.

In another segment, a supporter is seen on a train leading a different song about the Tottenham player, Martin Chivers: “Chivers was a Jew. The thing between his eyes was twice the normal size. Yiddo, Yiddo, Yiddo.”

Also on a train in Lille on the same day, fans are heard in the video hissing, apparently to imitate the noise of a gas chamber.

The clips were filmed in the making of a documentary titled Shame In The Game, which explores the persistence of racism in football.

The Club pledged to investigate “as soon as we are able to view the video” after it is broadcasted tomorrow.

This is not the first incident implicating Chelsea fans in behaviour of this kind.

Last month, Chelsea unveiled a mural at its stadium to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

A Labour councillor has reportedly been suspended for claiming on social media that George Michael’s music career was damaged by his opposition to “illegal wars by the Zionists”.

Lyn Boyd, who serves on the Durham County Council and is the cabinet support member for finance, was accused of promoting a “wide range of antisemitic tropes and far-fetched theories that you would expect from a far-right activist.”

Another Facebook post described former Prime Minister Tony Blair as “the perfect Zionist puppet”.

Yet another post linked to a video of a German Shepherd mauling a child, accompanied by a caption reading: “This is how the Israeli Zionist attack Palestinian children. You won’t see this in the mainstream media as they control most of it. Please watch and share.”

Other posts sought to downplay the extent of Labour’s antisemitism crisis and suggested that the claims of anti-Jewish racism in the Party were “complete rubbish and designed with one aim only. Ruining Corbyn and the party.”

Ms Boyd insisted that, although she would not seek re-election in 2021, she would “continue to campaign against any form of racism or antisemitic behaviour.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

(Photo Credit: Durham County Council)

The Education Secretary, Gavin Williamson, has observed that “there have been appalling incidents directed at the Jewish community at leading London universities.”

Mr Williamson made the remark in an opinion editorial in which he affirmed that if universities do not defend free speech, the Government will do so. His reference to incidents impacting Jewish students was in the context of noting how “activists’ threats are able to shut down events.”

For years Jewish students have seen their events diluted by university authorities or found fellow students and other activists imported from off campus disrupting the events with protests that sometimes even turn violent.

Last year, the Equality and Human Rights Commission published a report showing that two-thirds of students who said that they had experienced racial harassment during the first half of the 2018/19 academic year did not report it to their university.

The Universities minister, Chris Skidmore, has called on universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, with the Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick suggesting that public funding for institutions that fail to do so may be in jeopardy.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

A man with a history of browsing antisemitic websites who pleaded guilty in 2019 of possessing materials “likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism” has had his appeal against his sentence dismissed.

David Dudgeon was sentenced to two years in prison by the Edinburgh Sheriff Court, which reduced the sentence by a year from a three-year starting point, due to his guilty plea.

Mr Dudgeon then appealed to the High Court of Justiciary Appeal Court for the sentence to be reduced on the basis that the three-year starting point was “excessive”. That appeal has now failed.

Mr Dudgeon, who reportedly has a history of mental health issues, was referred to police in March 2019, following which his home was raided. Over the course of the investigation, it was discovered that Mr Dudgeon had an extensive browsing history of extreme far-right websites on topics such as antisemitism, Holocaust denial, racism, conspiracy theores and serial killers, desribed by the court as “violent, sinister and disturbing”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A controversial councillor is reportedly being backed to join Labour’s ruling National Executive Committee by the far-left group, the Labour Representation Committee.

Jo Bird, Labour and Co-operative Councillor for the Bromborough Ward on Wirral Council has previously been suspended from the Labour Party and given a formal warning, apparently after joking about renaming ‘due process’ in the Labour Party as “Jew process”.

Cllr Bird is a member of the sham Jewish Voice for Labour group and was elected to Wirral Council in August 2018.

The comments were reportedly made two years ago at a “Justice4Marc” meeting in support of expelled Labour activist and friend of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Marc Wadsworth, who was expelled from the Party after a confrontation with a Jewish MP Ruth Smeeth. According to the recording, Cllr Bird joked that the term ‘due process’ should be dubbed “Jew process”, drawing laughter and applause from the crowd of Labour activists.

Cllr Bird discussed allegations of racism and said that: “Seriously, one of the things that does worry me is the privileging of racism against Jews, over and above — as more worthy of resources than other forms of racism.”

Cllr Bird also came under fire for another part of the recording, in which she adapted the famous “First they came…” poem about the failure of European society to stand up for Jews during the Holocaust by German theologian and Lutheran pastor Martin Niemoller. Her distorted version said: “They came for the anti-Zionists, and I stood up because I was not a target, I stood up in solidarity. And then they came for the Socialists but they couldn’t get us because we were having a party, the Labour Party.” 

Rachel Riley, the television star and antisemitism campaigner, tweeted at the time: “Absolutely aghast listening to JVL’s Jo Bird, take a poem about the Holocaust, remove the Jews, to replace them with persecution of anti-racists and anti-Zionists.”

Cllr Bird also said that “privileging” antisemitism was “Bad for the many, as well as bad for the Jews,” a play on the Party’s “For the many, not the few” slogan. 

The disgraced former MP, Chris Williamson, is also heard in the recording.

Cllr Bird struck a similar tone on the issue in a Jewish Voice for Labour blog. She wrote that Mr Wadsworth’s expulsion was “unfair” and said ‘due process’ should be known as “Jew process.” The title of the blog was even “Jew Process.”

The Labour Representation Committee is a pro-Corbyn pressure group with a long history of belittling claims of antisemitism and publishing extremely disturbing articles. The Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, is its President.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Tom Pope, the Port Vale forward, has been charged by the Football Association (FA) over a tweet referencing the Rothschilds, and may face a sanction.

Responding to a request to predict the course of a hypothetical Third World War, Mr Pope tweeted: “We invade Iran then Cuba then North Korea then the Rothchilds [sic] are crowned champions of every bank on the planet – the end.” The tweet has since been deleted.

After being warned by other Twitter users that his tweet could be construed as racist, he said: “I mentioned them owning the banks which is fact and now I’m facing all this,” adding: “How is it racist?? Seriously is someone out to destroy me or what?”

It is understood that the FA has considered launching an investigation, as is Mr Pope’s Port Vale club.

Mr Pope has since apologised.

The FA said: “Tom Pope has been charged with a breach of FA Rule E3 in relation to a social media post on 5 January 2020.

“It is alleged that his social media activity breaches FA Rule E3(1) as it was abusive and/or insulting and/or improper and/or brought the game into disrepute.

“It is also alleged that his social media activity constitutes an ‘Aggravated Breach’, which is defined in FA Rule E3(2), as it included a reference, whether expressed or implied, to race and/or religion and/or ethnic origin.

“The Port Vale forward has until 12th February 2020 to respond.”

Mr Pope has already been banned for one match and given a fine in connection with other, unrelated “improper comments” on social media.

The Deputy Leader of the Green Party has apologised for tweeting an antisemitic cartoon depicting Israel and the United States as responsible for conflict and death around the world.

Amelia Womack shared an animated image of the Grim Reaper cloaked in an American flag and carrying a scythe emblazoned with the flag of Israel and dripping with blood going door to door – each door representing a country – bringing death.

Ms Womack accompanied the image with the caption: “When a picture paints a thousand words.”

She later deleted the tweet some hours later, saying “That’ll teach me for sharing things just as my battery dies on a train.”

The next morning she apologised, saying: “Yesterday I tweeted a picture which, in my ignorance, I thought was satirising U.S. Imperialism. It wasn’t, it was in fact antisemitic and I apologise wholeheartedly for tweeting it. I abhor antisemitism in all forms. There is no excuse for what I did and I’m truly sorry.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Worshippers at a synagogue in Stamford Hill, along with a family visiting a medical clinic in South London, were subject to antisemitic abuse in three separate incidents this week.

On 4th February, a group of youths threw eggs and fireworks at worshippers at a synagogue by Clapton Common, and on 5th February the same group climbed to the roof of the synagogue and shouted abuse at those attending.

Also on 5th February, a Jewish family visiting a medical clinic had a stone thrown at their car by three males. The incident occured on Marine Street in SE16 and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5236 05/02/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The activist group, Show Racism the Red Card, has become involved in another controversy over antisemitism following an invitation to the outspoken filmmaker, Ken Loach, to join a panel of judges for a school competition on creative anti-racism designs.

Mr Loach has a history of inflammatory comments on the subject of antisemitism. Mr Loach’s voice has been among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss Labour’s antisemitism crisis as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign. He claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was subjected to a “torrent of abuse” that was “off the scale” and that regardless of what he did, the “campaign” of antisemitism accusations was “going to run and run”. He described the BBC’s Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism as “disgusting because it raised the horror of racism against Jews in the most atrocious propagandistic way, with crude journalism…and it bought the propaganda from people who were intent on destroying Corbyn.” He was also reportedly behind a motion passed by Bath Labour Party branding the Panorama programme a “dishonest hatchet job with potentially undemocratic consequences” and asserting that it “disgraced the name of Panorama and exposed the bias endemic within the BBC.” John Ware, the programme’s reporter, is apparently considering legal action against Mr Loach for his comments.

In 2017, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism. Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal. While speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after that incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

Another invitee to the panel, Michael Rosen, is a former backer of the Socialist Workers Party who has also reportedly defended Jeremy Corbyn against charges of antisemitism.

The group’s chief executive described Mr Loach and Mr Rosen as “valued supporters” and said that he could not “think of two people better qualified to choose winners.”

Show Racism the Red Card describes itself as an anti-racism educational charity and appears to focus on discrimination and hate towards Black and Asian communities in the UK. It does not appear to offer resources on antisemitism.

The organisation has also itself hosted Mr Corbyn, along with fellow Labour Party frontbencher Emily Thornberry, at a panel at Arsenal.

Conservative MP Daniel Kawczynski has come under fire for attending a ‘national conservatism’ conference featuring controversial European politicians, including the prominent Italian politician, Matteo Salvini, Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orbán and Marion Maréchal of France’s National Rally.

Defending his attendance, Mr Kawczynski said: “ Clearly, Messrs. Orbán and Salvini are not to everyone’s tastes. But they represent serious ideas and concerns, some of which are shared by many citizens of the UK.”

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The polarisation of politics on the continent means that parties with hard right and hard left views are now part of the mainstream, as happened in the UK with the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn. It is important that the Conservative Party not be enticed by such views and those who espouse them.”

A school in Lincolnshire intends to edit its 95-year-old logo to remove its historic association with an antisemitic blood libel.

St Hugh’s School’s logo features a ball flying over a wall, which represents the story of ‘Little Saint Hugh’ who, in antisemitic folklore, was murdered by a Jewish family after losing his ball over their wall and being invited to retrieve it.

It is understood that the myth was known to the school’s founders, who wanted it to “remind [the] boys to maintain control, both of the ball and where they were allowed to play with it.”

The school’s new headmaster reportedly discussed the issue with the governing board and it was decided to remove the circle from the logo (representing the ball), retaining only the bricks “to reiterate the significance of the educational building blocks.”

The headmaster said: “As a school, we base every element of the education that we offer on fundamental British values and we hold dear the principles of mutual respect and inclusivity,” adding that the school cirrculum includes a visit to the National Holocaust Centre and Museum in Nottingham “which complements the work done in school in RE, PSHE lessons and tutorials” and stressing that “there is no place for discrimination of any kind” at the school.

Former pupils include the late television host, David Frost.

Activists from the Scottish National Party (SNP) have invited a controversial former diplomat, Craig Murray, to address them at an event in Edinburgh.

Mr Murray, a blogger and conspiracy theorist, suggested in March 2018 that Israel was more likely than Russia to have been behind the Salisbury poisoning of the Russian double agent, Sergei Skripal, reportedly writing on his blog: “While I am struggling to see a Russian motive for damaging its own international reputation so grievously, Israel has a clear motivation for damaging the Russian reputation.”

It is understood that Joanna Cherry, the SNP’s Justice Spokesperson in Parliament, will not be present at the event at the Party’s Braidburn branch to hear Mr Murray, a former ambassador to Uzbekistan who failed vetting to become an SNP candidate in 2014 apparently due to a “lack of a commitment to group discipline”.

A spokesman for Ms Cherry said that she planned to leave the branch before Mr Murray’s speech.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Urban Dictionary, an online crowd-sourced dictionary of slang words, has apologised for needless and offensive definitions of the word “Auschwitz” and related phrases, and has pledged to remove them, along with merchandise using the word.

The dictionary, which has been operating for over twenty years, contains more than eight million slang words and definitions and attracts some 65 million monthly visitors to the website, boasting 180 million page views. It functions as a platform for user-generated definitions, which are often tongue in cheek, however, its operators have readily conceded that numerous definitions of the Nazi concentration camp and related terms are needlessly offensive and should be removed.

Definitions of Auschwitz available on the popular site include describing it as “a summer camp for Jews – a Disneyland for its time”; “a place there are too many Jews”; “The happy resort for Jews during WW2”; and numerous references to flatulence.

Other terms include:

  • Auschwism”, defined as “when you’re getting roasted but you’re too socially awkward to respond”; “The hopes that all autistic people will go to a concentration camp (Aka Auschwitz)”; and “When a person is so autistic or stupid, they need to be gassed.”
  • Auschwitz burger”, defined as “when you put German bologna on Jewish rye and cook it in a gas oven”.
  • Auschwistic”, defined as “an adjective to describe someone so stupid they deserve to be put in Auschwits [sic]”.
  • Auschwitz diet”, defined as “a nutritional approach to losing weight, based on simply consuming less food.”
  • Auschwitz Express”, defined as “the 16:46 Central to Caboolture train, so name[d] because it is usually more crowded than one of Eichmann’s Auschwitz trains – although Eichmann’s trains generally ran on time.
  • Auschwitz Dining Hall”, defined as “another name for Ohio University’s Boyd Dining Hall located on the West Green. The nickname derives from the reference to the nutritionally void rations the Jewish prisoners of Auschwitz were fed under Nazi rule. Many students on West Green refer to Boyd as Auschwitz because, while Boyd is conveniently located in the center of West Green, it’s [sic] foods look just as bad, if not worse, than the food that was given to Auschwitz inmates.”
  • Auschwistic meltdown”, defined as “an autistic meltdown where you spontaneously combust into ashes.”

Further terms include “Auschwitz gas chamber”, “Auschwitz abortion”, “Auschwitz oven”, “Auschwitz pencil pusher”, and others, typically referencing flatulence, the use of natural gas or a sexual act.

Urban Dictionary also sells branded merchandise, including mugs, t-shirts and other items which carry the definitions on the website. Options include, for example, a £19 mug, £23 t-shirt or £36 sweatshirt marked “Auschwitz abs”, another of the related terms which the website defines as “a particular set of circumstances in which one has a deficient amount of body fat causing them to look like a Nazi concentration camp tenant.”

Responding to complaints about the terms and definitions, Urban Dictionary said: “Thank you for speaking up – we’re deeply sorry and honestly, we must do better. We encourage anyone to flag definitions that use hate speech.”

Urban Dictionary’s terms of service prohibits uploading material that is “detrimental to the quality or intended spirit”of the platform, and users are also able to report abusive or harmful content on the site, with entries deemed to violate policy usually removed within two days, according to the website.

When asked about the merchandise, Urban Dictionary provided a further statement: “Thanks again for holding us accountable. Every definition automatically generates options to print – we agree that it’s inappropriate for these items to be printed or even offered, and we’ve blocked the ability to do so. It may take 24 hours for pages to fully update.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Urban Dictionary for its pledge to act swiftly to remove the offensive material, and urges the operators to follow through.

The Labour Party has expelled a member who claimed that the Jewish TV personality and anti-extremism campaigner, Rachel Riley, “prostituted your religion” and was “poisoning the memory of your ancestors”.

Bob James, a Labour member from Wales, was suspended in March 2019 in connection with tweets about Ms Riley, including that “Judaism is a religion but what Israel does in the name of God is pure Satanic”; “I think Riley is using her influence as a popular celebrity to undermine the Labour party. Her method, though, using her Jewish heritage to promote self-interest, is appalling”; and “Riley has been open about her dislike of Corbyn… You have to hand it to the Tory party for getting her to risk her career for 30 pieces of silver.”

Ms Riley reportedly responded to ask: “Are you an official Labour spokesperson… or just a big cheerleader?”

Following the suspension, Labour’s National Constitutional Committee reportedly found him guilty of the charges and the Party has now expelled him.

Apparently, Mr James had also been subject to an earlier complaint over a social media post in which he claimed that “Israel is using the Holocaust as an excuse for murder,” but the Party reportedly concluded at the time that it was unable to identify Mr James as a member and therefore could not take further action.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to John Bercow seeking further information about his account of antisemitism in the Conservative Party.

Mr Bercow, a longtime MP who left the Conservative Party when he became Speaker of the House of Commons in 2009, revealed in an interview with The Sunday Times Magazine in the course of promoting his new memoirs, that he had been the target of antisemitism by fellow Conservatives.

He said that this took the form of mostly “subtle” digs at his Jewish heritage. He also provided an example, saying that “I remember a member saying, ‘If I had my way, Berkoff [sic], people like you wouldn’t be allowed in this place’, And I said, ‘Sorry, when you say people like me, do you mean lower-class or Jewish?’ To which he replied, ‘Both’.”

Mr Bercow added that “in 22 years, I never experienced antisemitism from a member of the Labour Party. But I did experience antisemitism from members of the Conservative Party.”

Mr Bercow also expressed remorse for his involvement with the controversial Monday Club, saying, “Here I was, a Jewish boy…sidling up to racists.”

However, Mr Bercow controversially intervened in Labour’s antisemitism scandal recently by defending the Party’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn, over charges of antisemitism. The Labour leader subsequently nominated Mr Bercow for a peerage which had not been granted to him by the Conservative Government. Mr Bercow’s nomination has raised concerns about Mr Bercow’s motives for defending Mr Corbyn.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Mr Bercow for further details about his experiences.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life, To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Sweden has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds this decision at a time of rising antisemitism in Europe.

The decision was announced by the Swedish Prime Minister in a newspaper article in which he wrote that “Sweden endorses the [D]efinition and the list of examples of antisemitism that serve as illustrations.” The article also outlined other steps that Sweden was taking to tackle antisemitism, which has reached worrying levels in his country.

The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Italy joins a growing list of countries to use the Definition, including Italy, France, Greece, and Cyprus, which recently adopted it.

Jeremy Corbyn’s Chief of Staff, Karie Murphy, has been deemed “completely unfit” for a peerage by the House of Lords Appointments Commission, which considers appointments to the upper chamber, after Mr Corbyn nominated her. However, the Commission’s conclusion was reportedly based on accusations of bullying rather than Labour antisemitism.

Ms Murphy is accused by staff of presiding over “a divisive and toxic culture” in the Leader of the Opposition’s office, including allegedly “berating” staff.

The bullying accusations are serious, including claims of physical assault.

It is regrettable that Ms Murphy’s leadership role in an institutionally antisemitic party and its campaign to make an antisemite prime minister did not appear to also form a part of the rationale for the recommendation not to award Ms Murphy with a place in the House of Lords. Mr Corbyn’s nomination of Ms Murphy was another insult to the Jewish community.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The antisemitic saxophonist, Gilad Atzmon, has withdrawn from his scheduled gig at the 606 Club tomorrow evening. The club had flatly rejected significant opposition to his performance by the Jewish community, until Campaign Against Antisemitism said that we would picket the venue on multiple future dates if Mr Atzmon was allowed to perform. Mr Atzmon said: “This morning I decided that in the light of the CAA’s threats, I am withdrawing from the gig.”

Mr Atzmon, billed as a “wonderful sax and clarinet player with a powerful sound and unique approach,” albeit one with “well-documented views on the Middle East that may provoke and challenge the listener,” had been scheduled to perform with his band at the iconic jazz venue tomorrow night.

However Mr Atzmon is a notorious antisemite. He was reported to have blamed the Grenfell Tower tragedy on “Jerusalemites” as well as reportedly telling university students that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving.” His antisemitism is so brazen that he told a Jewish Twitter user in 2014: “I am not a Jew any more. I indeed despise the Jew in me (whatever is left). I absolutely detest the Jew in you.”

Initially, 606 Club doubled down on its invitation to Mr Atzmon, despite his record. Its owner defended Mr Atzmon, reportedly saying that although Mr Atzmon “sailed way too close to the wind sometimes”, nevertheless “having just spoken to Gilad he insisted he’s not racist and went to great pains to say that he does not have an issue with Jews, of which he is obviously one, the religion or the culture.” The owner added that he had never heard Mr Atzmon speak pejoratively of Jews.

However, after Campaign Against Antisemitism warned 606 Club that it would picket future events there in order to publicise to its patrons the venue’s tolerance of anti-Jewish prejudice, Mr Atzmon has apparently decided to back out of the performance, stating that it was because of “CAA’s threats”.

606 Club announced that Mr Atzmon had “decided to stand down” in order to “protect the venue’s reputation”, adding that the club would “liaise with concerned parties while it investigates allegations” against Mr Atzmon, which it claims are “so far unsupported”. The club’s owner reportedly said that he was doing “more due diligence on the matter”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is appalling that 606 Club invited Gilad Atzmon to play yet again and then defended the decision even when confronted with his record of antisemitism which is well documented and well known. At a time when antisemitism in public life and on our streets is surging, it is disgraceful that the club resisted disinviting Mr Atzmon and apparently left it to him to do so under pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism.”

This incident is not the first time that Campaign Against Antisemitism has succeeded in preventing Mr Atzmon from being given a platform.

Following efforts by Campaign Against Antisemitism to have Mr Atzmon banned from various musical venues, he penned an article in which he claimed that the then-Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism “fabricated” antisemitic incidents as part of a “business plan” to defraud the British taxpayer and earn money for himself. After being sued for libel, Mr Atzmon attempted to crowdfund “tens of thousands of pounds”, telling his supporters: “I have made the decision to fight this crucial battle for freedom of expression even though this fight poses a real risk of bankrupting me and my family.”

Faced with the impossible task of substantiating these libels, Mr Atzmon instead capitulated and agreed to settle the case, admitting that all of the claims were false and agreeing to pay substantial damages and costs. Mr Atzmon did not show his face in court, instead sending his solicitor to read an apology on his behalf.

The Labour Party has suspended a councillor who said that “Jewish leaders are worse than Nazis” and referenced “Zionists’ attempts to influence our political processes”, adding for good measure that those supposed efforts were “racist”.

Andy Kay, who had been serving as a cabinet member for finance and governance on Darwen Council in Lancashire, has been suspended pending an investigation following revelations by the JC of his social media history.

Cllr Kay also wrote that “Jewish leaders are worse than Nazis” in 2014 in a post on Facebook that was reportedly ‘liked’ by Kate Hollern MP, who went on to become a Labour MP and Private Parliamentary Secretary to Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. She subsequently apologised.

In 2018, Cllr Kay also shared an article on social media describing Labour’s antisemitism crisis as a “blatant attempt to undermine Corbyn’s leadership”, adding the remark about Zionists. In the comments section of that post in a discussion about the International Definition of Antisemitism, Cllr Kay also said: “I was taught that Judaism was/is a religion, not a nation. In fact one of the tenets of Judaism prohibits the nation state… but I suppose that also depends on which wing of the fantasy you believe.”

Three days later, Cllr Kay reportedly shared an article that claimed that the Definition was “designed by Israeli propagandists to aid their many mass lobby attempts” and referenced the “largely-mythical antisemitism ‘crisis’ in the Labour Party,” which was described as “one of the few tools left to ailing and desperate establishment hacks wanting to smear Corbyn and maintain UK support for Israel.”

In 2019, Cllr Kay shared yet another article, which he described as “food for thought….. real thought!”, that portrayed Labour’s antisemitism crisis as part of a “disgraceful environment” of “disinformation and downright lies cooked up by those with vested interests and promoted by the billionaire offshore owners of the press and fellow travellers such as [the Jewish Labour then-MP] Ruth Smeeth.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

A general election candidate suspended by the Scottish Conservative Party is still a councillor for the Party on Aberdeen City Council.

Ryan Houghton, had been the Conservatives’ candidate for Aberdeen North until it was discovered that he had written on a martial arts forum seven years ago, under the psedonym Razgriz, that although there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” nevertheless “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.”

He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Houghton was suspended as a candidate by the Party, albeit that he remained on the ballot because his nomination papers were already submitted, but he no longer represented the Conservative Party, which withdrew support for him.

However, Mr Houghton still serves on the council as business manager and vice-convener of the staff governance committee. An attempt to remove him from the position reportedly failed when Conservative and Labour councillors joined forces to vote it down.

The Conservative group leader and co-leader of the council, Douglas Lumsden said that Mr Houghton was “innocent until proven guilty,” adding: “I think it would be wrong for us to remove someone from their role when these are just accusations at present and they’re being investigated by the party. The Conservative Party takes things very seriously and there is a full investigation taking place.”

The Labour MP, Afzal Khan, who claimed that he was “mortified” for “accidentally” sharing an antisemitic social media post, nonetheless did not remove the post for six months after apologising.

Mr Khan, who serves as the Shadow Immigration Minister, said that he was “sincerely sorry about this genuine accident” when it was revealed last year that he had shared a post referencing an “Israel-British-Swiss-Rothschilds crime syndicate” and “mass murdering Rothschilds Israeli mafia criminal liars” on Facebook in 2015. But only after being asked by The Telegraph in the past few days as to why it remained on his Facebook page was it removed.

Mr Khan was recently confronted by Gideon Falter of Campaign Against Antisemitism at a Chanukah party over his record, eventually leading to Mr Khan’s exit from the party.

During the 2017 general election, Mr Khan was criticised for sharing a comment on Twitter stating that “The Israeli government are acting like Nazi’s [sic] in Gaza.” The common breached the International Definition of Antisemitism, which lists “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” as an example of antisemitism.

The words apparently derived from the headline of a blog post that Mr Khan was sharing. Of that incident, he said: “I did not then — nor do I now — endorse the content of the article I tweeted. I have a long track record of fighting racism, including antisemitism. I was new to Twitter and made a mistake, which I apologised for.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Jewish pedestrians were abused by a woman screaming ““F*** Jews, I will kill all Jews.”

The incident occurred at 14:30 on 30th January in Stamford Hill, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The suspect then reportedly entered number 31 Stamford Hill. Police are investigating.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD3619 30/01/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Len McCluskey, the head of the powerful Unite union, has claimed that antisemitism allegations were used to “undermine” the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn.

Speaking on The Andrew Marr Show, Mr McCluskey, who is a major backer of Mr Corbyn, called Mr Corbyn’s critics who supposedly exploited antisemitism to undermine the Labour leader “despicable”. 

He said: “I’m absolutely convinced that there were those individuals who opposed Jeremy Corbyn’s election right from the beginning [and] used the antisemitism issue to undermine him – there is no doubt about that.”

Although he observed that “lots of people were genuinely concerned” and graciously added that “I have no problem with that,” he nevertheless insisted that “there were others who were disingenuous.”

This is not the first time Mr McCluskey has tried to minimise the antisemitism scandal that has engulfed the Labour Party. He has previously claimed that the Labour Party’s antisemitism crisis is only a problem due to “right-wing media” supposedly exaggerating the issue; he has accused Jewish organisations of plotting to ensure that the Labour Party’s antisemitism crisis is “prolonged and intensified”; and he attacked the Chief Rabbi for calling out Labour antisemitism and the unfitness of its leader for public office.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Twitter has reportedly apologised after an investigation found that it permitted advertisements to be micro-targeted at neo-Nazis and other bigots, as well as vulnerable young people suffering from eating disorders.

The social media giant allows brands to target their advertisements at users who search for particular words and phrases, in order to pinpoint users most likely to be interested in their product or service.

An investigation found that companies could send adverts to users who have searched for words such as “white supremacists”. It also showed that targeting people in the UK using the term “neo-Nazi” could reach as many as 81,000 people.

Twitter has been criticised in the past over extremism on its platform. In a statement, the company said that its “preventative measures include banning certain sensitive or discriminatory terms, which we update on a continuous basis. In this instance, some of these terms were permitted for targeting purposes. This was an error.

“We’re very sorry this happened and as soon as we were made aware of the issue, we rectified it. We continue to enforce our ads policies, including restricting the promotion of content in a wide range of areas, including inappropriate content targeting minors.”

A local branch of the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) shared an article on Twitter on the eve of Holocaust Memorial Day that denied the extent of the Holocaust and breached the International Definition of Antisemitism in multiple ways.

The article, shared by the PSC’s Brixton chapter, claimed that “accounts vary regarding the number of Jewish victims who were killed as a result of the Nazi crimes during WWII. While some historians say the number reaches six million, others reduce it to hundreds of thousands.” The article went on to say that “it seems that the debate over the number of the victims of the Holocaust has nothing to do wtih logic or morality.” According to the Definition, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

The article also stated that the “Zionist settler-colonial state of Israel…is a state based on racist ideology that despises human life”. According to the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

Further, the article also claims that “the ideology [of Zionism] that led to the Nakba practically aligns with the ideology that led to the Holocaust…[and] the pains of the victims are similar, whether in Auschwitz or in Deir Yassin.” According to the Definition, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic.

This is not the first time the PSC has been embroiled in a controversy over antisemitism. In 2019, an investigation by the Evening Standard found the organisation awash with antisemitic tropes, while a month-long investigation by Campaign Against Antisemitism in 2017 exposed extensive antisemitic bigotry amongst PSC supporters on social media.

Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the Labour Party, is facing calls again to stand down as a patron of PSC.

The University of Warwick has been condemned by Andrew Percy MP in the House of Commons for refusing to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Percy, who co-chairs the All Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, urged public bodies to adopt the Definition in comments in Parliament last week, saying that “this applies to universities as well where we have a big problem with antisemitism on campuses”. In particular, he singled out “universities like Warwick, whose Vice-Chancellor is refusing to sign up” to the Definition.

The Vice-Chancellor declined to adopt the Definition because it did not offer “any added value,” declaring that the university would not “formally adopt individual definitions of specific forms of discriminatory behaviour.” The Vice-Chancellor explained that “to adopt one would inevitably lead to the adoption of a whole series of such definitions.” The university, however, would be “mindful” of the Definition.

The decision was criticised by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society, which, following Mr Percy’s comments, reiterated its call on the university to adopt the Definition. The president of the Society said that the reference to the university’s refusal to adopt the Definition in the House of Commons “is a damning indictment of our university”, adding: “Enough is enough. The university should finally listen to Jewish students and adopt the Definition without delay.”

The university’s Students’ Union also criticised the Vice-Chancellor’s decision, noting that the university has adopted a “revamped Sexual Misconduct policy” because “it was widely agreed that a specific definition of sexual misconduct was a given for an effective process to be formulated.” It concluded that “we cannot therefore place our trust in the university to take racism seriously – particularly in the area of discipline – without an equally specific definition of what racial discrimination actually entails. It is unacceptable for victims of racism to constantly have to explain and unpack their experiences in order to be taken seriously.”

It is understood that negotiations on the matter at the University of Warwick will continue.

Robert Jenrick, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has made several calls on universities, as well as local councils, to adopt the Definition, warning that those that do not may be named and shamed and have their funding cut.The Universities Minister, Chris Sikdmore, has also called on universities to adopt the Definition.

Baroness Deech has warned political leaders against “passive acts of commemoration” on Holocaust Memorial Day, calling instead for them “to commit to protecting Jewish communities from violence and hatred.”

Writing in The House magazine, Baroness Deech noted that “the Holocaust is a collective trauma for the Jewish people. The unbearable knowledge of what occurred has affected, informed and inspired Jews and the State of Israel.” However, she warned that Holocaust Memorial Day “must be about more than remembrance: it must be about action.”

Baroness Deech, who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, observed the appalling rise in antisemitic crime. Indeed Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

She also noted the full statutory investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) into antisemitism in the Labour Party, which is the largest political party in Europe. The EHRC launched its investigation on 28th May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

While recognising the importance of commemorating the crimes of the past, Baroness Deech stipulated that world leaders much also “commit to concrete action to fight antisemitism and redouble their efforts to stem the resurgence of race hatred in Western countries.”

“Substantive steps,” she suggested, might include wider adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, including at universities, more funding and training to secure Jewish communal institutions, and more resources for education “about the Jewish story in order to inoculate against antisemitism before it starts.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism joins Baroness Deech in calling for #ActionNotWords in the commemoration of antisemitism in the past and the fight against its resurgence today.

The Sheffield branch of the University and College Union (UCU) has been criticised for holding an event to mark Holocaust Memorial Day featuring a controversial Jewish academic who holds unrepresentative views regarding the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The event was in fact billed as an evaluation of the Definition. The speaker was Brian Klug, a Senior Research Fellow at St Benet’s Hall, University of Oxford, who defended the Labour Party’s unacceptable substitute for the Definition.

Among the critics was Holocaust survivor and founder trustee of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, Agnes Grunwald-Spier MBE, who insisted that she was “not raising the issue…because I object to controversial views being expressed in a university – on the contrary,” but rather because Dr Klug is reportedly opposed to the adoption of the Definition by universities – “a very useful tool in controlling hate speech against Jews” – his opinions will not be balanced at the event and it is inappropriate to use Holocaust Memorial Day to promote divisive views. “I also object,” she said, “to a day which is supposed to reflect on the lessons of the Holocaust and to remember the many victims of the Nazis and subsequent genocides being hijacked in this manner.”

UCU has a very negative reputation in the Jewish community, resulting from a poor record when it comes to fighting antisemitism, including refusing to adopt the Definition, repeatedly endorsing the antisemitism-riddled Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against the Jewish State (the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating) and fighting a legal battle against a Jewish academic who unsuccessfully sued UCU for breach of the Equality Act 2010.

Most recently, in October, the union sent an e-mail to secretaries of local branches encouraging them to mark Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January and providing a near-exhaustive list of minority groups persecuted by the Nazis — but failing to include the Jews.

Labour leadership hopeful Emily Thornberry has praised Jeremy Corbyn for “always calling out those people who play the race card” at a Holocaust Memorial Day event.

Speaking at an event at Islington Assembly Hall to an audience that included fellow local MP Mr Corbyn, Ms Thornberry advised that it was not just the pupils present who needed to learn the lessons of history, but also the “adults, especially the politicians amongst us.”

Mr Corbyn also addressed the ceremony, describing how “the Nazi Party rose to power and how they murdered six million Jewish people along with all the travellers and gypsies they could, along with lesbian and gay people.”

A Holocaust survivor, Hana Kleiner, lamented in Mr Corbyn’s presence “the current rise of antisemitism” and blasted Holocaust denial “in the face of all the documented evidence”.

The Mayor of Islington, Cllr Rakhia Ismail, mentioned the “need to hold politicians to account” over genocides around the world, but suggested that it was “Number 10 (Downing Street) and America or other parts of the world” who were guilty of “supporting blindly” contemporary genocides.

Other politicians were unimpressed with the political speeches. Dame Margaret Hodge MP, said: “If it wasn’t so serious, this would be a joke. I think Emily Thornberry needs to reflect on the reality before she makes statements like that.”

Ian Austin, the former Labour MP who resigned from Labour over antisemitism and is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It’s easy to speak about racism at a Holocaust commemoration.  But their words would have much more weight if the Labour Party had not been poisoned by racism against Jewish people under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership. He could start to make amends by booting out the racists and apologising for his responsibility for this scandal before he stands down.”

The event comes after Mr Corbyn appeared to back Rebecca Long-Bailey, long viewed as the “continuity candidate”, for the leadership, describing her as “our candidate for leader” at a political event. Mr Corbyn’s aides suggested that the Party leader had not intended to formally endorse Ms Long-Bailey.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which was equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders in the 2019 general election. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament accounted for 82 percent of all incidents.

Rory Stewart has described the significance of Holocaust Memorial Day as “eternal”, and that the Holocaust “shines a light on how even in perceived metropolis liberal cities…scapegoating, racism and prejudice can result in the greatest of human horrors. It makes us see how seemingly ordinary people can evolve into an evil kind. It makes us see how quickly political rhetoric and posturing can become murder.”

The former Conservative MP turned independent candidate for the London mayoralty, also described the Shoah as “the darkest period in the history of mankind.”

Writing in the JC, Mr Stewart insisted that “the threat of antisemitism remains live and real. It is seen now in Britain not only among the far-left and the far-right.”

He said that “Holocaust Memorial Day must forever remain an essential part of this country’s educational calendar.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

We are currently recruiting an Executive Assistant and Events Manager to join our London office

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Campaign Against Antisemitism is a volunteer-led charity dedicated to exposing and countering antisemitism through education and zero-tolerance enforcement of the law. Everything that we do is done by people who volunteer their time, using donations contributed by members of the public. Join the fight against antisemitism by subscribing to our updates, volunteering, or donating.

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