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British Council for Countering Antisemitism established to ensure unity and strength in response to antisemitism

Campaign Against Antisemitism has today co-founded the British Council for Countering Antisemitism, with the Jewish Police Association, the Kehilah Security and Protection Association (KASPA), Shomrim Broughton Park, Shomrim North West London and Stamford Hill Shomrim. The organisation will have no staff or offices, the secretariat being provided by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

In a joint statement, the co-founders said: “In response to mounting antisemitism, organisations responsible for fighting antisemitism in the United Kingdom have come together to establish the British Council for Countering Antisemitism (BCCA). The BCCA aims to foster cooperation between its founding members, enabling them to speak with a single voice on important matters and providing a forum through which to devise and deliver new strategies and frameworks for countering antisemitism in the United Kingdom.”

In the past two years, antisemitic crime has surged by 45%, and 39% of British Jews now conceal their religion in public.

We are delighted to be co-founding this initiative with partners who share our dedication to keeping British Jews safe. It is absolutely crucial for Campaign Against Antisemitism and other organisations which counter antisemitism in Britain to work together closely for the good of the Jewish community and British society as a whole. Establishing the BCCA is an important step in ensuring that we challenge antisemitism from a position of unity and strength.

You can follow the BCCA’s work on its website, Facebook page and Twitter account.

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CPS reveals it prosecuted thousands of hate crimes last year, but it has yet to prosecute more than two dozen antisemitic crimes per year

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has released statistics, stating that in 2016/17 it prosecuted 14,480 hate crimes.

Whilst the CPS says that it is prosecuting hate crime ferociously, we have yet to see a single year in which more than a couple of dozen antisemitic hate crimes were prosecuted. So far in 2017, we are aware of a paltry 21 prosecutions, in 2016 there were 20, and in 2015 there were just 12.

So serious are the failures by the CPS to take action that we have had to privately prosecute alleged antisemites ourselves and challenge the CPS through judicial review, the first of which we won in March.

Last year only 1.9% of hate crime against Jews was prosecuted, signalling to police forces that their effort in investigating hate crimes against Jews might be wasted, and sending the strong message to antisemites that they need not fear the law.

Set against a backdrop of rising antisemitic crime, this is especially unacceptable. In 2014, antisemitic crime broke all records, but rather than being met with the full force of the law, antisemites have been able to target the Jewish community with relative impunity. Each year since 2014 has been a record-breaking year for antisemitic crime: between 2014 and 2016, antisemitic crime surged by 45%.

The failure to prosecute cases of antisemitism appears to be making police reluctant to put effort into investigating antisemitism in certain cases because of fears that despite their work, the CPS may drop the case. Despite the rapid rise in antisemitic hate crime, charging of antisemitic crime dropped by 36% between 2014 and 2016.

The message sent to antisemites and British Jews is chilling. According to our 2017 polling, only 39% of British Jews feel confident that antisemitic hate crimes against them would be prosecuted, and 52% believe that the CPS is doing too little to fight antisemitism. Almost one in three British Jews considered leaving Britain due to antisemitism in the past two years.

The CPS must start to seriously address hate crime against Jews. If it is so proud of its record, why does it refuse to break down its hate crime prosecutions in the same way as police forces, to show how many antisemitism cases were referred and how many were prosecuted?

 

 

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Scott Nelson who was “removed” from the Labour Party following tweets about “Jewish companies” tells CAA he can apply to rejoin “whether you like it or not”

Scott Nelson, a Labour Party activist with almost 50,000 followers on Twitter, was reportedly “removed” from the Labour Party over a series of about “Jewish companies” tweets in 2015, but he has now told Campaign Against Antisemitism that he can apply to rejoin the Party “whether you like it or not”.

In a conversation on Twitter on 8th October, he was asked by another Twitter user: “Still expelled from the party, Scott?”. Mr Nelson responded “Nope”, prompting Campaign Against Antisemitism to approach him for clarification.

Now, Mr Nelson has claimed that he was not expelled over antisemitism at all, despite indications to the contrary. He told us that his membership was terminated because of his opposition to the selection of a Council candidate which he considered to be motivated by nepotism.

Yet Mr Nelson, who is also known as “Socialist Voice” and describes himself on his Twitter profile as a “Jeremy Corbyn supporter”, was “removed” from the Party after he tweeted about the “Jewish blood” of companies including Marks and Spencer and Tesco in 2015. On 17th December 2015, he tweeted: “Deaths of workers abroad caused by appalling conditions working for Jewish companies”. On 18th December 2015, he tweeted: “Jewish ancestors created those companies. These companies have Jewish blood. My ancestors were Irish, so I have Irish blood”. He added that: “Pointing out the Jewish ancestors of Tesco and M&S and the human rights abuses of workers abroad doesn’t make me an antisemite.”

On the same day, the Labour Party Press Team tweeted in response to a complaint about Mr Nelson’s tweets: “The tweets are unacceptable and he has already been removed from the Party”. A letter of the same date from the Labour Party, shown to us by Mr Nelson, informed him that “Comments posted to social media by you have given us grounds to believe that you do not share Labour’s aims and values.”

Mr Nelson’s claims that he was not removed from the Party due to antisemitism are further cast into doubt due to the statement that he himself issued on 19th December 2015, in which he wrote: “Today I received written confirmation from the Labour Party informing me that my membership has been terminated. I will be lodging an appeal on Monday. Having thought about this matter, I accept that I used clumsy and inappropriate wording concerning the Jewish heritage of Tesco and M&S by mentioning Jewish blood and my comments about Blairites being purged for disloyalty to Jeremy Corbyn.”

In respons to our enquiries, Mr Nelson told us: “My tweets about Jewish blood were badly worded and were taken out of context, I did not intend to cause offence to the Jewish community. However, my tweet depicting the star of David with a swastika was not only stupid, it was disrespectful and I accept that it did cause offence…My other tweets likening Israel’s treatment of Palestinians to the actions of Nazis were in response to horrific reports that Palestinian children had been burned alive, women had been raped and tortured and innocent men, women and children had been shot dead by IDF soldiers. Most of these reports were by Middle Eastern news sources; they were not being widely reported by Western media sources. Similar barbaric actions were committed by the Nazis; however, I am not suggesting that IDF soldiers are Nazis and nor am I comparing Israel to Nazis. I have Jewish friends and I know many Jewish people and they are horrified at the atrocities being committed by both Israel and Palestine.”

Notwithstanding his attempts to apologise, Mr Nelson has continued to cause offence. For example, he has accused what he calls “Israel supporters” or “the Israel Lobby” of concocting allegations of antisemitism, and he has used Nazi-era antisemitic metaphors such as “vermin” and “parasites” to refer to those who complain about antisemitism.

For example, on 3rd October 2016, he published a blog post accusing Israel of actions “similar to the crimes committed by the Nazis during the Second World War” and arguing that antisemitism in Britain is “partly caused by people who are falsely accusing others of antisemitism.” On 9th January 2017, he published a blog post alleging that “the Israel Lobby were [sic] behind the witch hunts against Jeremy Corbyn, his supporters and people like me”, describing “pro-Israel supporters” as “scum – and lower than vermin”and stating that “the Israel Lobby… have [sic] one objective and that is to take down Jeremy Corbyn.” Three days later, he republished an anonymous defence of the Holocaust denier Alison Chabloz and — instead of condemning it — approvingly stated that it “sums up the Israel Lobby and the influence and control it has over Britain’s press.”

On 4th April 2017, Mr Nelson responded to statements by the leader of Labour’s Jewish grouping with the words: “I’d sooner have Ken Livingstone in the Labour Party than these [sic] bunch of toxic parasites who think they can control people’s lives.” Two days afterwards, he published a blog post in support of Mr Livingstone, alleging that “The Israel Lobby uses antisemitism to destroy people’s lives” and “will stoop to any level to vilify and falsely accuse a person of antisemitism.” In that same post, he also insisted that “Ken should not have to apologise for quoting a historical fact and nor should he be silenced by the Israel Lobby, Blairites and by people who found his comments to be offensive” and declared: “I stand in solidarity with Ken Livingstone and I will continue to defend him because he has done absolutely nothing wrong, but the people who are vilifying and attacking him for quoting a historical fact are lower than vermin.”

Ironically, the best account of the matter comes from Mr Nelson himself, because Baroness Chakrabarti’s whitewash report into antisemitism in the Labour Party introduced procedures to keep the outcome of any disciplinary procedures secret.

Mr Nelson has told us that he may now rejoin the Labour Party, writing: “I can reapply to rejoin the party later this year and may consider rejoining next year — whether you like it or not.” He may well be right, as following other readmissions, we have no reason to expect that Mr Nelson will be treated differently.

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Exterior of Etz Chaim synagogue in Leeds vandalised with swastika and “K***s get out” threat

The exterior of the Etz Chaim Synagogue in Leeds has been defaced with threatening graffiti overnight. A sign for the synagogue’s hall was defaced with a swastika and the word “K***s” and the driveway of the synagogue was daubed with an apparent threat to congregants: “K***s get out”.

Police are investigating. We are following the case with interest.

Antisemitic crime surged by 45% between 2014 and 2016, making 2016 the worst year on record. It is expected that 2017 might be worse still when police forces release their statistics. Despite this, police were found to have charged 35% fewer cases of antisemitic hate crime in 2016 than they did in 2014, and the Crown Prosecution Service has yet to prosecute more than two dozen hate crimes per year. It is vital that antisemites are brought to justice and made to fear the law.

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CAA contacts Reading International Solidarity Centre over charity’s planned book launch for notorious antisemite Gilad Atzmon

The Reading International Solidarity Centre will be hosting a the launch of notorious antisemite Gilad Atzmon’s new book, Being in Time — A Post-Political Manifesto. Organised by Reading Friends of Palestine, the event is part of the Reading International Festival and will take place at 7:30pm on 22nd October.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to the Reading International Solidarity Centre to alert them that Gilad Atzmon is a notorious antisemite who has, for a number of years, used social media as a vehicle to harass and bait Jewish people. If they insist on holding the event, we will contact organisations which donate to the Centre, as well as the Charity Commission.

In March this year, Mr Atzmon attended a talk at the London School of Economics with Richard Falk, the discredited and disgraced fringe antisemitic conspiracy theorist and the former UN envoy, where he reportedly told those around him that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving.” Stunned audience members asked him to repeat what he had said and he did. Mr Atzmon also was heard recommending the works of disgraced historian David Irving, who in 2000 was proven in court to be an antisemite, a Holocaust denier and an admirer of Hitler. It is also reported that Mr Atzmon later said, “Jews are always expelled for a reason.”

In December 2014, he told a Jewish Twitter user, “I am not a Jew any more. I indeed despise the Jew in me (whatever is left). I absolutely detest the Jew in you.”

Another of his books, The Wandering Who, was described in 2011 as “quite probably the most antisemitic book published in this country in recent years.”

He has stated that Jews were responsible for their persecution by the Nazis, Jews should apologise for making gentiles hate them, burning synagogues is “a rational act”, Jews are trying to control the world, Jews are harming the planet, Jews caused the credit crunch, and Israel is worse than Nazi Germany. He has also trivialised the scale and impact of the Holocaust.

The International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British government, states, among other things, that the following are antisemitic:

  • Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions.
  • Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust).
  • Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.

In March 2012, a collective of Palestinian writers and activists disavowed Mr Atzmon for his attacks on Jews and Judaism, as well as his denial of the Holocaust.

You may wish to contact the Reading International Solidarity Centre to politely add your voice to calls for the launch to be cancelled by e-mailing admin@risc.org.uk or calling 01189 586 692.

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Antisemitic conspiracy theorist Tapash Abu Shaim ran stall at Labour Party Conference and given tour of Parliament by Jeremy Corbyn

The leader of the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, reportedly gave a guided tour of the Houses of Parliament to Labour Party member Tapash Abu Shaim, who has a history of allegedly promoting antisemitic conspiracies. Representatives from the Palestine Solidarity Campaign (PSC) were also reportedly on the tour, which took place on 17th May 2012.

In a tweet of thanks, Mr Abu Shaim wrote: “You are best tourist guide Mr @JeremyCorbyn . Your knowledge about your history so deep and clear.” Mr Corbyn responded in a tweet the next day, writing: “@TapashAbuShaim @PSCupdates It was a pleasure showing PSC supporters round the vagaries of Parliament & British history last night; thanks!” Both tweets are still on Twitter.

In February, we released a report which exposed antisemitism inside the PSC.

The Labour Party was apparently informed about Mr Abu Shaim’s social media activity in August but it appears that no action was taken. Concerns were reportedly raised last year over his attendance at the Labour Conference in 2016. Guido Fawkes also revealed that Mr Abu Shaim manned a Palestine Solidarity Campaign stall at the recent Labour Party conference. The exhibition stall and desk was apparently inside the conference centre secure zone. According to Guido Fawkes, Labour has now launched an investigation into Mr Abu Shaim’s behaviour.

Mr Abu Shaim’s promotion of antisemitic conspiracies on social media has been well documented. According to political website, Guido Fawkes, just four months before Mr Corbyn gave Mr Abu Shaim the guided tour of Parliament, Mr Abu Shaim reportedly posted on Facebook: “9/11 Truth could be the answer to the Israel/Palestine conflict”, along with a link to an article by Veterans Today, a far-right US website which publishes antisemitic conspiracy myths.

In the wake of the January 2015 Paris terror attack, in which people were murdered at the office of Charlie Hebdo and at a kosher supermarket, Mr Abu Shaim reportedly posted: “US politician Jack Lindblad claims Charlie Hebdo killings were ‘by US and Mossad’ to keep Israel’s Netanyahu in power.” In another post, he reportedly claimed that ISIS really stands for “International Solidarity for Israeli Sentiment”. He shared yet another which read: “confirmed ISIS is a Mossad united state of IsraHELL creation.”

The Labour Party introduced new rules at its conference making it easier to expel antisemites from the Party, however the Conference saw ugly scenes including a room applauding a call to be allowed to deny that the Holocaust happened, and shouting “Throw them out” in response to a speaker urging the expulsion of the Party’s Jewish grouping. Despite this, Jeremy Corbyn failed to mention antisemitism at all in his Conference speech.

A Labour Party spokesperson is quoted by Guido Fawkes as saying: “We are an anti-racist party and condemn in the strongest possible terms antisemitism and all forms of discrimination – they have no place in our Party. Our recent rule change at [our] Annual Conference shows the Party is taking a proactive approach to tackling antisemitism. This rule change will strengthen our disciplinary proceedings and help the Party uphold its core values of equality, solidarity and inclusion.”

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Ofcom dismisses CAA complaint over Al Jazeera’s so-called documentary “The Lobby”, which alleged a conspiracy at the heart of British politics run by Israel

The broadcasting regulator, Ofcom, has dismissed complaints by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others against “The Lobby”, a so-called documentary on Al Jazeera English. Ofcom launched a formal investigation into “The Lobby” following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism in Janaury and three other complaints.

“The Lobby” was premised on a remark by a junior Israeli Embassy employee and an MP’s former adviser. From one brief conversation, the programme attempted to extrapolate the existence of a full-bodied conspiracy, including the suggestion that swathes of the British Jewish community are in league with the Israeli government to subvert British democracy. In our complaint, our Regulatory Enforcement Unit alleged that the programme breached several core Principles of the Broadcasting Code, including accuracy, impartiality, fair treatment of individuals, harmful material and incitement.

However, this morning, Ofcom told us that: “Following careful consideration of the issues raised, Ofcom has decided not to uphold the complaints received”.

Ofcom has published its ruling that “The Lobby” was not in breach of broadcasting rules 2.3 and 5.5 on impartiality and discrimination. Though Ofcom did apply the International Definition of Antisemitism, it stated that it “did not consider that such a critical analysis of the actions of a foreign state constituted antisemitism, particularly as the overall focus of the programme was to examine whether the State of Israel was acting in a manner that would be expected of other democratic nations.” Furthermore, Ofcom ruled that “the programme had included a range of viewpoints on this matter of political controversy…and in light of the nature of the programme and its particular subject matter, we considered that the programme had maintained due impartiality.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism had argued that the programme:

  • Argued that the accusation of antisemitism is simply a means by which the Israeli government slurs its enemies, and that by extension Jewish complaints about antisemitic prejudice are disingenuous;
  • Proposed that the Labour Party’s antisemitism crisis is manufactured;
  • Belittled genuine and legitimate Jewish concerns;
  • Portrayed a particular Jewish individual as a thug cynically pretending to be a victim of antisemitism;
  • Spun routine internal political discussion and external organising in relation to Israel as conspiratorial and malign;
  • Portrayed the Israeli Embassy as controlling a wide network of Jewish and non-Jewish organisations; and
  • Placed Shai Masot, a junior Israeli Embassy employee, at the centre of a network, reminiscent of the well-known, historic antisemitic “Jewish Spider” claim with no evidence other than an arrogant offhand remark made by Mr Masot.

Whilst we welcomed Ofcom’s decision to launch a formal investigation, we are extremely disappointed that it has decided to allow Al Jazeera English to escape without rebuke. The suggestions of an overarching conspiracy run by the Israeli Embassy, and that the Labour Party’s antisemitism is manufactured, are very concerning due to the flimsy basis on which they were made, and the overall message of the programme.

The only way to appeal Ofcom’s decision is by bringing an action for judicial review, in which it would have to be proved that Ofcom’s ruling was so unreasonable that no reasonable person acting reasonably could have made it.

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Total vindication for CAA as police and CPS start to fully prosecute antisemitism cases they had turned down until CAA took legal action

Until we succeeded, Campaign Against Antisemitism had always been told that it was completely impossible to force the state to take action against antisemites. The Jewish community had tried coaxing the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) into action over the course of decades to no avail. When Campaign Against Antisemitism was formed, we too tried to amicably convince the CPS to do more, even arranging a summit with the then Home Secretary, Theresa May, and the current Director of Public Prosecutions, Alison Saunders.

It soon became clear to us that pleading with the CPS would not work, but when we took legal action we were told by others in the Jewish community that confronting the CPS could only be damaging and would not result in progress.

Our approach has now been totally vindicated.

In July 2015, neo-Nazis sought to march through Golders Green. We stopped their march, and instead they gathered in a kettling pen in Westminster. One of them, Jeremy Bedford-Turner, said that: “…all politicians are nothing but a bunch of puppets dancing to a Jewish tune, and the ruling regimes in the West for the last one hundred years have danced to the same tune.” Evoking medieval libels which claimed that Jews drank the blood of non-Jewish children, Bedford-Turner told his followers, of whom one third were from the violent extreme-right National Rebirth of Poland group, that the French Revolution and both World Wars were massacres perpetrated by Jews. He concluded that England was “merry” during the period of the expulsion of Jews from England and demanded: “Let’s free England from Jewish control.” The speech was filmed and posted on YouTube, where it remains.

When the CPS refused to prosecute him, we launched judicial review proceedings to quash the CPS’s decision not to prosecute, and after 13 months, we won a comprehensive victory. There was a risk however that the CPS could take us back to square one by refusing to prosecute for a different reason, and we would have had to start our judicial review again.

We have now learned that Jeremy Bedford-Turner has been charged with incitement to racial hatred for his speech.

In 2015 we also reported Alison Chabloz to police over her antisemitic social media activity. Due to strict time limits on bringing prosecutions, and the failure of the criminal justice system to act on the information that we provided to them, we were forced to launch a private prosecution. We alleged that Ms Chabloz had produced and circulated various antisemitic music videos.

Earlier this year, accepting that Ms Chabloz should have been prosecuted, the CPS exercised its power to take over our private prosecution. On Wednesday last week, after Campaign Against Antisemitism sent more than a dozen letters to police with information about alleged bail breaches and further hate crimes, she has now been arrested on suspicion of breaching her bail conditions and committing additional crimes.

Neither Mr Bedford-Turner nor Ms Chabloz are important people, but their cases are important because the fact that prosecutions are being brought represents two major successes in Campaign Against Antisemitism’s struggle to ensure that alleged antisemites face the full force of the law. After remaining defiantly inert for years, the CPS has now been forced by our legal interventions to take action.

We will maintain our efforts and are discussing further cases with our lawyers. In particular, we would like to thank Brian Kennelly QC, Jamie Susskind and David Sonn, who acted pro bono in our judicial review of the decision not to prosecute Jeremy Bedford-Turner, and Jonathan Goldberg QC, Jeffrey Israel, Senghin Kong and Stephen Gilchrist who acted pro bono in our private prosecution of Alison Chabloz.

When Campaign Against Antisemitism was formed in 2014, we promised to do our level best to ensure that the law was enforced against antisemitism with zero tolerance, and that remains our mission today.

If you have been the victim of an antisemitic crime, or antisemitism at the hands of a member of a regulated profession (for example a teacher, doctor, security guard, charity worker or accountant), and you are dissatisfied with the way it was dealt with by police or regulators, please e-mail investigations@antisemitism.uk and we will look into whether we can help.

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CAA welcomes Home Office announcement of a new national online hate crime hub for police, exactly as we recommended

The Home Office has today announced plans for the National Online Hate Crime Hub which has long been called for by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

We have repeatedly brought our experiences to the attention of the Home Office and politicians as we frequently find that regular police officers do not know how to obtain evidence from social media companies, are unfamiliar with the rules for collaboration between different police forces, and often fail to understand when an antisemitic crime has been committed online.

In our submission to the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee in February, we noted: “Investigating online hate crime and extremism requires specialised skills which are clearly lacking in many police forces, and also require a national approach due to the interconnected nature of online hate crime and extremism.” The solution we recommended was “A national centre for policing online hate crime and extremism”, which is what the Home Office has now announced.

The new National Online Hate Crime Hub will be run by the National Police Chiefs’ Council and will focus on increasing the number of prosecutions for online hate offences. Its primary purpose will be to improve the investigation of online hate crime by identifying perpetrators, compiling evidence packs and ensuring that the relevant police forces take action. At present, Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Crime Unit has to intervene significantly to assist investigations into online antisemitic hate crime.

In making the announcement, Home Secretary Amber Rudd confirmed that “What is illegal offline is illegal online, and those who commit these cowardly crimes should be met with the full force of the law.”

The responsibilities and structure of the National Online Hate Crime Hub precisely mirror what Campaign Against Antisemitism has been calling for. This new hub should greatly improve the response to online antisemitic hate crime, and we look forward to working with its officers. However, it remains to be seen whether investigations do in fact improve, and crucially whether the Crown Prosecution Service prosecutes the cases referred to it by police.

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CAA withdraws complaints and commends Sunday Times following meeting to discuss Kevin Myers’ antisemitic column

Campaign Against Antisemitism has met with members of the senior management of the Sunday Times to discuss how it came to publish an antisemitic column by Kevin Myers in July.

The column by Kevin Myers contained the following paragraph about the BBC pay row: “I note that two of the best-paid women presenters in the BBC — Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz, with whose, no doubt, sterling work I am tragically unacquainted — are Jewish. Good for them. Jews are not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price, which is the most useful measure there is of inveterate, lost-with-all-hands stupidity. I wonder, who are their agents? If they’re the same ones that negotiated the pay for the women on the lower scales, then maybe the latter have found their true value in the marketplace.”

On the day that the column was published, Campaign Against Antisemitism asked that the newspaper apologise, remove the column and end its relationship with Mr Myers, which the Sunday Times did almost immediately.

At a meeting on Tuesday between leaders of Campaign Against Antisemitism and senior managers of the Sunday Times, it was explained how processes have been tightened to preventfurther publication of such material. .

The newspaper’s management was transparent about how the article came to be published, and though it should not have slipped through the editorial process, we now understand how it did. We are satisfied that processes have been improved and we are grateful to the Sunday Times for being so open with us. Consequently we are withdrawing our complaints with the Independent Press Standards Organisation and the Irish Press Ombudsman.

Though this matter had an unhappy beginning, we are very pleased by the outcome and the message that it sends that the Sunday Times will not tolerate antisemitism.

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Extremist speakers have a free run at British universities and antisemitism is rife at events, new report finds

A detailed report on “Extreme speakers and events” in the 2016-17 academic year has revealed a plethora of antisemitic extremist speakers being given platforms in British universities. Of the 112 separate extremist events mentioned in the report, 50 events included the hosting of known antisemites such as Anas Al Tikriti who vehemently criticised the Muslim Council of Britain for their ending of their outrageous boycott of Holocaust Memorial Day and Yvonne Ridley, who engaged in antisemitic rhetoric in her criticism of Israel, claiming that “the Zionists have tentacles everywhere.” Events were also organised by various organisations with known links to antisemitism, according to the report’s authors, the Henry Jackson Society think tank and Student Rights.

The report singled out the Islamic Education and Research Academy (IERA), which was investigated by the Charity Commission over comments made by its founder, Abdurraheem Green. Mr Green was recorded saying: “Why don’t you take the Yahoudi [Jew] over there, far away so his stench doesn’t disturb us?” The charity said that the comment was “aimed at a habitual heckler in Hyde Park Speakers’ Corner, in a highly charged forum of debate, who happened to be Jewish. It was not aimed at any community or meant to be antisemitic in any way. However, recognising that it could be misconstrued, he has apologised openly for such errors of judgement made more than 20 years ago.” The comment was referred to the Charity Commission as part of a report by the Council of Ex-Muslims of Britain. The Commission responded that it will not act over the incident because it found Mr Green’s comments to have been made in a “personal capacity and not on behalf of the charity or at an event it organised,” though it did concede that the comments exposed the charity to risks.

Mr Green himself spoke at one event this year, at the SOAS Islamic Society Annual Charity Week Dinner and Auction. We put the matter to IERA, which directed us to a video by Mr Green responding to claims about him, and their press release in response to the report. The charity said that “The report’s assumptions are wildly speculative and the presentation of information incoherent…[and] makes the dangerous, unfair and irresponsible accusation that iERA’s speakers are ‘extreme’.”

Friends of Al Aqsa also featured prominently in the report, with several notable examples of controversial speakers such as Moshe Machover who spoke at Queen Mary University of London at an event in which he denied Israel’s right to exist, and announced his support for genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisation Hamas’ supposed “right to resist with arms”. This, alongside accusations that Jewish students in attendance were representatives of the “Israeli propaganda machine” led to a formal complaint being made by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Friends of Al Aqsa further co-hosted the Federation of Student Islamic Societies Palestine Conference 2017, which included a presentation by American-Israeli activist Miko Peled who this week made national headlines by demanding at the Labour Party Conference that delegates should have the freedom to engage in debate as to whether the Holocaust actually happened at all, demanding the freedom to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion.” He additionally reportedly proposed that Israelis should be treated like Nazis. His remarks prompted widespread condemnation from politicians and the media. On 23rd May 2016, speaking at an art gallery in Euston, London, Mr Peled reportedly alleged that the Labour Party’s antisemitism furore is being fabricated by “Zionists”, allegedly saying: “Everyone knows this entire antisemitism thing is nonsense”. At the same event, Mr Peled is also said to have alleged that Islamophobia is a strategic invention of “Zionists”, reportedly claiming: “If anyone has any doubt, that this entire Islamophobia thing isn’t coming directly from pro-Israeli groups, then excuse me you are out of your mind. Absolutely. And when you look at each case, individually you will see, the hand, the fingerprints of some Israeli lobby, some pro-Zionist groups.” Furthermore, on 14th September 2016, Mr Peled tweeted about a new aid package granted to Israel by the United States, writing: “Then theyr surprised Jews have reputation 4being sleazy thieves. #apartheidisrael doesn’t need or deserve these $$.” In response, his forthcoming event hosted by the Princeton Committee on Palestine was cancelled on the basis that: “The last string of tweets are antisemitic and hateful, which are counterproductive to an educational event on the conflict.” Friends of Al Aqsa did not respond to our request for a comment.

The report also shows that the quantity of incidents in which antisemitic speakers, or speakers from antisemitic organisations appear on campus shows no reduction through the year, with more events occurring in March than in any prior month. This points towards an ongoing failure by universities to commit to banning speakers to protect Jewish students and the student population at large. As well as the high quantity of speakers holding problematic beliefs about Jews or with ties to controversial organisations, there is also a consistent display of homophobia throughout.

By contrast, the report reveals that both of the two far-right events scheduled to occur in the 2016-2017 academic year were cancelled. This shows that whilst universities and student bodies have proven themselves capable of protecting Jewish and other minority students from aggression from the far-right, the far-left and even Islamist speakers remain largely unchallenged.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has developed relationships with universities around the country, but we experience drastically varying levels of cooperation from one institution to another. Many universities seem to have an extremely poor understanding of antisemitism and extremism. We call on Universities UK and individual universities and students’ unions to shoulder responsibility for the events that our students are exposed to. The threat of radicalisation threatens the whole of British society, not only Jews. Extremists and antisemites must be denied a platform, and universities and students’ unions must strengthen their screening procedures and put an end to this deeply disturbing trend of permitting antisemitic and extremist speakers to influence students on British campuses, thereby putting Jewish students at risk.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstrations and Events Monitoring Unit is particularly keen to hear from students who have concerns about forthcoming events on their campus via campus@antisemitism.uk.

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Alison Chabloz, who is on trial following private prosecution by CAA, has been arrested on suspicion of bail breaches

Alison Chabloz, who is currently standing trial for alleged antisemitic offences, has just been arrested at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on suspicion of bail breaches brought to the attention of police by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Ms Chabloz was the subject of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s first private prosecution for alleged antisemitic offences. We privately prosecuted her as the state had failed to do so and the statutory time limit for bringing a prosecution had almost expired. In December last year, we secured court bail conditions to prevent antisemitic social media activity and various other actions by Ms Chabloz while she awaited trial.

Earlier this year, the Crown Prosecution Service exercised its power to take over our private prosecution, and on the basis of information provided by Campaign Against Antisemitism, the bail conditions were tightened further.

After Campaign Against Antisemitism sent more than a dozen letters to police with information about alleged bail breaches, she has now been arrested on suspicion of breaching her bail conditions.

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Anti-Israel activist convicted of hate crime over intimidatory boycott of Jewish businessman, but walks away with £175 fine

Anti-Israel activist Allister “Ally” Coutts has been convicted of acting in a in a racially-aggravated manner with intent to cause distress and alarm over his attempts to intimidate a Jewish businessman in Aberdeen.

Nisan Ayalon, the owner of Jericho Skin Care, told Campaign Against Antisemitism that protesters had repeatedly visited his stall, which sells beauty products from the Dead Sea, and attempted to intimidate, him, his pregnant wife, his customers and staff.

On 16th August 2016, when Mr Ayalon arrived at his stall, he told us that Mr Coutts approached him shouting “Free Palestine” with his fist upheld. When Mr Ayalon asked him to leave, he says that Mr Coutts responded: “You’re not welcome here.” Security officers from the shopping mall then asked Mr Coutts to leave for 25 minutes whilst he continued his abuse, until police officers arrived and arrested him. Mr Ayalon says that the nature of Mr Coutts’ motivation was clear to all during his exchanges with security and police officers, whom he allegedly told that ISIS really stands for “Israeli Secret Intelligence Service” and that it was supported by Mossad.

On 9th September 2017, Mr Coutts entered a plea of “not guilty” at Aberdeen Sheriff Court, but was convicted on the strength of evidence from the security guards’ body-worn video cameras and he was fined £175 two days later on 11th September. Mr Ayalon was supported throughout by the Jewish community in Aberdeen and Jewish Human Rights Watch.

Mr Coutts is now the third member of the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign to be convicted of an offence due to the use of intimidatory tactics. Earlier this year, an investigation by researcher David Collier uncovered widespread antisemitism amongst activists of the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign, however the group dismissed his detailed findings, predictably publishing a statement announcing that it “is not inclined to take seriously the so-called ‘research’ of a pro-Israel blogger whose primary purpose is to smear organisations that support Palestinian rights”.

Now that the one of the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign’s activists has a hate crime conviction to his name, it will be harder to shrug off such accusations.

However, Campaign Against Antisemitism is dismayed that such a small fine has been imposed. It will hardly deter those who use anti-Israel discourse to disguise their criminal antisemitism. Research by Campaign Against Antisemitism published in August found that 78% of British Jews consider boycotts of businesses selling Israeli products to constitute intimidation.

We sought comment from the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign and Mr Coutts, but we did not receive a response.

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Glenn Okafor walks free with 200 hours of community service after threatening to “wipe out” Jewish families

Glenn Okafor, aged 32, has been convicted of shouting “we will wipe you out” and other antisemitic abuse, including death threats, at Jewish people in Stamford Hill in London on 4th March this year. The incident occurred at 9:00 on a Saturday morning as Jewish families made their way to synagogue, at one point even entering the front garden of a synagogue. Mr Okafor exclaimed at Jewish passersby: “F*** you Jewish people…you lot should go back to your own country”. He also added: “We will sort you out. I have friends. I’ll be back tomorrow. We will wipe you out.” In an apparent reference to a conspiracy theory that white Jews are in fact imposters and that the supposed real Jews are black, Mr Okafor shouted: “We are the real Jews”. Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, assisted officers from the Metropolitan Police Service in arresting Mr Okafor and a man who was walking with him.

Mr Okafor, of West Norwood, was found guilty at Stratford Magistrates’ Court of two counts of religiously-aggravated intentional harassment, alarm or distress contrary to section 4A of the Public Order Act 1986, as amended. He was sentenced at Thames Magistrates’ Court to a 12-month community order with 200 unpaid hours of work. His sentence would have been 150 hours of unpaid work, but 50 hours were added following an application by the Crown Prosecution Service. He was also ordered to pay £150 to his victims and costs of £620.00 to the Crown Prosecution Service.

Chair of the bench, Danni Tate, was not persuaded by Mr Okafor’s claims that he was merely seeking to engage in “theological debate” and wanted to ask his victims “a few questions about the origin of Judaism”.

The victims had to attend court four times during the trial, and each time they were accompanied and supported by volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim.

Deputy Chief Crown Prosecutor for North London, Jan Lamping, said: “Stiffer sentences are a powerful way of sending the message that hate crime is viewed very seriously in the eyes of the law. These were unacceptable, hostile words and threats directed at worshippers intended to make them fearful of their safety. I would encourage all victims to report hate crimes so that others do not become the target of hateful abuse.”

We commend Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Metropolitan Police Service and the Crown Prosecution Service for ensuring that Mr Okafor was brought to justice, however we regret that this sentence is merely the latest in a chain of lenient punishments that will not deter antisemites.

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Imprisoned but not for antisemitism, the man whose brazen “Hitler was right” sign is a case study in the danger of the failure to enforce the law against antisemites

In the summer of 2014, as antisemitism in Britain reached a new peak during the conflict between Israel and Hamas, Hussain Yousef walked through central London holding aloft a sign stating: “Hitler, you were right!” This act was one of the catalysts behind the formation of Campaign Against Antisemitism. We were disgusted that such an individual could brazenly walk through the streets of London with such a sign, in full sight of police officers, without any consequences. Mr Yousef is one of the many cases that convinced so many of us to come together to build a campaign for zero tolerance enforcement of the law against antisemites was necessary.

For three years, Mr Yousef’s identity was unknown to us, but this week he has been sentenced to six-and-a-half years for terrorism offences, however he did not face any charges on account of his antisemitic hate crime, and now it seems that he never will.

We believe that Mr Yousef’s case is a stark reminder of the danger to society of failing to enforce the law against antisemites.

Kingston Crown Court has confirmed to us that Mr Yousef was convicted of collecting or making a record of terrorist information contrary to section 58(1 )(a) of the Terrorism Act 2000, encouraging terrorism contrary to section 1(2) of the Terrorism Act 2006, and dissemination of a terrorist publication contrary to sections 2(1)  and 2(2)(d) of the Terrorism Act 2006. He was found not guilty of two other terrorism offences. The judge also recommended that Mr Yousef should be deported from the United Kingdom upon completion of his sentence.

We welcome this sentence, but Mr Yousef should have come to the attention of the criminal justice system before now. He should have been arrested and investigated in the summer of 2014 when he walked through central London openly declaring his support for the Holocaust, and by inference, demanding that the Jews of Israel too should be systematically annihilated.

Instead, we learned from his trial that it was not until the end of 2015, nearly a year-and-a-half later, that Mr Yousef was investigated by counter-terrorism police over his social media support for Islamist terrorism. Mr Yousef, a 21-year-old asylum seeker from Afghanistan, whose asylum application had been denied, had created multiple Facebook accounts which he used, for example, to call a British Muslim soldier a “Murtad”, meaning an apostate, and he had even shared the purportedly hacked names and addresses of 700 United States military personnel.

Commander Dean Haydon, from the Metropolitan Police Service’s Counter Terrorism Command, confirmed that only terrorism offences were considered, saying: “Yousef was sharing content, images and videos of the terrorist activities of [ISIS] through his various Facebook accounts and trying to get others to support their evil and hateful ideology. This case was brought to our attention thanks to members of the public reporting it to us and I continue to urge anyone who see terrorist or extremist material online to act and report it via the online reporting tool.”

In July 2015, the then Prime Minister, David Cameron, gave a speech identifying that antisemitic conspiracy theories act as a gateway to Islamist extremism and even terrorism. He was right of course, and the case of Mr Yousef is yet further proof of that. It also illustrates very clearly that when antisemitic hate crime goes ignored, not just British Jews but all of British society is put at risk.

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Police investigating antisemitic abuse after passenger repeatedly swore at Rabbi and accused him of “murdering Muslims” while on a bus in north London

A rabbi from north London’s orthodox charedi Jewish community has been subjected to a barrage of antisemitic abuse while travelling through Stamford Hill on the 253 bus service. At 20:40 on Wednesday evening, a middle-aged man of Middle Eastern appearance boarded the bus, sat immediately behind him and began to swear at him under his breath. When, on arrival at the stop outside the Shell petrol station in Upper Clapton Road, the rabbi stood up to leave the bus, his abuser shouted at him, “Why are you killing all the Muslims? You are a murderer!” The rabbi declined the bus driver’s offer to call the police, as he was on his way to officiate at a ceremony. However, the next day, he made contact with the police himself. Clearly still angry and upset, he told us: “He was clearly antisemitic. He has no right to say these things to a person in a public place.”

If anybody has information that could assist the investigation into this incident, they should notify the police by dialling 101.

The victim contacted Stamford Hill Shomrim, a volunteer Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol, which referred the case to Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Crime Unit for assistance.

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Labour Friends of Palestine and the Middle East apologises for post on social media proposing a “final solution”

Labour Friends of Palestine and the Middle East (LFPME) has apologised for an “extremely poor choice of words” after it posted on social media referring to a “final solution.”

LFPME published posts on Facebook and Twitter on Monday about Labour’s support for a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The caption read: “The Labour party’s two state solution will END the occupation – our solution will be the final solution. #FreePalestine #EndtheSeige [sic].”

The “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” was the Nazi plan for the extermination of the Jews.

Following public pressure, the posts were removed from the LFPME social media accounts, with a message on the organisation’s Facebook wall admitting: “There was a post published earlier on this page which contained an extremely poor choice of words. Due to the preparations for the Party conference, we were unable to effectively check every piece of content being published on our page. While the use of the phrase in this context was a genuine error, we would like to sincerely apologise for the hurt it has caused and will endeavour to ensure such errors do not occur again in the future.”

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Home Secretary designates two more far-right groups as terrorist organisations following wave of arrests

As of tomorrow, Scottish Dawn and NS131 will be proscribed terrorist organisations, according an order laid before Parliament by the Home Secretary. Being a member of, supporting or wearing the emblems of those groups will become a criminal offence, carrying a hefty prison sentence.

The announcement comes following a wave of arrests of individuals alleged to be members of another group, National Action including civilians and soldiers. National Action is a deeply antisemitic, violent organisation whose fascist ideology and terrorist operations threaten British society. In February, a 17-year-old member of National Action walked free despite being convicted of preparing a bomb with which to spark an “all-out race war”. It was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Scottish Dawn and NS131 are both aliases of National Action. Scottish Dawn claims to be a “new identitarian social movement formed from various organisations in 2017 to develop a coherent conception of Scottish identity and secure its place within Scottish politics”. NS131, which also calls itself National Socialist Anti-Capitalist Action, claims to be “a platform dedicated to promoting and spreading [National Socialist] street art and physical propaganda”.

The Home Secretary said: “By extending the proscription of National Action, we are halting the spread of a poisonous ideology and stopping its membership from growing – protecting those who could be at risk of radicalisation.” Mark Rowley QPM, Head of National Counter Terrorism Policing, said it would help to “disrupt and tackle the growing threat from the extreme right-wing.”

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University of Edinburgh refuses to stop event with Miko Peled, who told Labour event that delegates should be allowed to deny Holocaust

The University of Edinburgh has refused to cancel an event with American-Israeli activist, Miko Peled, who demanded that delegates at the Labour Party Conference this week should have the freedom to engage in debate as to whether the Holocaust actually happened. The event is scheduled for 19:30 today at 50 George Square at Edinburgh University, and is being organised by the Scottish Palestine Forum.

Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the University administration to raise our concerns about Mr Peled and called for the event to be cancelled. The University responded by confirming that the event is to go ahead on the grounds of “allowing freedom of speech to flourish”.

This week, Mr Peled made national headlines by demanding at the Labour Party Conference that delegates should have the freedom to engage in debate as to whether the Holocaust actually happened at all. He said that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion.” He additionally reportedly proposed that Israelis should be treated like Nazis. His remarks prompted widespread condemnation from politicians and the media.

Mr Peled has form. For example on 23rd May 2016, speaking at an art gallery in Euston, London, Mr Peled reportedly alleged that the Labour Party’s antisemitism furore is being fabricated by “Zionists”, allegedly saying: “Everyone knows this entire antisemitism thing is nonsense”. At the same event, Mr Peled is also said to have alleged that Islamophobia is a strategic invention of “Zionists”, reportedly claiming: “If anyone has any doubt, that this entire Islamophobia thing isn’t coming directly from pro-Israeli groups, then excuse me you are out of your mind. Absolutely. And when you look at each case, individually you will see, the hand, the fingerprints of some Israeli lobby, some pro-Zionist groups.”

More recently, on 14th September 2016, Mr Peled tweeted about a new aid package granted to Israel by the United States, writing: “Then theyr surprised Jews have reputation 4being sleazy thieves. #apartheidisrael doesn’t need or deserve these $$.” In response, his forthcoming event hosted by the Princeton Committee on Palestine was cancelled on the basis that: “The last string of tweets are antisemitic and hateful, which are counterproductive to an educational event on the conflict.”

Mr Peled’s views have, in the past, engaged the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by both the Government of Scotland and the Government of the United Kingdom. We are therefore extremely disappointed by the University’s decision to defend Mr Peled’s freedoms without defending those of Jewish students.

If you are attending the event this evening, please contact campus@antisemitism.uk.

The University has released a statement saying: “We want our campus to be an environment that is safe and welcoming to all and do not accept racism or bigotry of any kind. The University is also committed to fostering an environment in which freedom of speech is allowed to flourish. The right to debate and express differing views is central to the University’s ethos – but it must be done with respect for others. We always seek to ensure such debates are conducted in an appropriate way in line with our own policies around dignity and respect and with regard to our obligations under the Equality Act.”

We have also asked Mr Peled to comment.

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Comment: Jeremy Corbyn’s big speech failed to mention the Labour Party’s big problem, and that tells us a great deal

This afternoon, Jeremy Corbyn delivered his keynote speech to the Labour Party Conference. For an hour and a half, he covered all manner of topics, from the economy to the abuse that Diane Abbott has suffered. However, his big speech failed to mention the Labour Party’s big problem.

The Labour Party has been cleaved in two since Mr Corbyn took power, with antisemites and their apologists on one side of the divide, and Jews and their defenders on the other.

Nobody has been more vocal than the antisemites. At the Labour Party Conference, they have clamoured for the right to deny the Holocaust. They have demanded that the Jewish grouping be expelled from the Party. They have demanded that Israelis be treated like Nazis. And when the media exposed them all, Len McCluskey, Ken Livingstone and Ken Loach took to the airwaves to claim that antisemitism is being faked. Mr McCluskey called it “game playing” to “undermine Jeremy Corbyn”. Mr Livingstone said that the stench of antisemitism merely came from a few rowdy social justice warriors who “just go over the top when they criticise Israel” before moving to what he considers to be the really critical topic of Labour Party Conference: “We need to resolve the issue of the Palestinians”. Mr Loach could not even bring himself to condemn those who want a debate about whether the Holocaust actually happened at all, telling an interviewer: “I think history is for all of us to discuss”. Against this backdrop, Jewish activists succeeded in securing a change of rules to make it easier to expel antisemites, but Messrs McCluskey, Livingstone and Loach merely rolled their eyes and asked: “What antisemites?”

The Jews too have been vocal, and their defenders even more so. The national media has devoted its front pages to this year’s episode of what should be the Labour Party Conference but is instead the annual antisemitism festival, where Jewish delegates feel unsafe and antisemites and their enablers get free reign and standing ovations. As the media has exposed putrid far-left antisemitism to the nation, decent people have stepped forward. The Labour leader of the Labour council which owns the venue used by the conference has told his own Party that they will not be permitted to return unless they can satisfy him that antisemitism will no longer be on the menu. The CEO of the country’s scrupulously fair and independent Equality and Human Rights Commission has demanded that the Labour Party prove that it is not racist. Veteran Labour MP John Cryer has said that his Party’s antisemitism problem is “redolent of the 1930s” and made his hair “stand on end”. And we at Campaign Against Antisemitism have produced a comprehensive database of antisemitism amongst candidates and officials in every political party to clearly evidence the exceptional nature and ugly details of the Labour Party’s antisemitism problem.

When two warring sides face each other, and there can be no compromise, leadership is needed. But there is no opportunity more frequently and deliberately missed, than the opportunity for Jeremy Corbyn to show leadership on antisemitism. After more cover ups than can be counted, and the Chakrabarti whitewash bought with the only peerage he has ever awarded, Mr Corbyn has been very clear in his intention. He will not lead when it comes to antisemitism. He will not even recognise what it is.

And yet even I permitted myself the faint hope that this year, some grown-up adviser might convince Mr Corbyn to say something expedient to show that he is at least nominally on the side of the Jews and their defenders, not the antisemites and their apologists.

But when the moment came for Mr Corbyn’s big speech, he failed to address the elephant on the Conference floor by declining to mention antisemitism once. By omitting to firmly rebuke antisemitism in his keynote speech, Mr Corbyn has encouraged those like Len McCluskey, Ken Loach and Ken Livingstone who say that antisemitism is being faked, whilst emboldening those who so brazenly perpetrate it. Antisemitic crime has been rising every year, and British Jews are increasingly fearful. There are no certainties anymore in politics, but of this I am sure: if Mr Corbyn comes to power, his Government will be just as blind to antisemitism as his Party, and antisemites in Britain will rub their hands the morning after the election, knowing that their dawn has finally broken. We know where it goes from there.

Gideon Falter is Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism

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Pensioner fined £250 for third offence of sending over 150 harassing letters, including references to “Zionist Jews” being a “death cult” and claiming they will “get us all killed”

James Evans, a 70-year-old pensioner from Worcester, has been fined for harassing Worcester MP Robin Walker after writing him over 150 letters which included references to “Zionist Jews” being a “death cult” and claims that they will “get us all killed in the Third World War.” He also said the Jews were “not a race.” Mr Evans was fined £250, despite him refusing to express remorse and the fact that this is his third conviction for a similar offence.

Mr Evans wrote over 150 letters to Mr Walker between 1st August and 25th November last year. Mr Evans, who represented himself, had previously admitted racially aggravated harassment against Mr Walker when he appeared at Worcester Crown Court to be sentenced.

It is Mr Evans’ third conviction for similar offences, one of which led to a restraining order preventing him from contacting staff at BBC Hereford and Worcester after he sent them 70 offensive letters. It was a restraining order he later breached.

Mr Walter even contacted Mr Evans in an attempt to stop the letters being sent, but he continued to send and hand deliver letters, sometimes several times a day.

Judge Pearce-Higgins asked Mr Evans: “What are you planning? Are you going to keep your thoughts to yourself and not send letters to different people and harass them?” Mr Evans responded: “What you are in effect saying is that I must not express views that you don’t approve of. It seems a bit like Stalinist Russia to me. If you don’t agree with people, define them as mentally ill or as criminals.”

In his sentencing remarks, Judge Pearce-Higgins gave Mr Evans credit for his early guilty plea. No restraining order was made because the judge felt it would be “unworkable.” Mr Walker reportedly also did not seek to stop Mr Evans contacting him, but believed contact should be limited to legitimate, constituency matters.

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends Mr Walker and the authorities for standing up against racism and antisemitism. However, we are disturbed that this recidivist antisemite has been let off with a slap on the wrist, in spite of his repeated offending. This sentence, like others we have recently seen, will hardly deter antisemites.

Image credit: Bill Nicholls

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Counter-terrorism police arrest eleven suspected members of far-right National Action terrorist group in nationwide swoop

Counter-terrorism police have arrested eleven suspected members of the far-right National Action terrorist group in a nationwide swoop. The suspect are all men aged between 23 and 35, and they were arrested on suspicion of offences ranging from preparation of a terrorist act through to membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation.

National Action is a deeply antisemitic, violent organisation whose fascist ideology and terrorist operations threaten British society. In February, a 17-year-old member of National Action walked free despite being convicted of preparing a bomb with which to spark an “all-out race war”. It was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Counter-terrorism police are now searching the suspects’ homes.

Detective Chief Superintendent Martin Snowden, head of the North East Counter Terrorism Unit, said: “Today’s arrests are part of coordinated action by the national counter-terrorism network and UK policing. Those who promote extreme right-wing views are looking to divide our communities and spread hatred. This will not be tolerated and those who do so must be brought to justice.”

The Senior National Coordinator for Counter Terrorism Policing, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu of the Metropolitan Police, said: “Counter-terror policing is committed to tackling all forms of extremism that threatens public safety and security. Investigations relating to alleged extreme right-wing activity are pursued with the same level or resource and vigour as other ideologies, in order to bring suspected offenders before the courts. Today’s arrests, while resulting from two separate investigations, have been coordinated by our officers across a number of forces. This maximises operational effectiveness for police and minimises disruption for the local communities.”

Nine men were arrested in England, including six in north-west England, two in West Yorkshire and one in Wiltshire. One of the men was already in prison. Two men were arrested in Wales.

The suspect are:

  • A 24-year-old man from Seaforth on suspicion of preparation of a terrorist act, funding terrorism and membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 23-year-old man from Newton-le-Willows on suspicion of preparation of a terrorist act, funding terrorism and membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 33-year-old man from Prescott on suspicion of preparation of a terrorist act, funding terrorism and membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 31-year-old man from Warrington on suspicion of preparation of a terrorist act, funding terrorism and membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 35-year-old man from Warrington on suspicion of preparation of a terrorist act, funding terrorism and membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 22-year-old man from Lancashire has been produced from prison for police interview on suspicion of preparation of a terrorist act and membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 28-year-old man from Swansea on suspicion of membership of a proscribed organisation and possession of terrorism material/documents;
  • A 23-year-old man from Sowerby Bridge on suspicion of membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 23-year-old-man from Swansea on suspicion of membership of a proscribed organisation;
  • A 26-year-old man from Leeds on suspicion of membership of a proscribed organisation; and
  • A 30-year-old man from Wiltshire on suspicion of membership of a proscribed organisation.

Three soldiers were charged with membership of National Action earlier in the month.

We thank the police for their constant vigilance.

We are following the case with interest.

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Daily Telegraph’s Digital Travel Editor publishes travel suggestions for countries whose central bank is not “controlled by the Rothschild family”

Presumably taking his cue from antisemitic conspiracy myths, the Daily Telegraph’s Digital Travel Editor, Oliver Smith, has published a list of the only three countries in the world which “don’t have a central bank owned or controlled by the Rothschild family”. According to Mr Smith, and antisemites all over the world, the three countries are Cuba, North Korea and Iran.

Antisemitic conspiracy myths have long placed the predominantly Jewish Rothschild family of bankers and philanthropists behind the world’s ills, accusing them of leading a global Jewish conspiracy. The myth gained widespread currency at the when the Nazis recognised its potency for turning Germans against the supposed hidden hand of the Jews, who their propaganda claimed was ruining Germany’s national future.

Modern use of the myth has often claimed that Cuba, North Korea and Iran are the only countries whose central bank is beyond the grasp of the Rothschilds, which supposedly is the reason for a media and military campaign for Western powers to dominate those alleged bastions of independence from Jewish hegemony.

Though the article has now been amended, the Daily Telegraph must immediately investigate this matter and act firmly. We are in contact with them.

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Ken Livingstone emerges from suspension over antisemitism to say Labour antisemites are just going “over the top when they criticise Israel”

Ken Livingstone, the disgraced former MP and Mayor of London, has entered the furore over antisemitism at the Labour Party Conference.

Mr Livingstone is currently serving a suspension from the Party over his repeated claims that “Hitler was supporting Zionism”, however he emerged to tell Talk Radio that claims of antisemitism are merely “distorted” by people like Labour MP Wes Streeting, who decried antisemitism at the Labour Party Conference.

He told Talk Radio: “Some people have made offensive comments, it doesn’t mean they’re inherently antisemitic and hate Jews. They just go over the top when they criticise Israel. The people criticising Israeli government policy aren’t criticising people who are Jewish in Britain.” Pushed to explain, he said “We need to resolve the issue of the Palestinians”, before being pressed to admit that British Jews have nothing to do with resolving Palestinian grievances.

Mr Livingstone has his own entry in Campaign Against Antisemitism’s database of antisemitism in political parties due to his long history of courting controversy on the topic and complaining that people making allegations of antisemitism are merely doing so in order to stifle criticism of the Israeli government. Indeed he has repeated the smear so many times that it has become known as the ‘Livingstone Formulation’.

Today has seen Brighton’s Labour Council leader write to inform the Party that it may be evicted from holding the Conference in Brighton Centre in future over antisemitism, demanding: “I will need reassurances that there will be no repeat of the behaviour and actions we have seen this week before any further bookings from the Party are taken.” The CEO of the UK’s Equality and Human Rights Commission has also intervened saying that Labour antisemitism is now so bad that the Party must “establish that it is not a racist party”.

Yesterday, at a Labour Party Conference fringe event that was advertised in official literature, speakers demanded the right to deny the Holocaust to loud cheering, and called for the Jewish grouping within the Labour Party to be expelled, prompting spontaneous calls of “throw them out”.

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Leader of Unite union must apologise or resign for claiming antisemitism is “mood music” to undermine Jeremy Corbyn, and praising group whose spokeswoman laughs at antisemitism

The leader of the Unite union, Len McCluskey, has told the BBC that claims of antisemitism in the Labour Party are “mood music” to “undermine Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership” and that people who allege it have been “playing games”. He also said that Jewish Voice for Labour, a fringe organisation which hijacks the voice of Jewish Labour members is “great” and “radical” even after its spokeswoman, Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, spent the morning failing to control her laughter when asked on LBC about antisemitism in the Party.

Earlier today we released research showing that antisemitism amongst Labour officials is eight times higher than in any other party, which follows the revelation by a senior MP that as many as 5,000 cases are awaiting decisions by its compliance unit.

The day has been peppered with highly concerning news from the conference floor, including Jewish delegates saying that they feel extremely uncomfortable and unwelcome.

Today has also seen Brighton’s Labour Council leader write to inform the Party that it may be evicted from holding the Conference in Brighton Centre in future over antisemitism, demanding: “I will need reassurances that there will be no repeat of the behaviour and actions we have seen this week before any further bookings from the Party are taken.” The CEO of the UK’s Equality and Human Rights Commission has also intervened saying that Labour antisemitism is now so bad that the Party must “establish that it is not a racist party”.

They were responding to a Labour Party Conference fringe event last night that was advertised in official literature, at which speakers demanded the right to deny the Holocaust to loud cheering, and called for the Jewish grouping within the Labour Party to be expelled, prompting spontaneous calls of “throw them out”.

The Labour Party Conference has just passed new rules to make it easier to expel antisemites from the Party, but they will be meaningless unless the Party calls out antisemites using the International Definition of Antisemitism, as well as people like Mr McCluskey, who is a key ally of Jeremy Corbyn, who not only claim that there is no antisemitism problem, but also claim that Jews who complain about it are pursuing a secret political agenda, such as defending Israel or attacking Jeremy Corbyn.

Tonight, Mr McCluskey has subjected Jewish victims of antisemitism to a secondary attack by claiming that they are part of political game-playing to undermine the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn.

He should apologise immediately or resign.

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We welcome new rules passed by Labour Party Conference to make it easier to expel antisemites, but now the Party must walk the walk, not just talk the talk

With great reluctance, Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party has just passed a motion allowing greater sanctions against antisemites in its ranks.

However, this welcome change will prove meaningless unless the Party rejects those parts of the whitewash Chakrabarti report that allow for a veil of secrecy to be drawn over all disciplinary proceedings: at present, the Labour party can decide in secret that its members are not antisemitic, and if that is allowed to continue, then all the definitions and penalties in all the world will not improve its record on tackling Jew-hatred.

Earlier today we released research showing that antisemitism amongst Labour officials is eight times higher than in any other party, which follows the revelation by a senior MP that as many as 5,000 cases are awaiting decisions by its compliance unit. Today has also seen Brighton’s Labour Council leader write to inform the Party that it may be evicted from holding the Conference in Brighton Centre in future over antisemitism, and the CEO of the UK’s Equality and Human Rights Commission has said that Labour antisemitism is now so bad that the Party must prove that it is not racist. The day has been peppered with highly concerning news from the conference floor, including Jewish delegates saying that they feel extremely uncomfortable and unwelcome.

We call on Labour, and all political parties, to adopt our Manifesto for fighting Antisemitism in Political Parties, which sets out rules by which they can deal swiftly, transparently and effectively with antisemitism in their ranks.

The Labour Party must also respect the right of British Jews to define what antisemitism is, as enshrined in the ‘Macpherson principle’, which is one of the cornerstones of race relations in Britain. The Party must also punish the use of the so-called ‘Livingstone Formulation’, in which complaints of antisemitism are countered with claims that the complainant has a secret political agenda such as defending Israel or attacking Jeremy Corbyn, visiting on Jews the double indignity of being both the victims of racism and the victims of secondary attack for pointing out that racism.

When the Jewish community of this country hears Mr Corbyn embrace the International Definition of Antisemitism and call a halt to the deployment of the Livingstone Formulation in the Labour Party, and we hear an apology from him for his own personal failures in this regard, the Jewish community might start to believe the Labour Party is serious about opposing antisemitism.

Today’s rule change will prove to be yet another great Labour antisemitism whitewash if the Party does not now take swift, transparent and decisive action. If the Labour Party wants to shed its well-earned reputation for accepting Jew-hatred, it will have to walk the walk, not talk the talk.

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Beinazir Lasharie, who reportedly linked Zionists to ISIS, appointed Deputy Mayor of Kensington and Chelsea to help “rebuild trust with residents”

Councillor Beinazir Lasharie, who reportedly said that “I’ve seen compelling evidence that links Zionists to ISIS” has been appointed Deputy Mayor of Kensington and Chelsea “to help the Council rebuild trust with residents following the tragedy at Grenfell Tower.”

In February 2015, Councillor Lasharie reportedly posted a video on Facebook entitled: “ISIS: Israeli Secret Intelligence Service”, commenting on it: “Many people know about who was behind 9/11 and also who is behind ISIS. I’ve nothing against Jews..just sharing it.” When questioned by journalists she reportedly said: “I’ve seen compelling evidence that links Zionists to ISIS.”

It was initially reported that Labour had suspended Councillor Lasharie for her comments but Kensington Labour later said that she had been reinstated as “the Labour Councillor for Notting Dale” and confirmed that, following an investigation, her suspension was lifted in December 2015. However, this was contradicted by reports in March 2016 that she had not been suspended after all. Ms Lasharie’s status at this time is unknown, owing to the conditions of secrecy imposed by the Chakrabarti report.

Councillor Lasharie’s appointment as Deputy Mayor came to light when Campaign Against Antisemitism asked Councillor Lasharie to comment on her previous comments on social media as part of our research into antisemitism in political parties. We received a lengthy statement from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in response, stating that Councillor Lasharie, who lives near Grenfell Tower, agreed to be Deputy Mayor “to help the Council rebuild trust with residents following the tragedy at Grenfell Tower.” It added that “She will help the Council build new connections and bring new voices to the Council, as well as strengthening the ties we already value with many groups and individuals across the Royal Borough.”

Regarding the allegations, it said that “Following an investigation by the Labour Group, disciplinary charges against Councillor Lasharie were dropped. It was important that these allegations were investigated in full, recommendations were drawn up which did not include disciplinary action and Councillor Lasharie was reinstated to the Labour Group.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has written to Councillor Elizabeth Campbell, the leader of the Council, to make her aware of the matter and to seek her response. Councillor Campbell can be contacted at cllr.e.campbell@rbkc.gov.uk.

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UK Equality and Human Rights Commission CEO says Labour antisemitism is so bad that the Party must now prove it is not racist

In an astonishing intervention, the CEO of the United Kingdom’s Equality and Human Rights Commission, Rebecca Hilsenrath, has demanded that the Labour Party prove “that it is not a racist party”.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission, whose role was established by the Equality Act 2006, is independent of the Government and is responsible for “safeguarding and enforcing the laws that protect people’s rights to fairness, dignity and respect.”

Ms Hilsenrath was responding to a Labour Party Conference fringe event that was advertised in official literature, speakers demanded the right to deny the Holocaust to loud cheering, and called for the Jewish grouping within the Labour Party to be expelled, prompting spontaneous calls of “throw them out”.

In a statement, Ms Hilsenrath said: “Antisemitism is racism and the Labour party needs to do more to establish that it is not a racist party. A zero-tolerance approach to antisemitism should mean just that. When senior party figures are saying there’s a problem, then the leadership should take swift action. It is simply not acceptable to say they oppose these views. These comments by party members show more needs to be done to root out antisemitic views that clearly exist in the party. Any suggestion of kicking people out of any political party on the grounds of race or religion should be condemned.”

In a separate development, the leader of Brighton and Hove City Council, Labour Councillor Warren Morgan, has also demanded proof that the his own Party can be trusted not to be antisemitic, otherwise the Council will ban the Labour Party Conference from being held at its convention centre again in the future. Writing to the General Secretary of the Labour Party, Iain McNicol, Councillor Morgan demanded: “I will need reassurances that there will be no repeat of the behaviour and actions we have seen this week before any further bookings from the Party are taken.”

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Labour Party may be banned from holding its annual conference at Brighton Centre permanently over antisemitism

The Labour Party has been told to provide assurances over antisemitism to Brighton and Hove City Council by one of its own councillors, or face a ban from using the Brighton Centre in the future. The Labour Party is currently holding its iconic annual conference at the Brighton Centre, which is owned by the Council.

Warren Morgan, who is leader of Brighton and Hove City Council, and himself a Labour councillor, has written to the General Secretary of the Labour Party, Iain McNicol, demanding: “I will need reassurances that there will be no repeat of the behaviour and actions we have seen this week before any further bookings from the Party are taken.”

After thanking the Labour Party for “the business that Conference brings to our hotels, restaurants and shops”, Councillor Morgan firmly raised his concerns, writing: “I am however very concerned at the antisemitism being aired publicly in fringe meetings and on the floor of Conference. We have a significant Jewish community in Brighton and Hove, and I met with them only last week to discuss the antisemitism already on our streets, causing them fear and alarm. We have the prominent activist and suspended Labour Party member Tony Greenstein here, who indeed was present at the fringe meeting where it was suggested that Holocaust denial should be allowed. His expulsion, in my view, is long overdue.”

Councillor Morgan continued: “As the Labour leader of Brighton and Hove City Council I will undoubtedly face questions as to why we allow any event where antisemitic views are freely expressed to happen in the city, particularly on council premises. As a Labour Party member I expect the enquiry announced today to take firm action; as Leader I will need reassurances that there will be no repeat of the behaviour and actions we have seen this week before any further bookings from the Party are taken. I must apply the same standards to Labour as I would to any other Party Conference or political event; whilst none of us can control what is said at meetings we do not run, I have to make the strongest possible representation on behalf of the residents of the city who are Jewish. We are a City of Sanctuary and I have to speak up against any form of racism as and when it is given a platform in the city.”

Following the events we have seen unfolding at the Labour Party conference, including reports from Jewish delegates that they feel uncomfortable being Jewish at the conference, Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Councillor Morgan’s principled stand. Speaking out in this way and standing up for his Jewish constituents is the right thing to do, and the way that he has done so, publicly and firmly, is nothing short of heroic.

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Tense scenes and dismay from Jewish delegates at Labour Party Conference as vote awaited on new rules making it easier to expel antisemites from the Party

The atmosphere is tense after an at times raucous debate at the Labour Party Conference on whether to adopt new rules which would make it easier to expel antisemites.

Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, of the Jewish Voices for Labour group, said those seeking changes should “be careful”. She also claimed that those promoting the rule change had been briefing the Daily Mail and the Daily Telegraph, to loud approval from the conference floor, but booing from the journalists gathered in the media centre, and the Daily Telegraph’s tweet chief political correspondent felt compelled to that Jewish Labour members were not briefing him. Ms Wimborne-Indrissi has her own section in our research into antisemitism in political parties, which we launched earlier today.

One Jewish Labour activist reported that leaflets were being passed around the conference floor demanding the expulsion of the Jewish Labour Movement from the Party, whilst Izzy Lenga, the Vice President of the National Union of Students tweeted: “I didn’t think it was possible, but I feel a whole lot more unsafe, uncomfortable and upset as a Jew on [the Labour Party Conference] floor right now than I do at NUS”.

The proposed rule change to make expelling antisemites easier could have already been voted on earlier, had activists not spent an hour attacking the proposals. Indeed, the proposals should have been debated by the Labour Party Conference a year ago, but they were shelved without explanation.

The attacks on and dismissal of Jews in Labour who make allegations of antisemitism was also exposed in the media earlier in the day, when Ms Wimborne-Indrissi could not control her laughter when questioned about antisemitism in the Labour Party during an interview on LBC. Later on, filmmaker Ken Loach, who made the official Labour Party video and is an activist within a group called “Free Speech on Israel” told the BBC’s Daily Politics show that allegations of antisemitism were a fallacy “without validation or any evidence” despite the fact that Campaign Against Antisemitism has just published detailed evidence.

Yesterday, a packed conference fringe event run by “Free Speech on Israel” reportedly heard from American-Israeli activist, Miko Peled, that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion”, for which he was cheered, and the audience began cheering and chanting when another speaker demanded that the Jewish Labour Movement be expelled from the Labour Party.

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Shadow Emergency Services Minister Chris Williamson MP allegedly praised Jackie Walker and said her suspension was “disgraceful”

Chris Williamson, the Member of Parliament for Derby North and Shadow Fire and Emergency Services Minister, has defended disgraced suspended Labour activist Jackie Walker according to a post by Ms Walker on Facebook.

Ms Walker posted a photo on Facebook from the Labour Conference hugging Mr Williamson along with a message of solidarity: “Chris Williamson, Shadow Fire and Emergency Services Minister — practised my courage and said the way I had been treated was dreadful. I agree!!!” We assume that Ms Walker meant “praised” instead of “practised”.

We have sought a comment from Mr Williamson, who has so far not replied.

Ms Walker was suspended by Labour in September 2016 following comments she made about Holocaust Memorial Day at the Labour Party Conference. Ms Walker said that Holocaust Memorial Day is not inclusive enough and that Jewish schools do not need special security in the face of threats. She reportedly claimed that antisemitism was being “exaggerated” and that the “aim of such allegations is to undermine Jeremy [Corbyn].” She also claimed that “many Jews”  were the “chief financiers” of the African slave trade.

Mr Williamson to the Guardian in August that the controversy surrounding Jeremy Corbyn’s handling of antisemitism within Labour was “proxy wars and bulls***”. He went on to say: “I’m not saying [antisemitism] never ever happens but it is a really dirty, lowdown trick, particularly the antisemitism smears. Many people in the Jewish community are appalled by what they see as the weaponisation of antisemitism for political ends. It is pretty repellent to use that to attack somebody like Jeremy Corbyn, who has spent his whole life fighting for social justice and standing up for the underdog. But I feel people have stopped listening to the smears and lies and dirty tricks…”

Ms Walker will also be performing her one-person show, “The Lynching” on the fringe of the Labour Party Conference. The show purports to expose the “witch hunt” she says she has been subjected to over allegations of antisemitism. Labour MP John Mann attacked her performance as a “sad and miserable way of hiding from antisemitism”.

Ms Walker is believed to be suspended from the Labour Party and awaiting a disciplinary hearing, which makes her warm embrace from Mr Williamson and the fact that she is staging her show all the more perturbing.

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New CAA research shows antisemitism amongst officials in Labour is eight times worse than any other party

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism has published the initial findings of a comprehensive ongoing research project to track antisemitism amongst office holders in political parties, comprising MPs, peers, councillors, party officers and candidates selected to contest any public election. The International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government and the College of Policing, and the deployment of the so-called ‘Livingstone formulation’ has guided our research. Our researchers used a supercomputer to analyse four million social media posts by more than two thousand parliamentary candidates, together with a review of our private logs and publicly available reports of allegations of antisemitism amongst office holders.

Our findings show that Labour Party office holders account for 61% of the cases of alleged antisemitism, which is nearly eight times higher than the number of office holders in the second-placed parties.

80% of cases were in parties of the progressive left, namely Labour, the Greens, the SNP and the Liberal Democrats. In all cases, the parties also had poor track records for addressing allegations of antisemitism.

The supposedly anti-racist Labour Party has shamed itself by failing to firmly and consistently address antisemitism, even proving incapable of expelling a Holocaust revisionist, a senior MP who said that “Jewish money” controls the Conservative Party, and another prominent official who claimed that Jews were “among the chief financiers of the slave trade”. The Labour Party has compounded its antisemitism problem by shrouding all disciplinary matters in secrecy under guidelines introduced in the wake of Baroness Chakrabarti’s report into antisemitism, thus concealing the fact that it has failed to address antisemitism within its ranks.

Our analysis of the Liberal Democrats confirms that prominent and egregious antisemites have been allowed to remain as office holders in the party for many years after allegations were made.

Our analysis of antisemitic discourse amongst Green Party office holders indicates that, in common with their counterparts in the Labour Party, they seem to have little or no consciousness of the nature of post-Holocaust antisemitism, so that even parliamentary candidates have been repeating antisemitic myths without inhibition.

It is concerning that four of the five UKIP representatives who feature in our report have neither been publicly and transparently investigated nor disciplined by the party.

Only two SNP representatives feature in our report. We believe that the party could and should have taken stronger action against both.

The Conservative Party is not immune from criticism, having failed to discipline a sitting MP who referred to the supposed “power of the Jewish lobby in America”.

The extreme-right has largely ceased to function politically, and is now largely confined to non-political criminal activity. Thus the BNP and Patria, while undoubtedly harbouring racist views, have fielded very few candidates in the last few years. Campaign Against Antisemitism continues to pursue cases against neo-Nazis in court, and played a leading role in the proscription of National Action.

Set against a background of identity politics and a hair-trigger sensitivity to racism elsewhere, Campaign Against Antisemitism believe it is astonishing that 64 officials of any political parties would feel able to use a public platform and the authority of their parties for the dissemination of racism against one single group, still less that their parties would be so relaxed as to mostly fail to discipline them effectively. Out of all 64 cases, only five cases (6.3%) were effectively and transparently dealt with.

The Labour Party intends to vote on Tuesday on a motion to strengthen the sanctions against antisemites found in its ranks. However, Campaign Against Antisemitism notes the repeated failures of Labour to apply existing sanctions, the inability of the leadership to recognise post-Holocaust antisemitism, and the secrecy surrounding all disciplinary cases as recommended by the Chakrabarti report. Unless these matters are addressed, new measures will be meaningless.

Our research does not claim to be exhaustive: there may be other cases that we are not aware of. We are confident, however, that our research has been sufficiently broad to give a realistic picture of how the various political parties are dealing with antisemitism, or failing to deal with it.

The research does not include rank and file party members who do not hold any office. We have included in our research any office holders who have been subject to clearly evidenced allegations of antisemitism, have deployed the so-called ‘Livingstone formulation’, or have posted antisemitic content to their social media accounts.

Our research and the results of the review are now catalogued on our website, where they will remain and be updated, providing a resource for journalists and researchers seeking to understand and monitor discourse among those holding office in the UK’s political parties. A form will be available to allow members of the public to notify us of new incidents.

The research follows polling released by Campaign Against Antisemitism last month which revealed that 76% of British Jews felt that recent political events have resulted in increased hostility towards Jews, with 83% saying that the Labour Party is too tolerant of antisemitism among their MPs, members and supporters. 78% had witnessed antisemitism that was disguised as a political comment about Israel or Zionism.

At a time when it would seem unthinkable for an elected official of a political party to publicly make a racist statement against other minority communities, it seems acceptable in many parties to make such statements about Jews. We call on all parties to sign up to the transparent disciplinary processes set out in our Manifesto for Fighting Antisemitism in Political Parties.

Our most striking finding is not just that the supposedly ‘anti-racist’ Labour Party stands shamelessly above other parties in the number of incidents, but that it has failed to take meaningful action against brazen offenders. We often hear in Labour’s defence that cases of antisemitism are isolated, but this research shows the degree to which the rot has become widespread amongst senior figures.

Any political party wishing to be taken seriously as an anti-racist party must treat antisemitism with zero tolerance and expel offenders publicly and transparently. Actions, as ever, will speak louder than words, and we will judge all political parties by how they now address the cases our research has highlighted.

You can read more by visiting our new online database of antisemitism in political parties.

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Calls to allow Holocaust denial and expel the Jewish Labour Movement electrify Labour Conference fringe event

Calls by speakers at a Labour Conference fringe event to allow Holocaust denial and expel the Jewish Labour Movement from the Labour Party were reportedly met with rowdy applause and cheering earlier today.

The packed event run by “Free Speech on Israel” heard from American-Israeli activist Miko Peled that people should be free to ask “Holocaust, yes or no” because “there should be no limits on the discussion”, for which he was cheered.

Michael Kalmanovitz, a member of the International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network, reportedly asserted that claims of increasing antisemitism were intended to undermine Jeremy Corbyn and the left, before demanding that the Jewish Labour Movement be expelled from the Labour Party. He reportedly said: “The thing is, if you support Israel, you support apartheid. So what is the JLM [Jewish Labour Movement] and Labour Friends of Israel doing in our party — kick them out”, to raucous cheering and calls of “throw them out”.

Ironically for an organisation called “Free Speech on Israel”, the organisers reportedly ordered attendees not to tweet or take photographs for fear of “hostile coverage” whilst leaflets were passed around claiming that concerns about rising antisemitism were a “manufactured moral panic”.

The event was also reportedly addressed by Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi, who had earlier been given a standing ovation by the Labour Party Conference plenary for stating that “There is no problem with Jews in the Labour Party”, and notorious antisemite Tony Greenstein, who was among a number of attendees able to attend and participate despite being currently or previously suspended from the Labour Party over allegations of antisemitism.

Labour MP Wes Streeting said: “This is not a question to which there is any other answer than ‘the Holocaust is one of the greatest crimes in human history and this should never happen again’. There are plenty of far-right websites where you can peddle hatred. The fringe of the Labour Party isn’t the place to have that discussion.” However it seems that large numbers of Labour Party activists disagreed and thronged the event, pouring out of the door to the room and into the corridor outside. The high attendance will doubtless have been helped by the fact that the event was advertised in official Labour Party Conference literature.

In another room, Labour MP John Cryer told delegates that some of what is written “makes your hair stand up”, saying “This stuff is redolent of the 1930s.”

It is repugnant to see a thronged officially-advertised fringe event at the Labour Party Conference at which Labour supporters cheered in favour of freedom for Holocaust deniers, and chanted their approval for censoring and expelling Jews and ‘Zionists’. It is a reminder of how low the Labour Party has plunged.

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“Labour Party Marxists” allege Nazi-Zionist collaboration and urge “counterattack” against allegations of antisemitism in article distributed at Labour Party Conference

Labour Party Marxists have published an article titled “Anti-Zionism does not equal antisemitism” in which they defend Ken Livingstone arguing that “the point he was making about the Nazi regime and Zionism is basically correct”, dedicating an entire section to “Nazi collaboration”. They have reportedly been handing out this article at their stall at the current Labour Conference in Brighton and have published the article on their website.

The article, written by Moshe Machover, alleges that “the Jewish Labour Movement and the right wing media have been running a completely cynical campaign. The whole campaign of equating opposition to Zionism with antisemitism has, in fact, been carefully orchestrated with the help of the Israeli government and the far-right in the United States.”

Machover has previously been exposed for suggesting that Hamas should adopt tactics more akin to those of Hizballah. Both are genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations which are proscribed under the Terrorism Act. He also reportedly accused Jewish students at an event at Queen Mary, University of London, of being under the control of the Israeli Embassy.

The article concludes: “we must go on the counterattack against the current slurs. It is correct to expose Zionism as a movement based on both colonisation and collusion with antisemitism. Don’t apologise for saying this.”

According to their aims and principles, “The central aim of Labour Party Marxists is to transform the Labour Party into an instrument for working class advance and international socialism.” Their website, however, shows an emphasis on dismissing claims of antisemitism, with separate sections on antisemitism and on the “witchhunt” both of which show a large focus on dismissing the concerns of the Jewish community.

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German federal government adopts International Definition of Antisemitism following independent review of measures against antisemitism

The German federal government, the Bundeskabinett, has today formally adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism. The definition is clear and detailed, leaving no doubt as to what antisemitism is. In particular, the definition tackles the full spectrum of antisemitism, from ancient slurs to conspiracy myths to antisemitism in discourse about Israel.

Thomas de Maizière, the German Interior Minister, told Deutsche Welle: “We Germans are particularly vigilant when our country is threatened by an increase in antisemitism. History made clear to us, in the most terrible way, the horrors to which antisemitism can lead.” The cabinet adopted the definition at it regular weekly meeting, and has recommended that public officials including law enforcement use the definition. The move came in response to an independent commission on antisemitism which recommended that the International Definition of Antisemitism be adopted. A member of the commission, parliamentarian Volker Beck, told Deutsche Welle that the adoption of the definition should be seen as a “first step” which would help formalise measures ranging from “legal prosecution to educational measures to the sensitisation of the judicial system”. Deidre Berger, the director of the Berlin Ramer Institute for German-Jewish Relations of the American Jewish Committee gave Deutsche Welle examples of antisemitism being “all too often ignored in recent years”, citing an incident in which “the courts considered an arson attack on a synagogue in Wuppertal as non-antisemitic”.

The formal adoption of the definition was also praised by officials of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance who have been urging the alliance’s 31 member states to formalise the domestic use of the definition.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Sir Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings. Austria became the next national government to adopt the definition, followed by the Romanian government, and now the German government has done the same.

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Our reflections on the past year on the occasion of Jewish new year, Rosh Hashanah

Tonight, Jewish families around the world will start to celebrate Jewish new year, Rosh Hashanah. It seems like a good moment to reflect upon our work over the past year. We have had an incredibly busy year, and that is both a good and a bad thing.

First the good. Almost 700 people are now registered to volunteer with us, a growing number of whom are not Jewish, which we find hugely encouraging. To support our growing team of volunteers we have expanded from one part-timer to two exceptional full-time members of staff, and we are investing time and money in sophisticated systems (and cybersecurity) to manage our projects and the network of volunteers who work on them. Our work with Downing Street continues to bear fruit, including the British Government’s agreement to become the first in the world to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism. Our strong relationship with the Home Office has also produced results, such as the first ever ban on a far-right terrorist group, National Action. Our lawyers have held the authorities to account, winning our 13-month High Court legal battle against the Crown Prosecution Service over a decision not to prosecute, launching our first private prosecution, and producing expert guidance for Government bodies, regulators and universities on the application of the definition of antisemitism. We published new research on the prevalence and effects of antisemitism, and antisemitic crime and prosecutions. We have helped those who seek our assistance to secure criminal and professional sanctions for antisemites, and those results have been widely reported in the media, sending a clear message to other antisemites that we are working to ensure that their hatred has severe consequences. Our team has also travelled the country, speaking to Jewish communities about what action they can take against antisemitism, and educating the non-Jewish public about the threat to society that antisemitism poses. Campaign Against Antisemitism is now three years old and has developed an excellent reputation, so we are privileged to have secured the support of our distinguished Honorary Patrons, public figures who stand with us in our fight against antisemitism.

The bad news is that our work is increasingly necessary and urgent. Our research showed that antisemitic crime surged by 45% between 2014 and 2016, whilst prosecutions remained at a paltry level. We are hearing from more and more people affected by antisemitism, many of whom never imagined that they would experience it in their lifetime, and that when they did experience it, they would have such difficulty in obtaining justice from the authorities. We have also seen disturbing violent manifestations of antisemitic hatred, including the firebombing of two kosher restaurants, and a man chasing Jews down the street armed with a meat cleaver and machete, shouting antisemitic abuse. We remain extremely disturbed by the way in which antisemitism in major political parties, especially the Labour Party, remains unaddressed. Our work relating to police forces, prosecutors, regulators, universities and political parties is increasingly urgent, and we are lucky to continue to recruit outstandingly talented and committed volunteers to take on this difficult work.

We would like to end on a very positive note: for the past three years, we have worked with YouGov to measure antisemitic prejudice in Britain. Whilst antisemitic crime is increasing alarmingly rapidly, antisemitic sentiment amongst non-Jewish Britons is in decline. That means that, British people are increasingly thinking about and rejecting antisemitism. Antisemitic hatred has been growing all over Europe, but in Britain, uniquely, antisemitism is falling, although we still have a long way to go. We believe that our media strategy of talking about antisemitism and raising it as an urgent national issue is one of the factors leading a significant number of British people to think about and fulsomely reject antisemitism. In the next few days, weeks and months, you will continue to see our work and its impact in the news.

Our campaign is run by volunteers like you and our staff of two and our office are funded by people like you. We will do whatever it takes to secure the future of British Jews and protect British society from the poisonous ideology of antisemitism. To succeed, we rely on people like you to volunteer or give a regular monthly donation, so if you haven’t already supported us in this way, please play your part by donating monthly or volunteering today.

On this Jewish new year, on behalf of everyone at Campaign Against Antisemitism, we wish all of our supporters, Jewish and non-Jewish, a happy, healthy, safe and successful year ahead. It is thanks to your support and solidarity that we can be hopeful for the future.

Cover image credit: Facsimile Editions

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Brent Council adopts diluted definition of antisemitism after Labour Councillor and fringe Jewish activists conflate antisemitism with criticism of Israel

Brent Council in London has voted in a lengthy meeting to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, however councillors have overwhelmingly decided to water the definition down, as well as voting that Jewish rights to self-determination should only be recognised alongside Palestinian rights. The decision was strongly opposed by three Jewish residents who said that Jewish people did not want the definition to be passed.

The motion to adopt the definition was proposed by Conservative Councillor Joel Davidson, using the same wording used by the British Government, the College of Policing, and governments and organisations around the world. On behalf of the Labour group on the Council, Councillor Neil Nerva backed the motion but expressed concern that the definition might create a “hierarchy of hate crime”, so he proposed a second motion which expressed generic opposition to hate crime, to be passed alongside Councillor Davidson’s motion adopting the definition.

However, Labour Councillor Shafique Choudhury gained the support of most of his Labour colleagues and a majority of councillors in his effort to rewrite the definition to make some Jewish rights contingent on Palestinian rights. Whereas Councillor Davidson’s motion stated that “The guidelines highlight manifestations of antisemitism as including…”, Councillor Choudhury’s more equivocal amendment was adopted, stating that “The guidelines highlight possible manifestations of antisemitism as sometimes including…”. Furthermore, Councillor Choudhury gained support for his idea to replace a sentence stating that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour” is antisemitic, with a version demanding recognition for Palestinian rights, replacing the sentence with his alternative wording that “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination alongside Palestinian rights of self determination” is antisemitic.

Brent Council also heard from three Jewish men who attacked the notion of adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, with one of them even branding the proposal as an “insult”, despite the definition already having been adopted by many other councils, as well as the London Assembly and the Greater Manchester Combined Authority. All three men claimed that the definition would be used to stifle criticism of Israel, despite the definition clearly stating that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.”

Speaking out against the proposal, Rabbi Dr Frank Dabba Smith of Liberal Judaism’s Mosaic Synagogue decried “witch hunts and hateful rhetoric directed towards Jews like me” for criticising the “policies of the State of Israel”. He also criticised the attention being given to antisemitism, saying: “I am very aware that Islamophobia and hatred towards Muslims is much worse than antisemitism in this country”.

David Kaye, who identified himself as a Jewish resident and Labour Party member said that he had come to speak out against the definition. He said that he was representing many Jewish friends and colleagues who felt that adopting the definition would be unnecessary, claiming that the definition was hardly a definition at all because its terms were so vague, despite the definition having been checked and validated in a legal opinion commissioned by Campaign Against Antisemitism. He said that there is “no connection” between antisemitism and the State of Israel, in spite of plentiful evidence to the contrary, and that use of the word “trope” by those proposing the adoption of the definition was “playing tricks” by suggesting that some people opposing Israel might be “secretly” antisemitic and using coded language, even though some clearly do. Mr Kaye also warned councillors that Zionism did not have the support of all Jews, and that debating the resolution was “divisive” and “an insult”.

Mr Kaye was followed by Michael Coleman, who said that he was “from an orthodox Jewish family”, who claimed that he was representing many Jewish families who opposed adopting the definition on the basis that it may “chill free speech”, may be used to attack “[Jeremy] Corbyn and the left” and would be used to “defend the State of Israel from criticism”. He claimed that those promoting the definition did not speak for British Jews, but that he did.

Brent Council’s vote on adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism was turned into a fiasco by people who appeared to be more obsessed with the politics of the Middle East than surging antisemitic crime in Britain. It is deeply regrettable that the debate was hijacked by such people, including Jews who represent a minority view which they claim is widely held, who have successfully ensured that instead of adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, Brent Council has now adopted its own diluted version.

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Unite the union hires former Labour candidate Vicki Kirby, who said Jews have “big noses” and Hitler is the “Zionist G-d”

Update: Unite has now told us that Vicki Kirby does not presently work for the union, but they would not confirm whether she did work for them in the past, or when and why she may have left.

Vicki Kirby, who was twice suspended from the Labour Party over allegations of antisemitism has now reportedly been appointed by Unite, the union, as a regional officer, according to political blog Guido Fawkes.

Ms Kirby twice stood as a parliamentary candidate for the Labour Party and was Vice-Chair of its Woking branch. In 2014 she was suspended by the Labour Party after the Sunday Times and political blog Guido Fawkes exposed a number of tweets in which she wrote “What do you know [about] Jews? They have big noses and support Spurs”, said that Hitler was the “Zionist G-d” and Zionists’ “teacher”, and proposed that ISIS should attack Israel. After she remained active within the Party, Ms Kirby was suspended again following an outcry from Labour MPs.

Ms Kirby has been found repeatedly making antisemitic comments. If true, it is a disgrace that she has been recruited by Unite. Members may wish to contact the union’s Executive Council to express their concerns.

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Former commander of British forces in Afghanistan and former Archbishop of Canterbury become Honorary Patrons of CAA

We are delighted to announce that the former Archbishop of Canterbury, and the former commander of British forces in Afghanistan have become Honorary Patrons of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The Rt Rev. and Rt Hon. Dr The Lord Carey of Clifton PC RVC GBE FRSA served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1991 to 2002. Both during his tenure as Archbishop of Canterbury and since, Lord Carey has spoken out firmly against antisemitism and worked tirelessly to strengthen bonds between Christians and Jews. Lord Carey led efforts to deepen the Church of England’s involvement in Holocaust commemoration, and has devoted many addresses to discussion of the lessons of the Holocaust. He is Honorary President of the International Council of Christians and Jews and in 2016 he delivered the Simon Wiesenthal Centre’s important Dorothy Gardner Adler State of Antisemitism Lecture.

Colonel Richard Kemp CBE served in the British Army from 1977 to 2006. He was commander of British forces in Afghanistan and completed fourteen operational tours of duty around the world, including in Iraq, the Balkans and Northern Ireland. His last years of service were spent in the Cabinet Office where he headed the international terrorism intelligence team and was chairman of the COBRA Intelligence Group. Having retired from the army, Colonel Kemp is now a writer whose expertise is frequently sought by national and international news media. He also consults companies on leadership, security, intelligence, counter-terrorism and defence and is a public speaker in each of these areas. Having taken a professional interest in extremism, Colonel Kemp recognised the links between extremism and antisemitism, and the threat that antisemitism therefore poses to society. He has been giving his time to campaigns to raise awareness about antisemitism since his retirement and is well known as a staunch friend of the Jewish people.

They join our existing Honorary Patrons, The Rt Hon. The Baron Ahmad of Wimbledon, Bob Blackman MPThe Baroness Deech of Cumnor DBEMike Freer MPJonathan Goldberg QCFabian Hamilton MP, Brian Kennelly QCThe Baron Mitchell of HampsteadDr Matthew Offord MP and The Rt Hon. Sir Eric Pickles.

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Facebook, Twitter and Google must use their antisemite profiling technology to expel bigots instead of selling ads

Following the discovery that Facebook’s advertising algorithm offered advertisers the opportunity to target categories of users whose views were summarised as “Jew hater”, “How to burn Jews”, or “History of ‘why Jews ruin the world’”, it has now emerged that Twitter and Google also provide an means of targeting antisemites on their platforms.

Twitter has now been found offering a means of targeting almost 19 million users who might be particularly interested in hearing about a “Nazi” offering, and Google has been exposed for suggesting “good quality” keywords to antisemitic advertisers such as “the evil Jew”, “Jewish parasite”, “Jews control the media” and “Jewish control of banks”.

It comes as no surprise whatsoever that these titans of social networking and search can identify antisemites easily: their businesses are driven by their ability to reach huge numbers of people, and profile those people precisely enough to allow advertisers to target specific groups according to their interests.

Now we know Facebook, Twitter, Google and no doubt many others, have developed algorithms so advanced that they even manage to identify antisemites by accident. This shows how easy it is to find Facebook, Twitter and YouTube users who hate Jews. Many antisemites on these platforms make no effort at all to conceal or disguise their hatred, brazenly sharing neo-Nazi, far-left or Islamist antisemitic material. What is so shameful is not that these antisemites exist, but that Facebook, Twitter and Google evidently can identify them and chooses not to expel them from their social networking platform.

Perhaps even more outrageous is that these companies will have been collecting money from advertisers seeking to target antisemites, perhaps to invite them to Jew-hatred rallies or to share antisemitic conspiracy myths with them. Despite apologising when caught out, none of these companies have revealed how much money they made, or what will be done with the proceeds.

The reasons that these companies are so tolerant of antisemites might be related. These online titans are funded by the advertising they sell, which depends on continued growth in the number of their users, and the ability to reliably target all of those users according to their interests. Using their advanced antisemite-targeting algorithms to excise antisemites, extremists and other undesirable people from their social networking platforms could start to slightly dent the growth in the number of their users, which is a key metric of the companies’ success and their attractiveness as advertising platforms.

Now we have confirmation that internet giants are sitting on technology for targeting antisemitic users, but they are using it to sell ads instead of expelling the bigots. That is the real scandal here.

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CAA complains over Apple iMessage’s animated caricature of a hook-nosed Jew wiping his posterior with money

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been alerted to an antisemitic caricature within Apple’s iMessage app. Searching for an animation (known as an animated GIF) to accompany a message, one of our supporters, Mordy Jackson, searched for “Take my money”, only to be presented with an antisemitic caricature of a hook-nosed Jew wiping his posterior with a banknote. The caricature is an adaptation of a cartoon character from the popular children’s series, SpongeBob SquarePants.

Upon investigation, we discovered that the animated GIF is shown high up for a wide range of searches relating to money, presumably meaning that it is a popular selection. The animated GIF service in Apple’s iMessage app is actually provided by a little-known company called Tenor which also powers animated GIF searches on Google’s Android operating system. Tenor’s 250 million monthly users conduct eight billion searches for animated GIFs every month.

We have reported the animated GIF in question to both Apple and Tenor. The incident is yet another example of how technology, especially social media, has enabled the mass circulation of antisemitic propaganda. Earlier this week, Facebook was caught providing advertising services to advertisers seeking to find an audience of antisemites.

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New study finds strong link between anti-Israel and antisemitic beliefs, and increased likelihood of antisemitic beliefs amongst British Muslims

A new study by the Institute for Jewish Policy Research (JPR) has confirmed that approximately one third of British people hold at least one antisemitic prejudice. The study, authored by Dr Daniel Staetsky, corroborates Campaign Against Antisemitism’s own research, whilst also venturing into new areas, examining the relationship between antisemitism and anti-Israel beliefs, and providing further detail on antisemitism amongst the far-left, far-right and Muslims.

The report is very detailed, and it is clear that considerable effort and expense has been devoted to providing it as a freely-available resource for those interested in the study of antisemitism in Britain.

Adopting a very similar methodology to our Antisemitism Barometer polling conducted with YouGov, JPR commissioned Ipsos MORI to show a sample of British people a selection of statements about Jews: some positive, and others of a nature that Jews typically recognise as antisemitic. 30% of British people hold at least one antisemitic view according to the JPR research, whereas our YouGov polling put the figure at 36%. The small difference is only just outside the margin of error, and is likely to be accounted for by differences in the antisemitic statements and the definition of antisemitism used.

The JPR report then goes beyond our research, asking respondents whether they agree with a number of “anti-Israel” statements in order to measure the correlation between negative beliefs about Israel and negative beliefs about Jews. Under the terminology adopted in the JPR report, only the statements about Jews per se were classified as antisemitic, although some of the statements about Israel would also be classified as antisemitic under the International Definition of Antisemitism. For example, respondents who agreed with the statement that “Israel exploits Holocaust victimhood for its own purposes” or that “Israel has too much control over global affairs” are extremely likely to be expressing beliefs that engage the International Definition of Antisemitism, but the JPR study simply classifies these beliefs as anti-Israel, not antisemitic.

This part of the study does confirm what many have long suspected: that there is a very strong link between negative beliefs about the Jewish state and negative beliefs about Jewish people: 43% of people who agree with at least one anti-Israel statement also agree with at least one anti-Jewish statement. For example, those with anti-Israel views were especially likely to agree with statements that “Jews think they are better than other people” and “The interests of Jews in Britain are very different from the interests of the rest of the population”. Most disturbingly, 49% of those with strong anti-Israel attitudes were found to agree with the statement “Jews exploit Holocaust victimhood for their own purposes”.

Delving further still, JPR sought to identify the extent to which antisemitism flourished amongst particular political and religious groups, finding that antisemitism was much more likely to be found on the far-right and amongst Muslims (especially amongst religious Muslims) than amongst the British population in general. Indeed JPR found that British Muslims were approximately twice as likely as the rest of the British population to hold antisemitic beliefs.

The study’s findings with regard to antisemitism on the far-left may prove controversial. Unlike Muslims and members of the far-right, survey respondents describing their politics as far-left appeared no more likely than members of the general population to agree with negative statements about Jews. However, the study found the same link between negative statements about Israel and negative statements about Jews among people on the far-left that it did among members of every other religious and political group. In other words, it found that a person who holds multiple negative views about Israel is likely to hold negative views about Jews, regardless of whether that person sees him- or herself as belonging to the left, the right, or the centre.

Moreover, the study found people on the far left to be much more likely to agree with negative statements about Israel – so when we consider  the manner in which some antisemitic beliefs were classified in the study as being anti-Israel rather than antisemitic, it seems likely that the far-left in fact does have a disproportionate antisemitism problem when judged using the International Definition of Antisemitism instead of the JPR criteria.

JPR also sought to gauge support for violence against Jews, finding that 14% of British people consider “violence against Jews in defence of one’s political or religious beliefs and values” to often, sometimes or rarely be justified. 71% said that it was never justified and 15% said that they did not know or preferred not to say. However the study also showed that British people held similar views about the legitimacy of using violence against a range of targets, ranging from banks to European Union institutions.

In one respect in particular, the JPR study raised more questions than answers: if 30% of respondents agreed with antisemitic statements (as defined by JPR) and only 4% of respondents within that 30% self-defined as far-left, far-right or Muslim, what do the remaining 26% of British people who hold antisemitic beliefs have in common? Discovering the common denominator that unites that unaffiliated, casual grouping of antisemites remains as elusive as ever.

Finally, JPR’s results should be interpreted in the light of the methodology used. For example, when JPR asked whether respondents viewed Jews favourably, 5.4% of respondents said that they viewed Jews unfavourably, 46.8% were neutral, and 38.8% said that they viewed Jews favourably, with the remainder saying that they did not know. However, when JPR asked the question without the option of expressing neutrality, the percentage of respondents expressing unfavourable attitudes towards Jews more than doubled, suggesting that some people with unfavourable views towards Jews may have preferred to express neutrality to hide their true views, and only express their real feelings about Jews when they are not given an opportunity to express neutrality. Since JPR did allow respondents to express neutrality in all but one of its questions, it is reasonable to assume that more respondents would have expressed antisemitic views had they not been given the option of answering neutrally. In other words, it is possible that JPR’s results would have been much worse had they forced respondents to make choices.

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Couple who punched Jewish wedding guests and whipped them with dog leash walk free with £40 compensation to victims

A couple who viciously attacked Jewish wedding guests, punching them and whipping them with a dog leash whilst shouting antisemitic abuse, have walked free. Thames Magistrates’ Court handed Ineta Winiarski and Kasimiersz Winiarski a suspended 12-week prison sentence on 5th September, allowing them to walk free paying a mere £40 to each of their victims, which is approximately one third of the cost of a parking fine.

The court had heard how Ineta Winiarski, aged 33, and Kasimiersz Winiarski, aged 62, a Polish couple living in Hackney, “terrified” wedding guests outside Kehal Yetev Lev Synagogue near Clapton Common in London on 3rd July.

Magistrate Caroline Dillon was told by prosecutor Demi Ugurtay how Mr Winiarski walked over to a driver, David Tangy, who was waiting to transfer the guests from the synagogue, and slammed his door. He then shoved Mr Tangy, whilst Ms Winiarski approached with the couple’s dog and whipped a guest, Ben Herbst, with the dog’s leash and shouted “F***ing Jew”. Ben Herbst’s father, Israel Herbst rushed to protect his son from the attack and was hit by Ms Winiarski in the shoulder. Ms Winiarski shouted antisemitic abuse throughout the incident, including shouting “Kurwa” (a Polish expletive) and reportedly telling the Jewish wedding guests in broken English: “Dog stay here England, you Jews go away.”

Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol was called and followed the assailants to Clapton Common where they were arrested on suspicion of common assault and racially aggravated assault.

Ms Winiarski pleaded guilty to three counts of racially aggravated assault. She was handed a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for a year, in respect of each offence, as well as being ordered to participate in a rehabilitation programme lasting no longer than 20 days. She was also ordered to pay £40 to each of her three victims, as well as £230 in victim surcharges to fund victims’ services, and £85 in costs to the Crown Prosecution Service.

Mr Winiarski pleaded guilty to two counts of common assault. He too was handed a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for a year, in respect of each offence, as well as being ordered to participate in a rehabilitation programme lasting no longer than 20 days. He was also ordered to pay £40 to each of his two victims, as well as £115 in victim surcharges to fund victims’ services, and £85 in costs to the Crown Prosecution Service.

Magistrate Caroline Dillon told the couple: “The appropriate sentence is one of 12 weeks in prison, however, because you are of good character it will be suspended for 12 months.”

We commend Stamford Hill Shomrim for their fast response which ensured that the suspects could be arrested and prosecuted.

We are deeply dismayed by this sentence. Antisemitic crime has soared by 45% in the past two years and securing prosecutions is rare enough. For a court to hand down such a derisively lenient sentence, effectively allowing vicious antisemitic assailants to walk free, paying approximately one third the cost of a parking fine to the Jewish people that they punched and whipped in broad daylight, is an affront. This paltry sentence will not deter antisemites, it will embolden them. Our criminal justice system is continuing to send a strong message that antisemites will rarely be charged, rarely be prosecuted, and rarely be properly punished. It is surely because of verdicts like this one that our research shows that a mere 21% of British Jews think that the authorities are doing enough to address and punish antisemitism. We hope that the Crown Prosecution Service will now appeal this outrageous verdict.

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José Manuel Silva sentenced to 28 days in prison and ordered to pay £250 for shouting “burn” at Jews in Golders Green

José Manuel Silva has been sentenced to 28 days in prison after being convicted of racially and religiously aggravated intentional harassment, alarm, distress and criminal damage for shouting antisemitic abuse in Golders Green in London. Mr Silva, who pleaded guilty, has also been ordered to pay costs of £85 to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and has been fined £165.

Mr Silva’s abuse reportedly included shouting “burn” and pointing at Jewish passersby, including children, on 24th August on the corner of Hoop Lane and Finchley Road in Golders Green. He was detained by CST until the Metropolitan Police Service arrived to arrest him.

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends CST for its swift response and thanks the police and the CPS for ensuring that Mr Silva has suffered the consequences of his antisemitic abuse.

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Labour Party Conference will reportedly include a session on the supposed antisemitism “witch hunt”

The Labour Party Conference later this month is reportedly due to include a session labelling the Labour Party’s chronic antisemitism scandal as a “witch hunt”.

According to political blog, Guido Fawkes, the session will be entitled “Free speech on Israel – why we oppose the witch hunt” and will be chaired by the notorious Vice Chair of the Chingford branch of the Chingford and Woodford Green Constituency Labour Party, Naomi Wimborne-Idrissi.

Ms Wimborne-Idrissi denies that the Labour Party has an antisemitism problem and has even previously taken to the airwaves to say that Israel has “inflicted” the Holocaust on other people and “they use and exploit” the Holocaust for political ends. In October last year she told LBC: “When it comes to the Holocaust, of course, there must never be any minimisation of that horror. It’s inflicted on other people in the sense that apologists for Israel use the suffering of Jews to excuse the suffering of Palestinians. I hear it all the time: ‘Oh, they’ve suffered so much, let them get on with it.’ I’m not saying that Israel is committing a Holocaust. I’m saying they use and exploit the fact of the Holocaust to justify what are, in some cases, crimes against humanity…So the mass slaughter of Jews in Europe should never be inflicted on others. That’s my view and that includes Palestinians. But for that, I’m called a self-hating Jew.”

The comments came after Ms Wimborne-Idrissi told the radio station that a Jewish MP had staged an antisemitic incident in order to undermine Jeremy Corbyn. Listening in the studio, Labour MP Alison McGovern became visibly emotional, holding back tears, as Ms Wimborne-Idrissi alleged that Ruth Smeeth, a Jewish Labour MP, had used an antisemitic incident to “completely undermine the launch of a really important report about racism”, referring to Baroness Chakrabarti’s whitewash report into antisemitism in the Labour Party. Ms Wimborne-Idrissi said that Ms Smeeth was clearly motivated to concoct the incident because she “is against Corbyn, against his whole Socialist vision”. Continuing, Ms Wimborne-Idrissi claimed that the Jewish MP’s supposed ruse had worked: “Did anybody know about racism after the release of that report? No they didn’t. All they knew was that an angry Jewish MP had run out of the room. That’s all they knew…The Chakrabarti Commission has been undermined at every turn by people like Ruth Smeeth and Louise Ellman [another Jewish Labour MP] and others like them who have a political agenda. The question of antisemitism is being used as a weapon in a political battle.”

Last year’s Labour Party Conference was awash with antisemitic incidents, and sadly we see nothing to suggest that this year will be any different.

If you are attending the Labour Party Conference and would like to help us monitor it, please e-mail political-investigations@antisemitism.uk.

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Cambridge neo-Nazi Lawrence Burns’ sentence slashed after judges sympathise with arguments he was just “immature”

A convicted neo-Nazi has had his four-year sentence slashed by the Court of Appeal, after judges branded his original sentence “manifestly excessive”.

Lawrence Burns was sentenced to four years in prison in March by a judge at Peterborough Crown Court after being convicted of two counts of incitement to racial hatred over his antisemitic Facebook posts and a speech on YouTube last year. In December 2016, Mr Burns was also found guilty of two charges of publishing threatening, abusive or insulting written material with intent or likely intent to stir up racial hatred by a jury at Cambridge Crown Court.

In one video, Mr Burns accused Jews of being “parasites” that wanted to create a “mongrelised race”. In one of his many social media posts, Burns compared Jews to “maggots in a decaying body” who are “hijacking the genes of a superior white race”. The court heard that Mr Burns had posted 140 comments comments in which he stirred up racial hatred on an alias Facebook account he had set up.

According to one report, a search of Mr Burns’ home revealed a number of antisemitic books, a scarf with a “neo-Nazi” logo and a phone containing a further 125 photos depicting racist views, along with three audio recordings made by Mr Burns, where he is alleged to have said a “real Holocaust” is the only solution to “ridding the Jews”.

Mr Justice Phillips, sitting with Lord Justice Davis and Mr Justice Garnham, said Mr Burns’ utterances had strayed “far beyond what is regarded as acceptable in this society” and were intended to “promote racial hatred”, but that Mr Burns’ four-year sentence was “manifestly excessive”.

The judges slashed Mr Burns’ sentence to two-and-a-half years on account of the fact that he was only 20 and 21 when he committed the offences, and because he was of “low intellect”, stating that they made the decision due to his “young age” and “poor educational background”.

Mr Burns’ lawyer, Adrian Davies, also told the court that Mr Burns’ 98 Facebook friends had much more extreme views than Mr Burns, and that should be taken into account, because their views were so extreme that they made Mr Burns “seem moderate”.

Mr Burns was disappointed in his ambition to completely overturn his conviction.

Campaign Against Antisemitism deplores the message sent by the court, that a dedicated adult neo-Nazi who embraced a genocidal ideology should be granted clemency. Mr Burns was not a child. He wilfully and prolifically engaged in the most vile incitement to commit acts of violence against Jews and black people.

You may wish to write to your MP using the simple form at writetothem.com, asking them to draw your concerns to the attention of the Attorney General, The Rt Hon. Jeremy Wright QC MP, the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, The Rt Hon. David Lidington MP, and the President of the Sentencing Council, The Rt Hon. Lord Thomas, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales.

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Chelsea Football Club must act or face action over supporters’ latest antisemitic song

Chelsea Football Club faces action from the Football Association following its supporters’ latest antisemitic song. The club’s fans have a long history of singing and chanting the most disgusting antisemitic lyrics, but only rarely have fans been prosecuted.

The latest antisemitic song to ring out from the Chelsea supporters’ section came on Saturday, when the club’s new player, Álvaro Morata, scored a goal. In celebration, numerous Chelsea supporters were reported to have sang: “Álvaro, oh, Álvaro, oh. He came from Real Madrid, he hates the f***ing Yids.”

“Yid” is a Yiddish word sometimes appropriated by antisemites as a repulsive derogatory term for Jews on a par with slave-trade era terms to describe black people. It is often and brazenly used by Chelsea supporters as a means of deriding rival team Tottenham Hotspur, amongst whose supporters Chelseas fans believe that there are many Jews.

Both Chelsea Football Club and Álvaro Morata swiftly spoke out. Chelsea issued a statement saying that “The club and the players appreciate the fans’ passionate support away from home, but the language in that song is not acceptable at all. We have spoken to Álvaro after the game, he does not want to be connected with that song in any way. Both the club and the player request the supporters stop singing that song with immediate effect.” Mr Morata tweeted: “Since I arrived, I have been able to feel your support every single day, you are amazing and I’d like to ask you to please respect everyone!”

Due to the repeated brazen singing of antisemitic songs by Chelsea fans, statements are no longer enough. Whilst we welcome the club’s swift condemnation of this repulsive singing, Chelsea must now either identify and the punish fans who participated, or the club itself should face strict penalties from the Football Association to send a clear message to its fans.

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Richard Reed fined £300 for shouting “I’m going to kill you f***ing Jews” and making gun gestures at Jewish man

Richard Gary Reed from Ipswich has reportedly been convicted of religiously-aggravated harassment and fined £300 after pleading guilty to shouting “I’m going to kill you f***ing Jews, I know where you are” and making gun gestures at a recognisably Jewish man who had entered a pub in Suffolk with friends on 5th August.

The landlady called the police, who arrested Reed at the scene. He pleaded guilty at Ipswich Magistrates’ Court late last month and has now been ordered to pay a £300 fine, as well as court costs 0f £85, a victim surcharge of £30 and compensation of £100.

The victim, who asked to remain anonymous told the Jewish News: “I was shocked that this antisemitic abuse happened whilst I was out in the country, I didn’t expect this type of threatening behaviour.” CST provided victim support.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the firm response by the police, the prosecution and the court.

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Four members of British Army arrested on suspicion of being National Action terrorists

Four members of the British Army have been arrested by specialist counter-terrorism police on suspicion of being members of National Action, a violent far-right terrorist organisation.

The men, aged 22, 24, 24 and 32, from Birmingham, Northampton, Ipswich, Birmingham and Powys, are all now in police custody. The Ministry of Defence has confirmed the arrests and that civilian police are leading the investigation.

The arrests were carried out by West Midlands Counter Terrorism Unit in conjunction with the Wales Extremism Counter Terrorism Unit and the East Midlands Counter Terrorism Intelligence Unit.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

National Action is a deeply antisemitic, violent organisation whose fascist ideology and terrorist operations threaten British society.

In February, a 17-year-old member of National Action walked free despite being convicted of preparing a bomb with which to spark an “all-out race war”.

We thank the police for their constant vigilance.

We are following the case with interest.

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14-year-old subjected to antisemitic abuse and threatened by unknown man in Stamford Hill

While returning to his home at approximately 03:30 on 2nd September, a 14-year-old boy became aware of shouts of “Jew, Jew” being directed at him by a man on a bicycle. He bravely confronted the man who repeatedly asked him: “What do you have?” The man then asked “Do you have a knife?” at which point the boy ran home. The incident was witnessed from the house by his mother, who told us that it left her feeling scared and worried that the streets are not as safe as she had believed.

The victim described the man as having a beard and a big double chin, and wearing a heavy jacket and trousers. The incident occured in Holmleigh Road and has now been reported to the police by the victim’s mother.

If you have any information that could help the investigation, please contact the police by dialing 101.

Stamford Hill Shomrim provided support to the victim and then referred the incident to Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Image credit: Lewis Clarke

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CAA calls on Home Secretary to ban alleged antisemite Sheikh Ekrima Sabri from entering the UK to address MPs

Sheikh Ekrima Sabri, a former Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and current Imam of the city’s Al-Aqsa Mosque, who allegedly denied that six million Jews were murdered in the Holocaust, is reportedly scheduled to visit Britain from 11th-15th September as part of a delegation organised by the pro-Palestinian group EuroPal. It is reported that he will also meet with MPs in Parliament.

Sabri has a history of making antisemitic statements. According to the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) Sabri denied the number of Jews murdered in the Holocaust, telling Italian newspaper, La Repubblica, in 2000: “Six million Jews dead? No way, they were much fewer. Let’s stop with this fairytale exploited by Israel to capture international solidarity.” Under the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the UK Government, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is antisemitic.

Furthermore, Sabri reportedly said in a New York Times Magazine interview in 2000 that “If the Jews want peace, they will stay away from Al Aksa…This is a decree from Allah. The Haram al-Sharif belongs to the Muslim. But we know the Jew is planning on destroying the Haram. The Jew will get the Christian to do his work for him. This is the way of the Jews. This is the way Satan manifests himself. The majority of the Jews want to destroy the mosque. They are preparing this as we speak.” Under the the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic.

Also according to MEMRI, Sabri said in an interview with the Egyptian weekly, Al-Ahram Al-Arabi, in 2000 that “I enter the mosque of Al-Aqsa with my head up and at the same time I am filled with rage toward the Jews. I have never greeted a Jew when I came near one. I never will. They cannot even dream that I will. The Jews do not dare to bother me, because they are the most cowardly creatures Allah has ever created…”

In 2012, Sabri was reportedly banned by the French Government from entering France.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has asked the Home Office to follow suit and ban Sabri from entering the UK and speaking to MPs in Parliament.

We encourage you to add your voice by contacting your local MP using the simple form at writetothem.com.

We would like to thank the individuals and organisations which brought this matter to our attention.

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CAA Chairman writes in Jewish Chronicle, Jewish News and Jewish Telegraph explaining our Antisemitism Barometer research

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Chairman, Gideon Falter, has this week written articles in the Jewish ChronicleJewish News and Jewish Telegraph, explaining the results of our Antisemitism Barometer research, which were misrepresented by some who claimed that we were expecting almost a third of the UK’s 269,000 Jews to leave the country imminently. If you would like to voice your support for CAA’s work, please feel free to e-mail letters@thejc.comletters@thejngroup.com or letters@jewishtelegraph.com, making sure that you include your postal address (indicating that you would prefer that it is not published).

We must resist the seduction of both complacency and fear

The following article was published in the Jewish News.

I have never understood why some people get used to antisemitism. There are people in our community who see nothing disturbing about dropping their children off at fortified schools, or passing through airport-style security to enter their synagogue. As antisemitic crime surges, they look perplexed and observe that nothing feels different to them because nothing has happened to them personally. They accept the risk of antisemitism as part of their everyday life, but fail to act as long as they themselves are not targeted.

Our charity seeks to educate against antisemitism whilst simultaneously working to inflict criminal, professional and reputational sanctions upon antisemites. To succeed, we must pinpoint the problem, and that is why the accuracy of our research is crucial: if it contains mistakes, we could find ourselves fighting the wrong battles.

Last week, Campaign Against Antisemitism (CAA) published our Antisemitism Barometer research. Conducted over three years, it included three specially-commissioned YouGov polls of the British population’s attitudes towards Jews, and two separate CAA polls of British Jews, the data from which was weighted by a former Associate Director at YouGov. Our rigorous research showed that antisemitic prejudice was actually declining, but that British Jews were becoming increasingly fearful with almost one in three having asked themselves whether to leave the UK. They do not need to be packing their bags for the question to be significant. When our polling asked British Jews to point a finger of blame, more than half accused the Crown Prosecution Service for failing to prosecute all but a handful of antisemitic crimes annually, and the Labour Party was attacked by 4 in 5 of us for its newfound mastery of the art of whitewashing antisemitism.

Just when we should be celebrating a fall in prejudice against Jews, we find ourselves grappling with rising fear of surging antisemitic crime and the acceptance by swathes of the electorate of a political party riddled with antisemites. Our findings sparked national debate, but the communal debate was no less interesting because of the divisions that it exposed.

Some complained that they had never been a victim of antisemitism, and so it could not possibly be true, accusing us of exaggeration. Others accused us of somehow suppressing the voices of those who are making plans to leave.

Perhaps in this world of social media bubbles and fake news, we are all losing the ability to listen to the views of others. British Jews’ experiences will vary according to their denomination and whether they wear visible signs of their Judaism. They vary by neighbourhood, age, and gender. Those with children may feel differently about the future to those without. As a community, we must accept these variations and try to understand the whole picture, not just our personal part of it.

The facts are in our research and we neither played them up nor down. They tell us that Britain is one of the best places in the world in which to be Jewish, but we can also see that our comfort in this country is increasingly at risk. There is no contradiction in recognising how lucky we are, whilst fighting the threats that assail us. Our research tells us that however satisfied we may be with our laws and the majority of our politicians, it is imperative that we focus our attention on the failures to prosecute, and antisemitism in the Labour Party. Future generations will not forgive us if we enjoyed the golden era for British Jews but watched complacently as it ended.

Our dedication to ensuring CAA hate stats add up

The following article was published in the Jewish Chronicle.

In last week’s JC, sociology researcher Keith Kahn-Harris welcomed Campaign Against Antisemitism’s latest research into antisemitism in the UK, and British Jews’ responses to it, but he raised questions about our charity’s approach to the answers which I am happy to answer.

Our Antisemitism Barometer research is the product of three years’ work. We undertook five polls and analysed 10,567 responses. We commissioned leading pollsters YouGov to survey attitudes towards Jews amongst British people in 2015, 2016 and 2017. Separately, we worked with partners in the Jewish community to poll British Jews’ responses to antisemitism in 2016 and 2017, hiring a former Associate Director at YouGov to ensure that our results accurately represented the national Jewish community. As Dr Kahn-Harris recognised, “The report’s findings need to be considered seriously.”

Our charity seeks to educate against antisemitism whilst simultaneously working to inflict criminal, professional and reputational sanctions upon antisemites. To succeed, we must pinpoint the problem, and that is why the accuracy of our research is crucial: if it contains mistakes, we could find ourselves fighting the wrong battles.

We found that British people are becoming less antisemitic. Today, 36% hold at least one antisemitic prejudice, compared with 45% in 2015. Only 54% say that they have ever met a Jew. We pinpointed the worst regions, age groups, political persuasions and more. Amongst Jews, we found that in the past two years, nearly one in three has considered moving abroad due to antisemitism. That does not mean they are busy packing their suitcases, but Jews are asking themselves alarming questions about their future here, and that is significant. 39% of us are concealing our religion in public. 64% of us think the authorities do too little to punish antisemitism, and 52% think that the Crown Prosecution Service does too little. 76% say political developments have caused more antisemitism and 83% say Labour is harbouring antisemites. We use this information to target our work, including drawing up recommendations that we are discussing with the Government.

Dr Kahn-Harris asks questions about our research, focusing on the speed of our analysis and what he called our lack of “collegiality”. He might just as well have asked us by e-mail as in a newspaper column.

It is hard to characterise a three-year study as hasty. Rather than being disconcerted by the speed of our analysis, he should understand that Campaign Against Antisemitism operates like a startup. Instead of salaried 9-5 functionaries, we are powered by dedicated unpaid volunteers working all hours when needed. By the time we had concluded our 2017 polling, we had already built the data models to analyse it and discussed previous years’ findings. All that remained was to analyse the latest results, and how they compared to what we had found previously.

I suspect that Dr Kahn-Harris most objects to what he perceives as our lack of “collegiality”. He explains that we are rarely to be seen at conferences or at communal symposia, and he blames us. The fact is that Campaign Against Antisemitism is excluded from the Jewish community’s cosy club of established bodies, but we will always be willing to collaborate constructively against antisemitism. Next time there is a conference, if he invites us, we will be delighted to come.

CAA polling was accurate and rigorous, but disturbing

The following article was published in the Jewish Telegraph.

Last week’s Jewish Telegraph led with a headline attacking a poll conducted by Campaign Against Antisemitism, claiming that it had been “panned” by “Jewish academics”. Readers would have had to turn to page 23 to find that out that was not the case.

In fact, none of the academics cited, or this paper itself, criticised the polling, and in any case, as specialists in history, politics and management, the academics asked to comment were hardly experts in statistics. They did not criticise the polling but did express dismay, even disbelief, that so many British Jews are now having second thoughts about their future in this country.

The journalism was uncharacteristically unfair. Most editors would not admit that, so I am grateful for this opportunity to set the record straight.

In five polls over three years, we asked what British people think about Jews, and what British Jews think about antisemitism. We asked expert pollsters, YouGov, to poll the British population’s attitudes towards Jews in 2015, 2016 and 2017. In separate polling, we worked with Jewish community bodies to poll a nationally representative sample of British Jews about antisemitism in 2016 and 2017, hiring a former Associate Director at YouGov to review our work. We analysed 10,567 responses over three years.

What we found was both harrowing and uplifting.

First, the good news: British people have begun to shun antisemitism. In 2015, YouGov found that 45% of British adults held at least one antisemitic stereotype, but that fell to 39% in 2016, and 36% in 2017. We can be grateful that antisemitism is falling in Britain even as it soars on the Continent. Of the one third of British people who hold some prejudice against Jews, there are degrees of severity, which our research helps us to pinpoint. We now know, for example, which regions we need to target, which age groups, and which supporters of political parties.

Now the bad news: British Jews are increasingly fearful, with almost 1 in 3 saying that they have considered leaving Britain in the past two years. Last week’s coverage absurdly suggested that we now expect a third of the UK’s 269,000 Jews to pack their bags. However, it is significant that British Jews are increasingly considering this option. Delving into the responses further, we find that 76% of British Jews say that political events caused antisemitism to rise, and 83% of us feel that the Labour Party is harbouring antisemites. 37% of us have been concealing our Judaism in public and merely 39% felt confident that an antisemitic crime against them would be prosecuted. 52% say the Crown Prosecution Service does too little. Our community is hugely concerned about Islamism, the far-left, and antisemitism disguised as discourse about Israel. Perhaps none of this is surprising, but it is important to know, and important to be able to demonstrate it to the Government.

Our research provides a roadmap that Campaign Against Antisemitism will use to fight antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism is a charity that trains unpaid volunteers (including me) to work in highly-effective teams with backup from eminent lawyers to ensure that antisemites pay a crippling criminal, professional and reputational cost for their hatred. Simultaneously, we interrupt the flow of antisemitic ideology through highly-targeted outreach and education work. Anybody can join us in our fight against antisemitism by visiting www.antisemitism.uk/act.

Our rigorous research has shown that we are starting to turn the tide, but we still have a great deal to do.

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President of Stamford Hill Shomrim tells authorities to be “much more proactive” and bring antisemites to justice

Rabbi Hershel Gluck, the President of Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol, has called on the authorities and the police to be more proactive against antisemitic crime, as the rate of incidents rises in the Stamford Hill area. Rabbi Gluck said: “It is a shocking phenomenon that this seems to be allowed to continue. There certainly seems to be a lack of positive action in dealing constructively with antisemitic hate crimes. I expect the authorities and the police to be much more proactive in bringing the perpetrators of these hate crimes to justice.”

The news comes as research by Campaign Against Antisemitism found that almost one in three British Jews have considered leaving the UK due to antisemitism. The study found that only 59% of British Jews feel welcome in the UK, and 17% feel unwelcome, and for the past two years, 37% of British Jews have been concealing their Judaism in public.

In the wake of a 45% surge in antisemitic crime since 2014, British Jews delivered a damning verdict on law enforcement in Britain. 64% felt that the authorities were not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism, and a mere 39% felt confident that antisemitic hate crimes against them would be prosecuted. For the first time, more than half of British Jews said that the CPS is doing too little to fight antisemitism, and almost half criticised the courts.

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends Rabbi Gluck for his firm call for the authorities to act against antisemitism. It is imperative that Jewish leaders continue to speak out against rising antisemitic crime and demand action. It is crucial that our world-renowned criminal justice system prosecutes antisemitic hatred before it is too late.

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Chris Williamson MP must apologise and withdraw his claim that antisemitism allegations against Labour are “bulls***” and “dirty tricks”

For some time, it has been undeniable that the Labour Party has lost its status as an anti-racist organisation. Following the Party’s failure to expel Ken Livingstone a full year after his statements claiming that Hitler supported Zionism, 107 of its MPs felt moved to sign a statement declaring: “We stand with the Jewish community and British society against this insidious racism. This was not done in our name and we will not allow it to go unchecked.” Nearly five months on, nothing has changed.

The handling of Ken Livingstone’s case is merely one item in a sad litany of incidents involving not just rank and file so-called ‘hard-left’ members of the party, but candidates and elected officers of the party, virtually all of which have been shown to be antisemitic under the terms of the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the UK Government and accepted by the Labour Party. However, even when these incidents have (rarely) resulted in a disciplinary process, the cases and their outcomes have been obscured under the terms of the Chakrabarti report, a whitewash of antisemitism in Labour that supresses transparency.

What is more, these incidents have taken place against a backdrop of leading figures of the party, including Diane AbbottLen McLuskey as well as Ken Livingstone, declaring that allegations of antisemitism in Labour constitute nothing more than a disingenuous political attack on the leadership of the Labour Party, despite Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Chief Rabbi and almost all of the other major organisations of the British Jewish community making clear their concerns that many of these incidents were indeed antisemitic.

This is a record that should leave any political party hanging its head in shame. Therefore for Chris Williamson, the MP for Derby North and Shadow Minister for Fire and Emergency Services, to assert in an interview with The Guardian that — with very few exceptions — controversies over Jeremy Corbyn’s handling of antisemitism within Labour were “proxy wars and bulls***” and the result of a “really dirty, low-down trick” seem astonishing.

Whereas the comments of Abbott and McLuskey imply that Jewish complaints of antisemitism are essentially disingenuous and politically motivated, Williamson has now couched that assertion in racist language, redolent of antisemitism. If we take them at face value, Jews’ complaints in this context are “dirty”, “low-down”, “bulls***” and “tricks”.

In addition, Mr Williamson invokes a ‘good Jew, bad Jew’ trope, claiming that “Many people in the Jewish community are appalled by what they see as the weaponisation of antisemitism for political ends” — in the teeth of contrary evidence that the Jewish community’s support for Labour has ebbed badly under its current leadership, and that our recent polling indicates alarm among UK Jews in relation to Labour antisemitism.

When criticised by Jewish groups, including the Jewish Labour Movement itself, Mr Williamson responded by saying: “I absolutely did not and never would blame the victims of antisemitism or any form or racism and bigotry. Antisemitism is utterly repugnant and a scourge on society, which is why I stand in absolute solidarity with anyone who is subjected to antisemitic abuse. The point I was trying to make is that accusations have on occasions been used for factional or party political ends.”

In doing so, Mr Williamson has disingenuously attempted to re-frame what he described as part of an “expected…onslaught” as a phenomenon that occurs only “on occasions”. He has failed to fundamentally address the evidence, the problems associated with Jeremy Corbyn’s past, and his own past problematic behaviour with regard to this issue, nor has he apologised for his own repugnant use of language. He has failed to explain how his comments are supposed to be interpreted with regard to those who point out that antisemitic incidents in the Labour Party are both widespread and abundantly evidenced under the terms of the International Definition of Antisemitism that his own party has accepted.

It is very hard to see how Mr Williamson stands “in absolute solidarity” with Jews subjected to antisemitic abuse, when he himself, as things stand, is characterising those in our community who complain of it as “dirty, low-down trick[sters]”.

Should he continue to stand by his comments, then they could be construed as antisemitic under the International Definition of Antisemitism.

We call on Mr Williamson to acknowledge the evidence that antisemitic incidents in the Labour Party are real, widespread and have not been dealt with adequately under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership; to apologise for his use of language and to publicly withdraw his comments.

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Locals in uproar as 35,000 people sign petition against display of Nazi flag at Leek market stall

Local residents in Leek, Staffordshire, have united in condemnation of a market stall in the town which has been displaying the Nazi flag. More than 35,000 people have already signed a petition calling for the flag to be removed from sale if it is a recently-manufactured replica, or removed from display if it is a genuine ‘antique’. According to the petition, the town’s mayor has known about the flag for a “long time” but has taken no action.

Whilst there are of course legitimate reasons to sell and purchase Nazi artefacts, for example for academic purposes, there are many cases in which the collection of Nazi ‘memorabilia’ is related to neo-Nazi beliefs. For example the murderer who killed Jo Cox MP had a collection of Nazi artefacts and a neo-Nazi teenager convicted of building a bomb to spark a “race war” was found to have a Nazi flag hanging in his bedroom.

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“F*** Yids” found freshly scrawled on side door to London Jewish school

Stamford Hill Shomrim has reported graffiti found freshly scrawled on the side door to a Jewish school to the Metropolitan Police Service. It is likely that whoever is responsible intended to target the graffiti at the school.

Anybody with information should contact the police by calling 101 and quoting reference number CAD6281/30/08/2017.

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Man allegedly hurls bottle at Jewish girls, shouting “Hitler is a good man, good he killed the Jews”

A man allegedly attacked and chased a group of teenage Jewish girls at approximately 18:50 today. The girls, who did not know the man, noticed him when he allegedly started shouting “Israel” at them, before hurling a bottle at them. As the bottle shattered and the girls ran for cover, he allegedly yelled after them: “Hitler is a good man, good he killed the Jews”. The suspect was not known to his alleged victims.

One of the victims’ mothers has reported the incident to the Metropolitan Police Service, and volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim are assisting the victims.

Anybody who witnessed the alleged incident should call the Metropolitan Police Service on 101, quoting reference CAD7138/27/08/2017.

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Baroness Tonge shares “Jewish lobby” rant complete with antisemitic caricature of hook-nosed Jew

Disgraced Baroness Tonge, who was twice suspended from the Liberal Democrats over allegations of antisemitism and eventually resigned as pressure mounted, has shared an antisemitic caricature on Facebook.

The caricature was part of an image which claimed to expose the “AIPAC Jewish lobby” through a quote supposedly from Pink Floyd singer Roger Waters. In the bottom-right corner of the image, an antisemitic caricature of a big-nosed Jew clasping his hands together can be seen. The caricature is commonly used by neo-Nazis and far-left extremists in antisemitic social media memes.

The original post, which Baroness Tonge shared, was posted by Saeed Sarwar, who commented on the image: “I’ve checked with 4 specialist friends in case anyone tries to suggest this is antisemitism. It’s actually bang on.”

Baroness Tonge has a long history of using inflammatory, and sometimes antisemitic, language. In 2003 she compared conditions in Gaza to those in the Warsaw Ghetto, for which she was criticised by the chairman of the Yad Vashem Holocaust museum. The following year, during a spate of suicide bombings targeting Jews in Israel, she said that she “might just consider becoming [a suicide bomber] myself” if she was a Palestinian. After her comments were condemned as “completely unacceptable” by her own Party leader, Charles Kennedy, she told the BBC that suicide bombers’ actions are “appalling and loathsome”. Two years later in 2006, she told a fringe meeting at her Party conference: “The pro-Israeli lobby has got its grips on the western world, its financial grips. I think they’ve probably got a grip on our Party.” Once again, her Party leader, then Sir Menzies Campbell, said that her comments had “clear antisemitic connotations”, but she was unapologetic.

In 2010, in response to an antisemitic blood libel alleging that Israeli soldiers providing aid in Haiti were secretly harvesting victims’ organs, Baroness Tonge suggested that Israel should conduct an inquiry to “clear the names of the team in Haiti”. The Party leader, who by then was Nick Clegg, called the comments “wrong, distasteful and provocative”, and removed her as the Party’s health spokesperson. In 2012, the situation worsened when Baroness Tonge told a group at Middlesex University: “Beware Israel. Israel is not going to be there forever in its present performance.” Party leader Nick Clegg challenged her to apologise or resign for her remarks, following which she resigned the Party whip.

In 2015, Campaign Against Antisemitism condemned Baroness Tonge for asking a written question in the House of Lords which held Jews collectively responsible for perceived wrongdoing by Israel by calling for “Jewish faith leaders in the United Kingdom [to] publicly to condemn settlement building by Israel and to make clear their support for universal human rights.” Last year, she used a speech in the House of Lords to again call on “Jewish faith leaders in the United Kingdom publicly to condemn settlement building by Israel”, for which we condemned her, however her Party refused to act. When we called on our supporters to complain to the Liberal Democrat Party, the Party bizarrely responded that they would investigate if they received complaints. We then confirmed that our complaint was already a complaint and heard nothing more. Meanwhile Baroness Tonge wrote a misleading letter to The Independent claiming that Campaign Against Antisemitism was in fact an organisation which secretly opposed organ donation.

She then hosted a meeting in the House of Lords at which attendees compared Israel to ISIS and suggested that Holocaust victims provoked their own genocide. She was suspended from the Liberal Democrat party pending investigation, following which she resigned from the Party, but she remains in the House of Lords. Subsequently, the House of Lords Commissioner for Standards, Lucy Scott-Moncrieff, declined to take action against Baroness Tonge.

In October last year, Baroness Tonge responded to a report on rising antisemitism by the House of Commons Home Affairs Committee with a letter in which she wrote: “It is difficult to believe that a 75% increase in antisemitism [the Committee] reports, have been committed by people who simply hate Jewish people for no reason. It is surely the case that these incidents are reflecting the disgust amongst the general public of the way the government of Israel treats Palestinians and manipulates the USA and ourselves to take no action against that country’s blatant disregard of International Law and the Geneva Conventions.” The failure to act led a Liberal Democrat former candidate to quit the Party. One member of the public reported the letter to Sussex Police.

In February, after Baroness Tonge called for Campaign Against Antisemitism to be deregistered as a charity, Parliamentarians rallied to support us in the media.

In May, Baroness Tonge shared and then deleted an image belittling the Holocaust by equating it with the situation in Gaza. The cartoonist, Carlos Latuff, had won second prize in one of Iran’s repulsive Holocaust denial cartoon competitions.

We consider that Baroness Tonge’s ongoing membership of the House of Lords and the medical profession are stains on both institutions.

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Swastika and star of David graffiti removed from recreation ground in Sible Hedingham

Swastikas (drawn the wrong way around) and a star of David daubed on a wall at Sible Hedingham Recreation Ground in Essex have been removed by the Parish Council.

A parish council spokesman said: “Sible Hedingham Parish Council were horrified and upset with the graffiti that was painted on the brick shelter in the Recreation Ground. The Recreation Ground is a community facility that is well used by families who enjoy the play equipment and the open space. The graffiti was gone within 24 hours of the Parish Council finding out about it. The graffiti had to be painted over as no amount of scrubbing, graffiti remover or paint thinner worked. The Parish Council denounce the behaviour of those involved in the disgusting graffiti.”

The Halstead Gazette reported that CCTV is now being examined in the hope that the perpetrator can be identified.

We commend the Parish Council for its exemplary response.

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Venues confirm to CAA that they have cancelled bookings for David Icke’s shows

Central Hall in Southampton and St Andrew’s Hall in Norwich have confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that they have cancelled the bookings for shows by modern-day antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, on 27th and 30th April 2018.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted them and other venues in the UK where Mr Icke is scheduled to perform in November this year and April next year.

Some venues have not yet cancelled their planned events with Mr Icke, including The Caves in Edinburgh on 13th November 2017, The Troxy in London on 15th November 2017, Athena in Leicester on 20th April 2018 and Komedia in Bath on 24th April 2018. Their contact details are below, should members of the public wish to politely add their voices to calls for the shows to be cancelled.

We alerted the venues that Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred towards Jewish people by repeating centuries-old libels, as well as conspiracy myths that were used by Nazi Germany to justify the Holocaust.

We explained that Mr Icke’s repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic in the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, including: “making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” and “accusing Jews as a people of being responsible for real or imagined wrongdoing committed by a single Jewish person or group, or even for acts committed by non-Jews.”

Mr Icke is also listed to appear at “Top Secret” locations in Manchester on 17th November 2017, Southport/Liverpool on 14th April 2018 and Sheffield on 17th April 2018.

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks the management at Central Hall and St Andrew’s Hall for taking a principled stand and cancelling the bookings. We trust that the other venues will follow their example and lead.

We also commend and thank North West Friends of Israel for successfully intervening to get events with Mr Icke cancelled at the Lowry Hotel in Salford, Sheffield City Hall and the Gladstone Theatre in Wirral.

The venues that have not yet decided to cancel Mr Icke’s shows are:

13th November 2017
The Caves, 8-10 Niddry Street South, Edinburgh EH1 1NS
Telephone: 0131 510 1122
E-mail: hello@unusualvenuesedinburgh.com

15th November 2017
The Troxy, 490 Commercial Road, London E1 0HX
Telephone: 020 7790 9000
E-mail: hello@troxy.co.uk

20th April 2018
Athena, Queen Street, Leicester LE1 1QD
Telephone: 0116 262 6556
E-mail: contact@athenacb.co.uk

24th April 2018
Komedia, 22-23 Westgate Street, Bath BA1 1EP
Telephone: 0122 548 9070
E-mail: infobath@komedia.co.uk

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Shomrim patrol finds potential National Action graffiti in Stamford Hill alongside the message “Too many yids f*** off”

Graffiti bearing what may be the logo of National Action, a proscribed terrorist organisation, has been found scrawled on a bus stop in Amhurst Park in Stamford Hill, alongside various messages including the words: “Too many yids f*** off”. National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism. There has also been speculation that instead of a National Action logo, the logo might be the symbol for the anarchist movement, however the accompanying messages appear to be racist in nature and do not reflect typical anarchist messaging.

The graffiti includes a ghoulish figure, which bears a moustache that could be likened to that of Adolf Hitler, along with a clenched fist and another specimen of what appears to be the National Action logo, or possibly the anarchist movement’s logo. The graffiti was found by volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol. It has been reported to the Metropolitan Police Service.

A spokesperson for the Metropolitan Police Service told the Jewish News that “The local policing team are working to capture the images and remove the grafitti in partnership with the local authority.”

If the graffiti is indeed the work of National Action’s followers, it is very possible that it was drawn by individuals whose intention is to cause the most severe harm to the Jewish community and other sections of British society. We trust that the police officers who investigate will treat this as a dangerous warning sign that merits resources being devoted to finding the perpetrator and clarifying their motive. Vigilance is vital, and we commend Stamford Hill Shomrim for bringing this graffiti to the attention of the police.

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Metro readers rush to prove British Jews right about antisemitism, calling allegations of antisemitism a “witch-hunt”

Readers of Metro appear to have rushed to respond to the paper’s prominent page two coverage of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s new research by proving British Jews right about antisemitism.

Our Antisemitism Barometer research found that 83% of British Jews believe that the Labour Party is harbouring antisemites, whilst 78% have witnessed antisemitism disguised as a political comment about Israel or Zionism, 81% believe that media bias against Israel was fuelling persecution of Jews in Britain, and 78% feel intimidated by tactics used to boycott Israel.

Two Metro readers rushed to respond by writing in to ably demonstrate exactly how British Jews are shouted down or ignored when they complain about antisemitism, in a double antisemitism whereby Jews not only suffer racism, but are then accused of lying when they complain about it.

One reader, Tom, complained bitterly: “Antisemitism is evil, but political discussion is not. Fighting antisemitism depends on knowing the difference. Fear of Senator McCarthy was part of my Detroit childhood and I know a witch-hunt when I see it. Labour must stop the witch-hunt.”

Another reader, who remained anonymous, also had strong feelings to share, writing: “There is a massive difference between antisemitism and being against Zionists who are anti-Palestinian.”

We are disappointed that Metro felt that these comments were worth publishing. Anybody can reply by sending a text message to 65400, beginning their message with the word: “VIEWS”. The best text messages may be published by Metro, which says that texting the number is charged at the standard network rate for a text message.

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New CPS guidelines for prosecution of hate crime will only help if there is a change of attitude

Today the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has published new guidelines for prosecuting hate crime, including taking online hate crime as seriously as hate crime committed in person. We welcome the new guidelines, but they will not address the principal problem that the CPS only very rarely prosecutes antisemites.

Having had our input into the consultation process, we do recognise the advance that this guidance makes by treating online hate crime just as seriously as hate crime committed in person, but the CPS should always have treated online hate crime just as seriously. It is already clear in law that hate crime must be prosecuted, and there is no legal basis for routinely giving some forms of hate crime less attention than others. We are pleased that the CPS recognises this, but the law has not changed and nor have the CPS’s obligations.

The reason for the failure of the CPS to prosecute antisemitism seems to be a matter of willpower, not a lack of proper guidance.

What concerns us is that we have seen the CPS make policy announcements before with great fanfare, but then they fail to take action. The relentless three-year rise in antisemitic crime has been met by a decrease in the already low prosecution rate for offences against Jews and a complete lack of transparency by the CPS with regard to the manner in which it deals with antisemitic crime.

In the years that we have been monitoring prosecutions for antisemitism, the CPS has yet to prosecute more than two dozen known cases per year, despite antisemitic crime having surged by 45% since 2014, which was itself an exceptionally terrible year for antisemitic crime. The paltry number of known prosecutions has a very damaging knock-on effect: police forces have to constantly assess how they are using resources, so when police officers put time and effort into investigating an antisemitic hate crime, only for the CPS to decline to prosecute it in spite of the evidence, then it follows that those police officers will be less likely to put the same time and effort into investigating similar antisemitic hate crimes that are reported to them. At the same time, antisemites who are permitted by the CPS to escape punishment, are often emboldened and more likely to reoffend.

Our latest polling of the Jewish community shows the extent to which it has lost confidence in the will of the criminal justice system to protect it. Unless the CPS changes its stance towards crimes committed against Jews, the perpetrators will be emboldened to continue offending and Britain’s Jewish population will continue to worry that it does not have a long-term future in this country.

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CAA research shows that antisemitism is falling, but 1 in 3 British Jews has considered emigrating, with concern mounting over antisemitic crime and antisemitism in politics

Campaign Against Antisemitism (CAA) has announced the results of our Antisemitism Barometer research, a multiyear study conducted by CAA and YouGov.

We now have data that show that in a very British way, fairly and quietly, Britons have been rejecting antisemitic prejudice. British society has shunned a growing worldwide addiction to antisemitism and proved that so-called British values are no mere buzzphrase, but are embedded in our national being.

However, our research shows that British Jews have become so fearful of mounting antisemitic crime and the failure to excise antisemites from politics that they have increasingly considered leaving Britain altogether. Our research clearly shows that British Jews have pointed their fingers at the Crown Prosecution Service and the Labour Party.

If British society can fight antisemitism, why are our world-renowned criminal justice system and some of our famous political parties still doing too little?

YouGov was commissioned by CAA to survey attitudes towards Jews amongst the British population in 2015, 2016 and 2017, and CAA worked with partners in the Jewish community to survey British Jews’ responses to antisemitism in 2016 and 2017. The YouGov sample sizes were 3,411 in 2015, 1,660 in 2016, and 1,614 in 2017. CAA sample sizes were 1,857 in 2016, and 2,025 in 2017. The results of our survey of British Jews cannot be compared to a similar we conducted in 2015, due to a substantial change in our methodology. The full report is available on our website.

The research has revealed that almost a third of British Jews have considered leaving the UK in the past two years.

Only 59% of British Jews feel welcome in the UK, and 17% feel unwelcome. For the past two years, 37% of British Jews have been concealing their Judaism in public.

Last month, CAA published police figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act showing that there has been a 45% surge in antisemitic crime since 2014. Additionally CAA revealed that the CPS has yet to prosecute more than two dozen antisemitic crimes per year.

52% of British Jews said that the CPS is not doing enough to fight antisemitism, and only 39% of British Jews felt confident that antisemitic hate crime would be prosecuted.

76% of British Jews feel that recent political events have resulted in increased hostility towards Jews, and for two years, more than 4 in 5 British Jews have considered the Labour Party to be harbouring antisemites in its ranks.

The failure of the criminal justice system and political parties to tackle antisemitism is in stark contrast with the attitudes of the British public towards Jews. YouGov’s polling for CAA found that antisemitism, measured by how many respondents agreed with seven antisemitic statements, has been in decline for the past three years. In 2015, 45% of British people held at least one antisemitic view, but that fell to 39% in 2016 and then dropped again to 36% in 2017.

In the report, CAA calls on the Government to urgently implement the recommendations of our last two National Antisemitic Crime Audits, and for all political parties to adopt our manifesto for fighting antisemitism. Our recommendations for the criminal justice system include basic measures such as producing specific training and guidance on antisemitic hate crime for officers and prosecutors, instructing Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary to review all police forces’ responses to antisemitic crime, appointing a senior officer in each force with responsibility for overseeing the response to antisemitic hate crime, and requiring the Crown Prosecution Service to record and regularly publish details of cases involving antisemitism and their outcomes, as police forces are already required to do. Our recommendations for political parties are to adopt the Government’s definition of antisemitism, as many have, and to enforce it using transparent and robust disciplinary processes, with expulsion from the party in the worst cases.

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Law firm partner Majid Mahmood ordered to pay £34,595 by tribunal after CAA instigates proceedings over antisemitic Facebook posts

Majid Mahmood, a partner at City Law Chambers in Luton and a director at Liberty Law Solicitors, has been fined £25,000 and ordered to pay costs of £9,595 by the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal, in a case instigated by Campaign Against Antisemitism over antisemitic social media posts. Mr Mahmood was also suspended as a solicitor for 12 months but that period of suspension is itself suspended, so he can continue to practice as a solicitor unless he reoffends.

In 2016, a member of the public saw antisemitic Facebook comments posted by Mr Mahmood, which he posted underneath a video about the airlifting of Jewish refugees. Mr Mahmood commented: “The aint gods chosen people they’re Satans love child’s and it’s a shame e the plane carrying them didn’t blow up mid air [all sic].” When another user remonstrated with him, he told them to: “go and f*** yourself.”

The member of the public reported Mr Mahmood to Campaign Against Antisemitism, which submitted a complaint to the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA). The SRA obtained an apology from Mr Mahmood and warned him not to post such comments again, and was minded to leave the matter there. When Campaign Against Antisemitism took the first steps in taking legal action against the SRA, the matter was escalated to the SRA’s senior management, which corrected the decision and instead of closing the matter instead opened a formal regulatory investigation.

Upon reviewing its files, the SRA found that in 2015 Mr Mahmood had posted on Facebook: “Somebody needs to shoot all the Israeli Zionists dead then send their bodies to America as a present for Obama and his Zionist pals.” A member of public had reported the comment to the SRA but it was not reported to Campaign Against Antisemitism at the time, and the SRA took no action on that occasion.

The SRA brought a case against Mr Mahmood at the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal, alleging that: “On 13 October 2015 and 14 February 2016, he publicly communicated antisemitic and/or offensive and wholly inappropriate posts from his Facebook account contrary to Principles 2/1 and 6/2 of the SRA Principles 2011.”

Mr Mahmood, one of whose firm’s website states that “the principal [sic] of equal opportunity and diversity are fundamental to our continuing success”, denied that he was antisemitic, pointing to the fact that he had some Jewish friends. However, the SRA, expertly represented by David Bennett, successfully argued that “The content of both posts was unambiguously antisemitic” and “indicated a preference for lethal violence”. Ironically, one of Mr Mahmood’s firms, Liberty Law Solicitors had produced a pamphlet warning of the dangers of an “employee’s conduct on social media bringing the business into disrepute”.

The Tribunal ruled that: “The intemperate language used, the hatred manifested, including against anti-Zionists as well as Jewish people, and wishing them dead by graphic means were terrible ideas for a solicitor to be promoting” and ordered that Mr Mahmood must “pay a fine of £25,000, such penalty to be forfeit to Her Majesty the Queen” and that he must also “pay costs of and incidental to this application and enquiry in the sum of £9,595.” The Tribunal also ordered that Mr Mahmood “be suspended from practice as a solicitor for the period of 12 months from 2nd August 2017, that period of suspension to be suspended for 12 months from the same date.”

We are particularly pleased that in the Tribunal ruled that there is no such thing as a minor antisemitic act. When the Tribunal decided to apply a fine at the “upper end of the scale”, Mr Mahmood’s barrister, Gregory Treverton-Jones QC, argued that Mr Mahmood’s antisemitism was at the “lowest end”. The Tribunal ruled that “it was not open to a solicitor to behave in a more or less antisemitic way; he either behaved in an antisemitic way or he did not…[Mr Mahmood] advocated violence against Zionists and Jews. He had no way of knowing how a particularly impressionable individual with a propensity for reading the public Facebook pages on which his posts were published would respond. His behaviour was reprehensible and not to be minimised.”

Gideon Falter, Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism, was a witness for the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Tribunal acknowledged the work done by Campaign Against Antisemitism, writing in its 39-page ruling: “It is disappointing that antisemitism continues to exist. In recent years there has been significant work done by organisations such as Mr Falter’s to educate and inform the public so as to reduce the incidences of antisemitism. It was very disappointing that a solicitor in February 2016 was espousing views in social media that the Tribunal had determined on the facts to be antisemitic.”

Whilst we do not agree with the decision to allow Mr Mahmood, who has repeatedly made vile statements calling for death and destruction, to remain in practice as an officer of the court, we nonetheless welcome this decision. We commend the Solicitors Regulation Authority for doing the right thing in bringing this action, and we applaud the Tribunal for sending this strong message that antisemitism within the legal profession will be severely punished.

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Police investigating after man allegedly shouts “I am the next Hitler and I am going to kill you” at Jewish Tube passenger

Police are investigating a shocking antisemitic tirade in which a man reportedly shouted at a Jewish passenger on the London Underground: “I am the next Hitler and I am going to kill you.” According to a report in the JC, police are treating the incident as a hate crime. The Jewish passenger, who wears a Jewish skullcap, or kippah, is a solicitor who works in the City of London, and he was travelling home to Golders Green on the Northern Line on Wednesday, when the incident occurred.

The passenger, who did not wish to be named, explained to the JC that he feared for his life when the man shouted at him: “I am the next Hitler and I am going to kill you,” gesturing with his hand to simulate a gun, and making a “bang” sound to indicate a bullet being fired.

He told the JC that the man had got on the train at Old Street station and sat down opposite him. The man said: “The moment he sat down, he stretched his legs out to me and started nudging me. He then removed his legs and starting swearing at me extremely loudly. After about a minute of non-stop abuse he got up and went towards the doors and came back to show me a picture on his phone which said something about ‘Jews killing babies.’…It was clear to me and everybody in the carriage that he was targeting me because I am a Jew. I was extremely shocked at being spoken to like that and when he approached me with his phone I was extremely scared and expecting him to punch me at any moment.”

The suspect alighted at Angel station, the next stop, at which point the Jewish passenger left the carriage at the front of the train where he had been sitting and went to the driver’s cabin to report the incident. He said: “The driver told me that she heard the shouting and had alerted the police, who were waiting at the platform when we got to Euston, two stops further along the line. The police took a statement from me and another passenger on the train.”

A spokesperson for British Transport Police (BTP) said: “Officers are investigating after a 31-year-old man was verbally abused by a fellow passenger. The incident happened on board a Northern Line Tube service from Old Street to Euston on Wednesday, 16th August.  Anyone who was travelling on board the service and witnessed the incident is asked to call BTP on 0800 40 50 40.”

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Youths reportedly direct Nazi salutes at Jewish family on Canvey Island in Essex

A group of youths has reportedly directed Nazi salutes at an orthodox Jewish family on Canvey Island in Essex. A woman who witnessed the incident but asked not to be identified, told the Echo News that “We have a lovely family of orthodox Jews living near us. The family were outside minding their own business when three kids rode past on scooters — no older than 8-9 yrs old — stopped to take the time to do the Nazi salute. How rude and disrespectful. Total scumbags.”

Joel Friedman, a member of the local Jewish community posted a response to the alleged incident on social media. He said that: “Every single one of us orthodox Jews lost numerous relatives during the Holocaust. My grandparents lost the vast majority of their families and barely made it out alive. I’ve had plenty of Nazi salutes and Heil Hitlers thrown my way over the years and [it reminds] me of my grandfather with whom I was extremely close.”

He added that “In the vast majority of cases the perpetrators are teenagers, bored and uneducated if I my say so. Since my move to Canvey just over a year ago, personally I have had little negative experiences. The absolute vast majority are friendly, supportive, accepting and just treat us as equals — which is what we all are. I am so proud of Canvey and of its residents, neighbours, shop owners etc — you are all such a friendly bunch and supportive and for this I thank you from the depth of my heart.”

The Echo News reported that a community of orthodox charedi Jews had begun moving to the island from Stamford Hill “after being forced out of London by high rents.” The newspaper said that they chose Canvey Island “due to the community spirit and the former Castle View School site which they have bought and will turn into a Jewish school.”

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National Action reportedly recruiting, training and working out of a converted warehouse in Warrington

An investigation has revealed that the banned pro-Hitler organisation National Action is actively recruiting, training and working out of a converted warehouse in Warrington. National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

National Action allegedly has a new and secretive leader, Christopher Lythgoe, who has been tasked with rebuilding the group beyond the spotlight. The remaining 80 members of National Action are not all reportedly permitted to know where their training base is, but are providing the thousands of pounds needed to rent and refurbish the warehouse into a gym and an office.

Last month, the Crown Prosecution Service decided to prosecute National Action’s former spokesman, Jack Renshaw, after lawyers for Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to declare our intention to launch a private prosecution. Renshaw has now been charged with two offences of incitement to racial hatred in relation to speeches made in February and March last year, as well as his tweets.

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West Dunbartonshire Council refuses to sever ties with group whose leaders share antisemitic conspiracy myths

The leaders of West Dunbartonshire Supports the People of Palestine (WDSPP) in Scotland have reportedly shared shocking antisemitic posts on social media, but they apparently continue to enjoy the support of West Dunbartonshire Council. This support allegedly included making council premises available for WDSPP events, publicising the group’s activities on the council’s website, and even providing funding.

A researcher, David Collier, has meticulously uncovered appalling antisemitic conspiracy myths social media by leading members of WDSPP. Some of the graphic examples allegedly include sharing links that accuse the Israeli Secret Service, Mossad, of murdering Princess Diana; accuse a Mossad agent of being responsible for the 7/7 London bombings; accuse Israel of harvesting Ukrainian childrens’ organs; support the idea that Israel controls the US Congress; and allege that the leader of ISIS is a Mossad agent and that Israel is training ISIS terrorists.

They also allegedly shared links to modern-day antisemitic hate preacher, David Icke, to a Holocaust denial website about “Rothchild Zionism” and to an article and caricature claiming that six million Jewish deaths was a lie and only a total of only 271,000 Jews died in Nazi concentration camps.

Mr Collier also reported that these activists are involved with the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign (SPSC). This comes in the wake of his 160-page report that confirmed widespread antisemitism inside the SPSC. The report, titled “Jew Hate and Holocaust Denial in Scotland” was the result of two years of research and investigation into the activities of the SPSC.

When alerted to the posts, Council Leader Jonathan McColl replied: “The shared posts are quite clearly the worst kind of conspiracy theory nonsense, designed to cause offence, and in no way contribute to sensible debate. That said, having looked at what you have sent, I cannot see anything written by any of the individuals on behalf of the group they are involved in that could be seen as racist.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on West Dunbartonshire Council should show that it is serious about countering antisemitism by formally adopting the International Definition of Antisemitism, and then applying it by having nothing further to do with WDSPP.

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90-year-old man convicted after displaying “Pull the chain, flush the Jew mafia down the drain” placard in Brighton

Sussex Police has confirmed that 90-year-old Paul Pawlowski has been convicted for displaying a placard including the words: “Pull the chain, flush the Jew mafia down the drain” on the Old Steine, Brighton at 12.20 on 28th May. When confronted, Mr Pawlowski, a Burgess Hill resident, told officers that if they took his antisemitic placard and leaflets, he would walk up and down North Street and shout his views, which included other antisemitic messages.

On Tuesday, Brighton Magistrates’ Court fined him £100, which was increased to £150 because of the antisemitic nature of his crime, and also ordered him to pay costs of £100 and a victim surcharge of £85.

Sussex Police hate crime sergeant, Peter Allan said: “I am pleased the court convicted the defendant in this case. People have a right to free speech, but hate speech will not be tolerated. If hate speech is not challenged appropriately, it can lead to communities feeling a sense of unease and can send a message to perpetrators that such behaviour is acceptable. This sentence sends out a clear signal that we will take a robust approach to those who target individuals based on their disability, gender identity, race, religion or sexual orientation. I hope this case will encourage other victims of hate to report such behaviour to the police. We will record all such incidents and take them seriously. We will investigate any allegations, irrespective of the age or any other demographic of those involved.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks Sergeant Allan for his principled statement and commends Sussex Police for sending a strong message that they will not tolerate antisemitic hate crime.

We would like to thank Sussex Friends of Israel for providing information about this case.

Image credit: Andy Leates

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Police downgrade targeting of Jewish men in London by bicycle gang that squirted liquid over one victim

On Tuesday evening, in separate incidents, a gang of three young men riding Transport for London’s public hire bicycles targeted two orthodox charedi members of the Jewish community in Stamford Hill. In the first incident, which occurred close to Morrisons supermarket, they snatched and rode away with the victim’s hat. Later that evening, at approximately 22:30, the same gang targeted another charedi Jewish man. When they were unsuccessful in their attempt to knock the second victim’s hat to the ground, they squirted him with liquid. With the well-publicised rise in acid attacks in the capital, this was extremely alarming for the victim, who said that he attempted to notify the police by dialing 999 but gave up after a lengthy wait for a response. Fortunately the liquid turned out to be water.

The first victim was visited by an officer from the Metropolitan Police Service who, we understand, told him that they would treat the incident as a theft that they expect to be unable to solve, rather than an antisemitic hate crime. The two victims were clearly targeted because of their distinctive appearance. It is therefore surprising that the police have reportedly decided to dismiss religion as an aggravating factor. It is also disappointing, given the prevalence of CCTV in the area, that they have so quickly given up hope of finding the culprits, who would have had to rent their bicycles using traceable credit or debit cards. If anybody has information that might assist the police in identifying these men, they should report it by dialing 101, and e-mailing investigations@antisemitism.uk.

Both of the victims contacted Stamford Hill Shomrim, a volunteer Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol, which referred the cases to Campaign Against Antisemitism for assistance.

We are raising the matter with the Metropolitan Police Service.

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University of Bristol drops CAA’s complaint against lecturer who claimed “primary victims” of Holocaust are Palestinians

The University of Bristol has decided to take no action against a lecturer, Dr Rebecca Gould, over an article in which she claimed that “privileging the Holocaust as the central event in Jewish history” should end and that “the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people.”

The university’s Deputy Vice Chancellor and Provost, Professor Guy Orpen, wrote: “it is our considered opinion that Dr Gould’s article is not antisemitic and does not breach the proper bounds of freedom of speech and academic freedom” in a letter to the Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism. The decision was reached by a panel appointed by the university, in response to a letter from Campaign Against Antisemitism dissecting the article’s antisemitic passages. The verdict has been published on the university’s website.

Dr Gould’s article titled “Beyond Antisemitism” was published in the radical left-wing Counter Punch magazine edition of November 2011. Dr Gould wrote: “Defining the Shoah vis-a-vis the Greek (and, incidentally, Christian) term for a sacrifice to G-d has helped make it available to manipulation by governmental elites, aiming to promote the narrative most likely to underwrite their claims to sovereignty. Claiming the Holocaust as a holy event sanctifies the state of Israel and whitewashes its crimes.” She added: “perhaps the time has come to stop privileging the Holocaust as the central event in Jewish history.” She concluded the article: “As the situation stands today, the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic. Additionally, according to the expert legal opinion commissioned by Campaign Against Antisemitism, contending that either Jews, Israel or the West have “manipulated” the Holocaust to generate sympathy for Jews or for Israel or prevent criticism of them is an allegation “chosen to be emotive and upsetting to Jewish people and to generate hostility towards them.”

The article appeared on various websites but it seems to have disappeared from all but one website which offered a PDF download.

According to the University of Bristol School of Modern Languages website, the lecturer has a PhD from Columbia University and is a Reader in Translation Studies & Comparative Literature. She taught previously at New York University, Columbia University, and Yale-NUS College in Singapore and specialises in the literatures of the Persian and Islamic world (especially the Caucasus). She is “happy to supervise in the areas of Middle Eastern and Central Asian literatures and cultures, translation studies, Islamic studies, comparative literature, critical theory, and modern Iran”.

Dr Gould has not expressed any remorse and sent us the following statement: “A complaint was made by Campaign Against Antisemitism in relation to an article I published in 2011, which discussed the exploitation of the Holocaust by government elites in order to advance certain policy agendas. I refute any suggestion that the article contained antisemitic material; as I have publicly stated, it was a rallying call to people of conscience horrified by the slaughter of six million Jews to speak out against injustice everywhere…I stand firmly opposed to racism in all forms, from antisemitism to Islamophobia, and in support of academic freedom. The complaint was dismissed by the university which made a public statement that the article was not antisemitic and was within the ambit of academic freedom.”

Any current student at the University of Bristol can appeal this verdict, and Campaign Against Antisemitism will provide support to any student wishing to do so. If you are a student at the University of Bristol and would like to know more, please e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

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Elite football school reportedly failing to tackle extremism as pupils act out Nazi profiling on suspected Jews and hum marching songs in corridors

An investigation by the Sunday Telegraph has uncovered antisemitism and far-right extremism at Rainhill High School, the nominated school for players enrolled in Liverpool Football Club’s academy. A series of whistleblowers have said that they believe that far-right extremism is endemic at the school, claiming that the management are failing to tackle the problem.

A whistleblower has told the Sunday Telegraph that “The lads have tried measuring other pupils noses to see if they are Jews and shouting ‘we are the SS, kill the Jews’ during a lunch break.” The newspaper was also told that Nazi memorabilia, including a helmet, and a flag associated with white supremacy were paraded through corridors, and that students sometimes “walk around humming Nazi marching music.”

One student was featured in a photo on the front page of the school’s newsletter allegedly giving the “Isis salute”, a gesture of support for the self-proclaimed Islamic caliphate. The headmaster later apologised, saying it was “issued in error” and removed the newsletter from the school’s website.

According to the newspaper, parents and teachers have raised their concerns with Ofsted and their trade union due to fears that the school was failing to tackle the problem. The school, however, has reportedly denied the allegations made in the investigation, but said that three students have been referred through Prevent, the Government’s counter-extremism strategy. One of the students had allegedly desecrated a cenotaph and another who had told a fellow pupil: “you’re so skinny you should be in Auschwitz.”

Headmaster John Pout told the Sunday Telegraph: “In my opinion we have not got an issue with right-wing extremism at Rainhill High School. The three isolated cases that have been brought to our attention have been dealt with quickly and thoroughly. We have been commended by Merseyside Police for our actions on these incidents.”

Pupils at the school have been identified as talented football players and some play for Liverpool Football Club’s under-18 team, but the club declined to give a comment to the Sunday Telegraph.

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Neo-Nazi Holocaust denial event in Holborn cancelled following intervention from CAA

A secret meeting of neo-Nazi Holocaust deniers scheduled for tomorrow evening at a community centre in Holborn in central London has been cancelled following intervention from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The meeting was part of the “Keep Talking” series of meetings organised by conspiracy theorist, Ian Fantom. Campaign Against Antisemitism informed the venue about the true nature of the meeting following a tip-off from Searchlight.

A recent Keep Talking event in nearby Camden saw notorious Holocaust denier Nick Kollerstrom attempt to speak, before the meeting was cancelled by Camden council, after pressure from activists. Copies of Kollerstrom’s Holocaust denying books have reportedly been on open sale at previous Keep Talking meetings.

According to Searchlight, an invitation to tomorrow’s meeting was allegedly circulated among London’s top neo-Nazis by the far-right London Forum organiser, Jeremy Bedford-Turner. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss conspiracy theories about the death of Princess Diana.

In March, a landmark High Court judicial review action brought by Campaign Against Antisemitism forced the Crown Prosecution Service to cancel its decision not to prosecute Bedford-Turner over an antisemitic speech to neo-Nazis in July 2015.

The Keep Talking meetings were started in the United States in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The conspiracy theory group has spread the antisemitic lies that Jews were behind the tragedy and that Jews working in the World Trade Centre towers were warned not to attend work on the day of the attacks.

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks Searchlight for bringing this event to our attention, and we commend the venue for taking swift action in cancelling it.

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Government confirms to CAA that all cooperation with the British University in Egypt has stopped

Following a speech, translated by Campaign Against Antisemitism, in which Mohamed Farid Fouad Khamis, Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the British University in Egypt (BUE) and one of its principal donors, promoted the antisemitic Protocols of the Elders of Zion, we wrote to the British Government to obtain assurances that the BUE would receive no further assistance whilst Mr Khamis remained associated with it. Mr Khamis’ speech, delivered at an event in March, was no mere passing reference to the antisemitic Protocols, but contained long passages in which he claimed that rabbis had convened to decide how Jews should control the world.

We have now received assurances that the Government and Loughborough University have already terminated their association with the BUE, with the final contract ending in December.

The Minister of State for International Development, the Rt Hon. Alistair Burt MP, confirmed to us in a letter that the Department for International Development does not provide assistance to BUE, writing: “I share your commitment to tackle antisemitism in all its forms, including in the perpetuation of the slanders within the Protocols of the Elders of Zion…I note your concerns about BUE very carefully. Thank you.”

The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) confirmed that Loughborough University previously had a validation agreement with the BUE, whereby students passing courses at the BUE would receive their degree from Loughborough University, however the agreement was terminated in 2012. Under the termination clause of the agreement, the final degrees will be awarded in December this year, at which point the relationship will end.

We are pleased that the Department for International Development and HEFCE have investigated the matter thoroughly and, in the case of the former, that the matter has received ministerial oversight.

The only association with Britain that the BUE now has is its name.

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Children arrive at playground in Essex to find their swings, slides and climbing frames covered in antisemitic graffiti and swastikas

A children’s playground in Mace Park in the seaside town of Dovercourt in Essex has reportedly been vandalised with antisemitic and racist graffiti, including swastikas. According to the Harwich and Manningtree Standard, the playground’s swings, slides and climbing frames were all daubed with racist messages.

In photographs published by the newspaper, a swastika is clearly visible painted in black on a pink swing and the word “Jew” is scrawled in black on the blue roof of a climbing frame.

Nigel Brown, Tendring Council’s communications manager, told the newspaper that “An officer has been over to inspect the site and it is our aim to have the equipment steam cleaned tomorrow to remove all the graffiti.” Dave McLeod, Harwich Town councillor for the area, hit out at the vandalism, commenting: “I am totally disgusted quite honestly. The park is somewhere for children to enjoy and people have spoilt it. What is the deterrent? Do we really need CCTV on our play areas?”

Local parents and families are reportedly furious about the graffiti and have spoken out in disgust. One grandmother who takes her four-year-old grandson to the park said: “What if my grandson was to ask me what it means? I wouldn’t know what to say to him.”

Anybody with information should contact Essex Police on 101 and e-mail investigations@antisemitism.uk.

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Arbroath residents tear down propaganda from new antisemitic extremist group seeking “a white Britain, free from Jewish usury”

Angry locals in Arbroath in Scotland have torn up propaganda from Vanguard Britannia, a right-wing white nationalist antisemitic movement. In one of the offensive flyers, the group blamed Jews, who they allege control the judiciary, media and government, “for pushing mass immigration of Muslims” and to “replace” white Britons, proclaiming: “we stand firm against white genocide.”

According to a report by The Courier, Vanguard Britannia was trying to boost their membership, but they were thwarted by local residents who tore down the shocking material which they described as “awful”, “truly chilling” and “terrible.”

In a tweet, the group challenged residents: “Tear it down and we’ll put it right back up with more.”

Vanguard Britannia started in the UK in June and appears to be a British version of Vanguard America, a self-described fascist movement. On their website, the group states: “Vanguard Britannia envisions a white Britain, free from Jewish usury, media control, and non-white immigration. It continues: “Are you filled with anger towards the politicians that allow for our children to be raped, run over and torn apart by bombs, while lining their pockets with the money of (((globalist entities))), ensuring their loyalty to their masters over their loyalty to you as your representative to follow the anti-Western agenda pushed by Marxists and Zionists? Then join the Vanguard and lead the fight for your family, for your nation, and for your people. When the Sun sets, we must rise.”

In the most recent update on their website, they blame Jews for immigration and link to a video on their YouTube page: “Our video ‘Who’s Behind the Migrant Crisis?’ has been spread across many channels and platforms, and shows that we shall not hold back from naming the Jew. We must spread the information far and wide, in both the digital and physical realms, and educate all on the evils the Jew wreaks upon our lands and people.”

Another poster on the website, covered in the Star of David, appears to blame the Jews for everything from white genocide to pedophilia.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds The Courier for exposing Vanguard Brittania and for the local residents of Arbroath for standing up to this hate.

We will be discussing this extremist group with social networks and the authorities.

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Labour selects Councillor Luke Cresswell, who tweeted “Moses must be proud” of supposed genocide, to run in by-election

Labour Councillor Luke Cresswell has been selected as the Labour candidate in the Sudbury South by-election. In the past, we have highlighted Councillor Creswell’s disturbing tweets, but rather than being disciplined by the Labour Party, it appears that Councillor Cresswell enjoys the Party’s continuing support.

In one, he tweeted a blood-drenched Israeli flag accusing Israel of genocide, captioned “Moses must be proud of you”. In another tweet, he uses a cartoon to portray Israelis as the new Nazis.

Under the International Definition of Antisemitism, “using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is antisemitic, as it “drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis”.

Councillor Cresswell also made clear his support for Ken Livingstone in a Facebook comment after Mr Livingstone claimed that “Hitler was supporting Zionism”.

Confronted over the tweets by other Twitter users at the time, Councillor Cresswell defended the tweets, claiming that “it is nothing to do with religion”, but his reference to Moses, for example, rather contradicts him. Councillor Cresswell now appears to have deleted his Twitter account.

Councillor Cresswell has not yet responded to a request for comment.

We are grateful to the Labour Party members who brought Councillor Cresswell’s selection to our attention.

If you would like to join our Political and Government Investigations Unit, our Online Monitoring Unit, or one of our other teams, please volunteer.

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Charles Panayi convicted in antisemitic road rage case, ordered to pay £1,620 and carry out 200 hours of community service

‘Christopher’ Charles Panayi was convicted of racially aggravated criminal damage on Monday last week over an antisemitic road rage incident.

Mr Panayi became abusive towards a Jewish man at the junction of Conley Hatch Lane and the A406 on 31st January, stopping his car multiple times, exposing his buttocks and parting them, calling a Jewish man a “F***ing Jewish prick”, punching the Jewish man’s car window and smashing his wing mirror.

Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol provided evidence to the Metropolitan Police Service resulting in Mr Panayi’s prosecution.

Hendon Magistrates’ Court ordered Mr Panayi to carry out 200 hours of unpaid community service work, and to pay £1,000 in compensation and £620 in prosecution costs. He was also handed a 12-week prison sentence, suspended for a year.

A spokesman for North West London Shomrim said: “Charles Panayi was racist, abusive, violent and out of control. We are pleased that we were able to provide the Metropolitan Police Service with evidence leading to Mr Panayi’s arrest, prosecution and conviction.”

We commend North West London Shomrim, the police and the Crown Prosecution Service for ensuring that Charles Panayi has suffered the consequences of his disgusting antisemitic abuse. Rising antisemitic crime must be met with zero tolerance law enforcement.

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Police investigate after Cardiff electronic billboard hacked to display Nazi flag and far-right messages

South Wales Police are investigating after hackers reprogrammed an electronic billboard to display a Nazi flag, images of Donald Trump as a frog, a poster proclaiming that “Big Brother is watching you”, and a notice warning that shariah law is supposedly being imposed.

A police spokesperson told Wales Online: “On Tuesday evening South Wales Police received a number of calls relating to concerns regarding messages being displayed on the screens in Queen Street, Cardiff. We alerted the City Council and will investigate any crimes which may have been committed.”

The billboard has now been switched off until it can be fixed.

The hack appeared to be the work of hackers using online forum 4chan which is notorious for its antisemitic and racist memes.

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Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign rejects in-depth report forensically detailing antisemitism within their movement as a “smear”

A newly-released 160-page report has confirmed widespread antisemitism inside the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign (SPSC). The report, titled “Jew Hate and Holocaust Denial in Scotland” is the result of two years of research and investigation into the activities of the SPSC, particularly on social media, by researcher David Collier. The report corroborates our own report into antisemitism inside the Palestine Solidarity Campaign released in February.

Predictably, instead of investigating and taking action over the report’s revelations, the SPSC responded by dismissing it. In a statement published on its website, the SPSC said that it “is not inclined to take seriously the so-called ‘research’ of a pro-Israel blogger whose primary purpose is to smear organisations that support Palestinian rights”.

According to Mr Collier: “At every event checked, on every high street, at every demonstration, those pushing hard-core antisemitic ideology were at the very front of SPSC activity. Two separate case studies suggested that between 40% and 50% of SPSC front line activists (at a minimum) engage in sharing Jew-hating material.”

In one case study, the investigation uncovered that of the sixty-one activists listed as present at the “No to Brand Israel at Edinburgh Festival” protest organised outside the Shalom Festival by the SPSC, thirty-one of them posted antisemitic content on social media. This included antisemitic images, promoting the conspiracy theory about global Jewish domination and Holocaust denial. This breaches the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government.

The report found numerous activists sharing everything from far-left claims that ISIS is an oil-stealing apparatus of Mossad, the Israeli intelligence agency, through to claims about the Holocaust which the uninitiated would consider to be the preserve of the far-right.

The report found: “The inevitable conclusion is that antisemitic tendency is a primary driver of anti-Israel activism…There is a strong probability that those who are introduced to anti-Israel material by SPSC activists on the streets are being influenced by people who adhere to an antisemitic mindset…Much of this activity seeks to spread antisemitic thought.”

Mick Napier, the Secretary of the SPSC, was a key focus of the report. Last month, Mr Napier was found guilty in court of aggressive behavior at a protest outside an Israeli-owned cosmetics store in Glasgow during the 2014 Gaza war. Mr Napier was also a speaker at the pro-Hizballah Al Quds Day march in Central London on 18th June. Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted formal complaints over the “Al Quds Day” march.

We commend David Collier, and Jewish Human Rights Watch which commissioned the report, for producing such an important study.

Whilst the International Definition of Antisemitism clearly states that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic”, it is very evident that in the anti-Israel movement, flagrantly antisemitic prejudices are widely-held and publicised.

The line between legitimate political discourse about Israel and antisemitism was expertly analysed in the legal opinion commissioned by Campaign Against Antisemitism, but sadly it is a line that many anti-Israel activists appear to be happy to cross, and which too major anti-Israel organisations appear to tolerate. It would seem from its response to the report that SPSC can safely be added to that list. Indeed, the SPSC website includes a section on antisemitism (a word which it places quotation marks around) and that section is subdivided into sections entitled “smears” and “legal attacks”.

SPSC appears to enjoy the support of numerous MPs and MSPs. Until the organisation takes credible steps to address the antisemitism within their movement, starting with the formal adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, support for the SPSC should be considered beyond the pale.

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CAA writes to Sajid Javid after review of evidence from Palestine Expo finds concerns over antisemitism and extremism were well founded

Campaign Against Antisemitism has now analysed a large volume of evidence captured by the brave volunteers of our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit who attended Palestine Expo earlier this month, and also evidence from members of the public who sent us videos us or posted them on social media.

Palestine Expo 2017 was held on 8th and 9th July at the government-owned Queen Elizabeth II Centre in Westminster, opposite the Houses of Parliament.

The organiser, Friends of Al-Aqsa, chose to advertise a number of controversial speakers, which gave cause for concern about what the nature of the event would be. Prior to the event, we wrote to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government warning about the risk of giving a platform to speakers with a history of making extremely troubling statements. Had the event merely been “the biggest social, cultural and entertainment event on Palestine to ever take place in Europe”, as it was advertised to be, we would not have objected, but sadly our concerns were proven to be correct.

We will now be writing to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government again, this time asking for his assurance that he will intervene should the organisers attempt to hold another event at the government-owned venue. We will include the following concerning speeches and incidents in our letter.

First, in a speech on “Democratic Engagement and Justice for Palestinians”, Tariq Ramadan, an Egyptian-Swiss academic, claimed that the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group, Hamas, should not be regarded as terrorists, stating: “Netanyahu said that, just in 2001, what we heard is ‘what you’ve got in the States, is what we are getting in Israel.’ As if, Al Qaeda is exactly like Hamas and the Palestinian resistance. By saying that they are all terrorists, that’s exactly the game. And we are saying we contain terrorists? But there is a legitimate resistance to your state terrorism. Your state terrorism. What you are doing with the civilians in Gaza or in the West Bank, the way you are treating the Palestinians — this is something which has to be said and we know there is a connection…This way of playing with the word terrorist, is like yesterday you were a terrorist, today you are a freedom fighter — the way they did with Mandela.” Hamas calls for the genocide of Jews worldwide, whilst committing and condoning terrorist attacks targeting civilians and oppressing Palestinians, for example by hurling homosexuals from rooftops. To suggest that they may merely be freedom fighters is a gross and deliberate distortion.

Next, Lina Hadid Bourichi, a lawyer, allegedly said “Lobbying? Let me tell you about lobbying. I come from Washington DC, OK, that is where I was born and raised. My mother is a Palestinian who was raised in Nazareth and kicked out with her family, the Hadid family, in 1948. Where I come from, the Jewish Lobby is omnipresent. AIPAC the American Jewish lobby is omnipresent. 40,000 employees and that’s the start. East Coast, West Coast, the centre.” AIPAC is not a “Jewish lobby”, nor does it have 40,000 employees pulling strings throughout the United States (Hadid Bourichi appears to have inflated the number by a factor of approximately one hundred). According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic.

In another speech, a speaker for a group called Free Speech on Israel allegedly stated that there were false accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party, saying: “So, we switch now quickly to the UK Labour Party. We’ve had this wave of false antisemitism accusations. I’m in the Labour Party, I know lots of people in the Labour Party, we’ve also been on the left, I’m sorry where’s this antisemitism? Doesn’t exist in the Labour Party, it’s less in the Labour Party than in the population at large and… even in my branch I’ve got a fairly right — the leadership of my Labour Party branch is still the Blairites, the right wingers — they don’t like being accused of antisemitism either, it’s a false program, it’s a false set of accusations.” We have extensively chronicled antisemitism in the Labour Party and we consider attempts to smear those Jews who complain of antisemitism as conspiratorial liars to be an antisemitic endeavour.

Disgraced Labour activist, Jackie Walker, also provided evidence of very concerning statements when she posted a number of videos on her Facebook page from the breakout session at Palestine Expo. In one of the videos , Professor Jonathan Rosenhead, an academic at the London School of Economics, can be heard defending Ken Livingstone, who claimed and maintains that Zionists collaborated with the Nazis, claiming: “What happened was that in a rather confused radio interview, [Ken] used the words ‘Hitler’ and ‘Zionism’ in the same sentence…What he did was to reveal in a slightly gullible way something which people should have known more about, which was the fact that the Zionists and the Hitler regime did combine together and talk about how to get more Jews out of Germany into Palestine in the 1930s. So…we’re supposed to say that Ken is an antisemite. He’s not, he’s a hero.” In another video, Rosenhead is heard making the spurious and discredited claim and myth about the invention of the Jewish people and that Ashkenazi Jews are descended from Khazars. He said that: “Interestingly enough, an Israeli historian, not the most favourite Israeli historian of Israelis, called Shlomo Sand, who gave quite convincing evidence that most Jews are not Jewish [laughter] in that a high proportion of them are actually the result of forced conversions in the Middle Ages in central Europe. So in fact not only have those people not been to Israel but none of their relatives ever came from Israel before.” We will be writing to the London School of Economics, requesting a disciplinary investigation into Professor Rosenhead’s comments.

Outside the venue, attendees also engaged in antisemitic discourse. David Collier, an activist who blogs about antisemitism and the Middle East, posted a video on YouTube of an unidentified man outside the venue who demanded: “Who founded Israel? Rothschild. Who was Rothschild everybody?…They might have the nuclear weapons, they might have the tanks, they might have the media, they might have the banking system, they might have everything on their side but Jesus has G-d on his side…Who gives them the right to pull money out of thin air and then lend it to us as interest.” The libel that Jews control banking, media and government is one of the most well-known antisemitic conspiracy myths, which explicitly falls foul of the International Definition of Antisemitism. A woman is also visible in the video performing a Nazi salute, in full view of security officers.

Another activist, Joseph Cohen, also posted a video from outside the event. In the footage, a young child could be seen dressed up in military uniform as worn by armed Palestinian groups, while an unnamed man asked: “Who’s under the table running the world?…Who’s got the money in America?…American Jewish.” When a Jewish man asked who has the money in the Middle East, the man replied: “The leaders, they’re your crooks.” In the background, a group stood outside the venue chanting “From the River to the Sea, Palestine will be free,” a chant that only makes sense as a call for the destruction of the Jewish state and its replacement with a Palestinian state. Under the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination” is antisemitic.

We are also concerned about the admissions policy in effect at the event which we believe may have breached the Human Rights Act and other legislation by discriminating against attendees on the basis of their political or religious beliefs. One man posted a video online in which he is asked to leave by the venue’s head of security and then a police officer, which the man alleges happened because he was wearing a Jewish skullcap. He claimed that he had been in the venue filming events peacefully for hours but was only ejected when he donned his skullcap. In the footage he posted, security officers are heard claiming that he was being asked to leave for filming, but numerous other bystanders were also filming without attracting attention from the venue or police officers. The incident is now being investigated by the police and the videos have been removed from social media. In another incident, notorious antisemite Tony Greenstein alerted security staff to the presence of the blogger David Collier who had gone to observe the event. Whilst eating lunch at the venue with his wife and child, at Greenstein’s behest, Mr Collier and his family were allegedly made to leave by the venue’s staff, which Mr Greenstein said he was responsible for arranging on the basis that Mr Collier is a “Zionist snoop”. Supporting Zionism (the movement for the Jewish people’s right to self-determination) is a perfectly legitimate position and no person should be excluded from a public event for adhering to it, particularly not at the behest of a well-known antisemite.

Having warned the Department for Communities and Local Government about the event in advance, we are disturbed that the government-owned venue, which is an executive agency of the government, did not appropriately train its security officers or monitor what was being said.

Prior to the event we also wrote a letter, along with military leaders and MPs, calling on the Prime Minister to ensure that the government acted on her pledge in the wake of the recent terrorist atrocities to “deprive the extremists of their safe spaces” and to “become far more robust in identifying [extremism] and stamping it out across the public sector and across society.” Palestine Expo 2017 was a failure to deliver on that promise which the Department for Communities and Local Government must learn from and not repeat.

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Sunday Times agrees to CAA recommendations: they will not employ Kevin Myers again and will print an apology

Following discussion between Campaign Against Antisemitism and News UK, which owns the Sunday Times, a further statement has been issued accepting our recommendations: “Further to our earlier statement we can confirm that Kevin Myers will not write again for the Sunday Times Ireland. A printed apology will appear in next week’s paper. The Sunday Times editor Martin Ivens has also apologised personally to Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz for these unacceptable comments both to Jewish people and to women in the workplace.”

The senior management of the Sunday Times previously sent Campaign Against Antisemitism an apology over the publication of an antisemitic column by Kevin Myers which has now been removed.

Martin Ivens, editor of the Sunday Times, said: “The comments in a column by Kevin Myers in today’s Irish edition of the Sunday Times were unacceptable and should not have been published. It has been taken down and we sincerely apologise both for the remarks and the error of judgement that led to publication.”

Frank Fitzgibbon, editor of the Sunday Times in Ireland, said: “On behalf of the Sunday Times I apologise unreservedly for the offence caused by comments in a column written by Kevin Myers and published today in the Ireland edition of the Sunday Times. It contained views that have caused considerable distress and upset to a number of people. As the editor of the Ireland edition I take full responsibility for this error of judgment. This newspaper abhors antisemitism and did not intend to cause offence to Jewish people.”

The column by Kevin Myers contained the following paragraph about the BBC pay row: “I note that two of the best-paid women presenters in the BBC — Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz, with whose, no doubt, sterling work I am tragically unacquainted — are Jewish. Good for them. Jews are not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price, which is the most useful measure there is of inveterate, lost-with-all-hands stupidity. I wonder, who are their agents? If they’re the same ones that negotiated the pay for the women on the lower scales, then maybe the latter have found their true value in the marketplace.”

The column has been removed from the online edition of the Sunday Times and we have now asked the Sunday Times for confirmation that Kevin Myers will never again work for a News UK title, and that the apology will appear in the print edition.

Myers is already known as a particularly unpleasant journalist who has called the children of single parents “bastards” and claimed that “Africa is giving nothing to anyone — apart from AIDS”. He has also devoted an entire column in the Belfast Telegraph to claiming that there was no Holocaust on the basis that not all of the Jews murdered by the Nazis were cremated, and attempting to nitpick over whether six million Jews really were murdered, claiming that the Holocaust had become a “dogma”. He wrote: “There was no holocaust, (or Holocaust, as my computer software insists) and six million Jews were not murdered by the Third Reich. These two statements of mine are irrefutable truths, yet their utterance could get me thrown in the slammer in half the countries of the EU.”

It is clear that Kevin Myers should not have been invited to write for the Sunday Times, and his editors should never have allowed the column to be published. That they removed the column and apologised for it within hours of its publication is proof that the decision to include the column was irrefutably wrong.

It is clear that the column breached clauses 12(i) and 12(ii) of the Independent Press Standards Organisation’s Editors’ Code and Principle 8 of the Irish Press Ombudsman’s Code of Practice by making discriminatory comments about Jews and also mentioning the religion of the Jewish BBC presenters at all.

In addition to no longer writing for the Sunday Times, we expect that Kevin Myers will no longer work as a journalist at any decent publication. We also understand that the Sunday Times will review its editorial procedures to examine how this lapse in editorial judgement was permitted in the first place.

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Sunday Times senior management sends CAA apology over antisemitic column, but we seek clarity on Kevin Myers’ future

The senior management of the Sunday Times has sent Campaign Against Antisemitism an apology over the publication of an antisemitic column by Kevin Myers which has now been removed.

Martin Ivens, editor of the Sunday Times, said: “The comments in a column by Kevin Myers in today’s Irish edition of the Sunday Times were unacceptable and should not have been published. It has been taken down and we sincerely apologise both for the remarks and the error of judgement that led to publication.”

Frank Fitzgibbon, editor of the Sunday Times in Ireland, said: “On behalf of the Sunday Times I apologise unreservedly for the offence caused by comments in a column written by Kevin Myers and published today in the Ireland edition of the Sunday Times. It contained views that have caused considerable distress and upset to a number of people. As the editor of the Ireland edition I take full responsibility for this error of judgment. This newspaper abhors antisemitism and did not intend to cause offence to Jewish people.”

The column by Kevin Myers contained the following paragraph about the BBC pay row: “I note that two of the best-paid women presenters in the BBC — Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz, with whose, no doubt, sterling work I am tragically unacquainted — are Jewish. Good for them. Jews are not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price, which is the most useful measure there is of inveterate, lost-with-all-hands stupidity. I wonder, who are their agents? If they’re the same ones that negotiated the pay for the women on the lower scales, then maybe the latter have found their true value in the marketplace.”

The column has been removed from the online edition of the Sunday Times and we have now asked the Sunday Times for confirmation that Kevin Myers will never again work for a News UK title, and that the apology will appear in the print edition.

Myers is already known as a particularly unpleasant journalist who has called the children of single parents “bastards” and claimed that “Africa is giving nothing to anyone — apart from AIDS”. He has also devoted an entire column in the Belfast Telegraph to claiming that there was no Holocaust on the basis that not all of the Jews murdered by the Nazis were cremated, and attempting to nitpick over whether six million Jews really were murdered, claiming that the Holocaust had become a “dogma”. He wrote: “There was no holocaust, (or Holocaust, as my computer software insists) and six million Jews were not murdered by the Third Reich. These two statements of mine are irrefutable truths, yet their utterance could get me thrown in the slammer in half the countries of the EU.”

It is clear that Kevin Myers should not have been invited to write for the Sunday Times, and his editors should never have allowed the column to be published. That they removed the column and apologised for it within hours of its publication is proof that the decision to include the column was irrefutably wrong.

It is clear that the column breached clauses 12(i) and 12(ii) of the Independent Press Standards Organisation’s Editors’ Code by making discriminatory comments about Jews and also mentioning the religion of the Jewish BBC presenters at all. We have called on the Independent Press Standards Organisation to require the Sunday Times to prominently print apologies in the next edition; investigate the editorial process that allowed this column to be printed in the first place; and recommend that Kevin Myers no longer be employed by any newspaper as a columnist or journalist.

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Ofcom shuts down Iman FM radio station for broadcasting 25 hours of lectures by Al-Qaeda leader including antisemitic hatred

The broadcasting regulator, the Office of Communications (Ofcom), has revoked the license of Sheffield radio station, Iman FM, for broadcasting antisemitic and hate-filled speeches by Anwar Al-Awlaki, the “widely known terrorist leader and Al Qaeda recruiter.”

The station was suspended earlier this month pending representations to Ofcom by the radio station, however the radio station’s arguments that it should be allowed to continue to operate did not sway the regulator. In its revocation notice, Ofcom wrote: “On balance, after considering all the relevant factors, it is Ofcom’s Decision that the contraventions of the [Broadcasting] Code and failures to comply with the [Broadcasting Act] Licence conditions in this case are so extremely serious, and that the Licensee’s conduct was so extremely reckless that we have no confidence that the Licensee would be capable of complying with its [Broadcasting Act] Licence conditions or that similar breaches would be prevented in the future. On this basis, in Ofcom’s view it is necessary in the public interest to revoke the [Broadcasting Act] Licence…”

In its 18-page revocation notice, Ofcom confirmed Iman FM admitted to Ofcom that they had broadcast 25 hours worth of lectures by Al-Awlaki. The radio station had claimed that it was “not aware of the background of the preacher and had no knowledge of him being proscribed by the United Nations,” adding that “had this fact been known” they would not have broadcast the lectures.

In one speech broadcast by Iman FM, Al-Awlaki said that “Our problem is not with [Jews’] ethnicity but their mindset.” In another antisemitic comment condemned by Ofcom, Al-Awlaki referred to a highly controversial event in Islamic history relating to the Prophet Muhammad’s alleged order to kill a Jewish opponent. He stated: “Ka’ab was a Jew but ethnically an Arab, so that shows that our negative attitude towards Jews is not based on racism, not based on their ethnicity, so that proves we are not antisemitic. Our problem is not with their ethnicity but their mindset…the issue of the Muslims is not the ethnicity of the Jews but their mindset which leads such a people to become blasphemous against Allah, to speak against the prophet, and to reject his message, to plot against Muslims, cause disunity. It is against their evil actions themselves.”

Ofcom found that this statement would have been interpreted as justifying a “negative attitude” and critical view towards Jewish people, based on what it termed as Jews’ “mindset” and their “evil actions”. Ofcom wrote: “We considered this statement would have been perceived by listeners as justifying hatred or violence towards Jewish people, and therefore is a clear example of hate speech as defined by the Code.”

Ofcom first began to investigate Iman FM after a listener complained that they had aired lectures encouraging violence and religious hatred during Ramadan. Al-Awlaki, who advocated violent jihad against the United States, was killed in a drone strike in Yemen, authorised by President Obama, but his writings and sermons remain available online.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Ofcom’s firm enforcement in this case,m which sends a strong message that the broadcasting of antisemitic hate speech will not be tolerated.

The radio station no longer appears to be broadcasting.

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German woman in Bournemouth reportedly tells daughter of Holocaust survivors “We cannot answer you, we are German and we cannot answer Jews”

A Jewish woman who is the daughter of Holocaust survivors was allegedly told by a woman to whom she had asked a question: “We cannot answer you. We are German and we cannot answer Jews.” The disturbing incident reportedly took place by the esplanade in Bournemouth.

According to the alleged victim, who was visiting Bournemouth from Stamford Hill in London, she was sitting with her daughter when she noticed three women approaching: a short woman aged approximately 80, and two tall younger women who looked very much alike. The alleged victim and her daughter asked whether the two younger women were twins. As they came near, the alleged victim asked: “Excuse me, but may I ask you something?” The oldest woman stopped and answered in a German accent: “We cannot answer you. We are German and we cannot answer Jews.”

The alleged victim said that the incident shocked her so much that she could not move initially. “Something has happened to me since.” She said that before she was trusting with strangers and smiled easily, but now she expects hostility. She initially received support from Stamford Hill Shomrim, which then referred the case to Campaign Against Antisemitism.

This incident has been reported to the police. We are following developments closely.

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Witnesses sought after man allegedly shouts abuse and directs Nazi salutes at Jewish girl on bus in London

Shomrim North West London has appealed for witnesses after a man allegedly shouted antisemitic abuse and directed Nazi salutes at a Jewish girl on a bus. The man, who is described as a short 50-year-old of Asian descent was reportedly wearing a light blue top and carrying bags containing flowers. The incident occurred yesterday evening on the number 13 bus, following which the suspect alighted at a stop on Finchley Road, near Temple Fortune.

Any witnesses should call the police on 101 or Shomrim North West London on 0300 999 1234.

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Ken Livingstone reportedly facing a new investigation by the Labour Party after his claims that “Hitler was supporting Zionism” only resulted in suspension

Ken Livingstone, the former Mayor of London, is reportedly facing a new disciplinary investigation by the Labour Party over comments he has made since he was suspended from the Party for claiming that Hitler supported Zionism.

According to the JC, Labour sources have confirmed to them “that another probe into the former Mayor of London “is under way”. It is said to centre on claims against Mr Livingstone since he was first suspended from the party in June 2016 and also his failure to show any remorse.” According to the report a leading lawyer has been appointed to make an initial assessment of the new allegations, which are believed to relate to Mr Livingstone’s statements since his suspension.

The Labour Party’s failure to expel Ken Livingston for his repeated claims that “Hitler was supporting Zionism” was the Party’s final act of brazen, painful betrayal.

We are monitoring these latest developments closely.

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Haringey Council adopts International Definition of Antisemitism amid threats and heckling from “Labour Party members”

Haringey Council has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism amid threats and heckling from the public gallery. Council Leader Claire Kober, a Labour Party councillor, proposed a motion to adopt the definition, and the motion was seconded by Gail Engert of the Liberal Democrats, with the support of both parties. The motion appears to have been passed unanimously, however activists interrupted proceedings repeatedly by shouting from the public gallery, with one voice heard shouting: “We will see you at your Constituency Labour Party.” Labour Councillor Joe Goldberg tweeted that he was threatened by fellow Labour Party members.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the fact that the motion was carried with cross-party cooperation, and commends those who proposed it. Nevertheless, it is concerning that local members of Labour’s Momentum faction organised a lobbying event on the specious basis that the definition supposedly suppresses criticism of the State of Israel and stifles support for Palestinians. As we have repeatedly pointed out, the definition clearly states that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic”, a point which was also made during the debate at Haringey Council.

It has also been reported that a number of Labour councillors were excused from voting after they indicated they would refuse to back the motion.

We commend the councillors who proposed and supported this motion. The opposition to the motion took the form of a menacing rabble and we call on the Labour Party in particular to discipline any of its members who took part in heckling and threats. Regrettably we hold out little hope that they will take any action at all.

The debate follows the publication on Sunday by Campaign Against Antisemitism of expert legal guidance on the definition which finds that “The Definition is a clear, meaningful and workable definition” which “should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate.”

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App maker removes antisemitic dilemmas from reasoning game after complaint from CAA

The makers of a popular frivolous reasoning game, “Will you press the button?”, have removed antisemitic content from their app following a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism was contacted by a member of the public who had been playing the game with her son, when an antisemitic question popped up. The game invites players to consider whether they would accept something negative happening if something positive were also to happen, for example asking whether you would “press the button” to “gain the powers of your favourite superhero”, even if doing so would also mean that “the hero’s entire rogues gallery will hunt you down until they are defeated”.

The game is generally silly and good-natured, prompting players to consider various fanciful dilemmas. However, tucked amongst the mostly innocuous questions, the game also contained shocking antisemitic content, including asking whether players would “press the button” to “prevent the Holocaust from happening but [the downside is that] 6 million Jews survive”, or to “find undeniable proof that the Jews did 9/11 but [the downside is that] if you release it or tell anyone you’ll get assassinated by Mossad 5 minutes later”.

The questions had been answered in the affirmative by tens of thousands of players, many of whom may have been children.

Campaign Against Antisemitism contacted the app maker, which responded that the questions “were created by users before we had any moderation system” and have now been removed.

We are particularly concerned by antisemitism in computer games, especially those aimed at children. Anybody who comes across material of concern is encouraged to report it to investigations@antisemitism.uk. In this case we were pleased to have been able to have the antisemitic content removed within four hours.

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CAA publishes lawyers’ opinion endorsing the International Definition of Antisemitism, including for further adoption by public bodies

Campaign Against Antisemitism has today published the opinion of expert counsel on the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism. The definition, which was adopted by the British government in December, following campaigning by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Sir Eric Pickles and others, has become a vital tool in the fight against antisemitism.

David Wolfson QC and Jeremy Brier, who acted for Campaign Against Antisemitism pro bono, drew up the nine-page opinion which includes a detailed assessment of the definition itself, considers the application of the definition in difficult cases, and contains useful advice for politicians and public bodies (such as universities) which are considering using the definition.

The opinion finds that “The Definition is a clear, meaningful and workable definition” and that it “should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate.”

Since the government adopted the definition, we have seen disturbing efforts to attack its legitimacy by far-left elements within constituency branches of the Labour Party and the University and College Union. This opinion makes clear the baseless nature of such attacks.

We have now circulated the opinion to all universities, and we are writing to all MPs to draw it to their attention.

We are extremely grateful to David Wolfson QC and Jeremy Brier for providing this valuable tool which clearly sets out the legal position with regard to the definition.

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Demonstrators outside Israeli embassy in London fly Hizballah flag, snatch and burn Israeli flag, shouting “Allahu akbar”

A demonstration outside the Israeli embassy in London yesterday saw scenes reminiscent of extreme Islamist rallies in parts of the Middle East.

At the demonstration against the use of metal detectors to prevent terrorist attacks at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, supporters of Hizballah brazenly flew the antisemitic terrorist organisation’s flag, just a month after a large pro-Hizballah procession marched down some of London’s most iconic streets.

When a small group of pro-Israel demonstrators arrived, anti-Israel demonstrators grabbed their Israeli flag and set it alight, shouting “Allahu akbar” and stamping on it.

We will be bringing the incident to the attention of the Home Office.

On Wednesday, Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted formal complaints over the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” march through central London on 18th June. The complaints are based upon our review of evidence gathered by the volunteers of our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit and members of the public.

Whilst the British government has proscribed the “military wing” of Hizballah under the Terrorism Act 2000, the “political wing” is not proscribed, something that even Hizballah finds ridiculous. In October 2012, Hizballah Deputy Secretary-General, Naim Qassem, said: “We don’t have a military wing and a political one; we don’t have Hizballah on one hand and the resistance party on the other…Every element of Hizballah, from commanders to members as well as our various capabilities, are in the service of the resistance, and we have nothing but the resistance as a priority.” Hizballah’s Secretary-General, Hassan Nasrallah, who is the leader of any fictitious “wing” of Hizballah that the government may wish to imagine, said: “If Jews all gather in Israel, it will save us the trouble of going after them worldwide.”

We continue to campaign for Hizballah to be proscribed as a terrorist organisation in its entirety, and we are discussing our proposals with the government.

Last week, our National Antisemitic Crime Audit found that in 2016, antisemitic crime grew by 14.9% compared to 2015 (44.5% compared to 2014), but only half of police forces charged any of the antisemitic crimes reported to them. The failure to enforce is especially alarming due the ferocity of antisemitic crime: 1 in 10 crimes involved violence. The Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, responded by promising to review our recommendations and crack down on hate crime.

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CAA submits complaints about Al Quds Day to the Charity Commission and police

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted formal complaints over the pro-Hizballah “Al Quds Day” march through central London on 18th June. The complaints are based upon our review of evidence gathered by the volunteers of our Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit and members of the public.

We have asked the Charity Commission to open a statutory inquiry into the involvement of a registered charity in the organisation of the march, including the production of Hizballah flags and placards which stated “We are all Hizballah”.

Additionally, we have reported statements by Nazim Ali, a pharmacist who spoke using a portable public address system throughout the march and led chanting, to the Charity Commission and the Metropolitan Police Service. We allege that Mr Ali announced to the crowd: “It is the Zionists who give money to the Tory Party to kill people in high-rise blocks,” referring to the Grenfell Tower disaster. Other statements by Mr Ali that we have referred to the police included: “We are fed up of the Zionists, we are fed up of their rabbis, we are fed of their synagogues, we are fed up of their supporters” and a claim that “The Israel Intelligence Service is also known as ISIS, they are part of the same organisation…Zionists, ISIS are the same, only difference is the name.”

Whilst the British government has proscribed the “military wing” of Hizballah under the Terrorism Act 2000, the “political wing” is not proscribed, something that even Hizballah finds ridiculous. In October 2012, Hizballah Deputy Secretary-General, Naim Qassem, said: “We don’t have a military wing and a political one; we don’t have Hizballah on one hand and the resistance party on the other…Every element of Hizballah, from commanders to members as well as our various capabilities, are in the service of the resistance, and we have nothing but the resistance as a priority.” Hizballah’s Secretary-General, Hassan Nasrallah, who is the leader of any fictitious “wing” of Hizballah that the government may wish to imagine, said: “If Jews all gather in Israel, it will save us the trouble of going after them worldwide.”

We continue to campaign for Hizballah to be proscribed as a terrorist organisation in its entirety, and we are discussing our proposals with the government.

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ISIS supporters reportedly call on jihadis to attack British synagogues and kosher shops and delis following terrorist attack in Jerusalem

The Sun has reported that ISIS supporters called on jihadis to attack Jewish worshippers at British synagogues during the Jewish Sabbath last Saturday. The call followed the temporary closure of the al-Aqsa Mosque and locking down of the area by Israeli security forces following themurder of two Israeli police officers in a terrorist attack in the Old City of Jerusalem. The paper cites research carried out by the Washington-based think tank, the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI), which reportedly uncovered disturbing antisemitic posts on Telegram, an encrypted chat service.

The posts allegedly called for the “Apes” to be prevented from “attending their places of disbelief” followed by the hashtags #synagogues, #schools and #shops. There was then a link to a Wikipedia list of British synagogues. The links were reportedly posted on the a pro-ISIS Telegram group.

Further on in the group conversation, a blood-spattered Israeli flag was allegedly posted along with a poem reading: “The sun will shine red between Gaza and Rafa, The moon will blacken over the peak at Mt. Hermon, Flowers are dead and girls become slaves, Loads of soldiers will return to town as corpses.” According to The Sun, this was followed by a list of kosher shops and delis around the UK, in London, Birmingham, Gateshead, Bristol, Edinburgh and Glasgow.

In February, ISIS terrorists used Telegram to call on their supporters to terrorise Jewish communities in the West, singling out the UK.

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Police investigate after family seemingly dress as Adolf Hitler, Eva Braun and Jewish children at Orange Order affiliated fancy dress party in Scotland

The Herald Scotland has brought to light that a man and women seemingly dressed as Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun won a fancy dress competition at a Hallowe’en party organised by a flute band at the Airdrie and District Orange Hall and Social Club in Scotland in 2013. Two children at the party allegedly wore clothes branded with the yellow Star of David that Jews were forced to wear by the Nazis. A shocking group photo has emerged of the man giving the Nazi salute, standing with the woman and children.

Police Scotland confirmed to the Herald Scotland that “it was investigating the incident to determine whether a hate crime had been committed.”

Highly-offensive photos from the annual Halloween parties held in the Airdrie and District Orange Hall and Social Club in 2010 and 2013 were reportedly reposted on a public Facebook page designed to promote the activities of the Orange Order. The Herald Scotland published some of these photos which have since been deleted from Facebook.

The Herald Scotland reported that “the Orange Order has ignored calls to condemn a flute band behind a fancy dress party.” In a statement, however, the Grand Orange Lodge of Scotland said that it “does not seek immunity from media criticism” but newspapers have a responsibility to be “impartial or even-handed.” It continued: “We understand that the press has a role to play, but there is a difference between holding to account and pursuing a baseless agenda to attack and demonise our Protestant culture and heritage.”

Ephraim Borowski, Director of the Scottish Council of Jewish Communities, ScoJeC, told the paper that “The meticulously-planned industrialised murder of six million people solely on the grounds of their ethnicity is not a joke, and neither is anything that glorifies those who planned it. Racism, including racism against Jewish people — antisemitism — must always be condemned in the strongest terms, and we would urge the Orange Order to do so.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is monitoring developments closely and we are pleased that Police Scottish are taking this matter seriously.

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Gang of three allegedly verbally abuses orthodox Jewish man and throws off his traditional hat in north-east London

A Jewish man’s religious fur hat was allegedly thrown off in an antisemitic attack in north-east London. According to Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, the incident took place on Saturday morning between 00:15 and 00:20 in Amhurst Park in Hackney.

The alleged victim, a recognisably Jewish man, was crossing Stamford Hill from Clapton Common (near Boots chemist) towards Amhurst Park during the Jewish Sabbath. As he reached the centre crossing island, three suspects approximately 15-17 years old, crossed into the centre of the road. They allegedly started swearing at him and tried to scare him in a completely unprovoked attack. The victim continued to cross the road into Amhurst Park and just before the bus stop, one of the youths ran up behind him and chucked off his fur hat of the kind traditionally worn by some charedi (orthodox) Jews.

Stamford Hill Shomrim is assisting the victim. We are following this case with interest.

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CPS responds to CAA research by pointing out that it is prosecuting plenty of hate crime, just not antisemitic hate crime

The Crown Prosecution Service has bizarrely attempted to defend its extremely poor record on prosecuting antisemitic hate crime by pointing out that it is prosecuting more hate crime than ever before, just not antisemitic hate crimes.

In response to Campaign Against Antisemitism’s National Antisemitic Crime Audit research, which was released today, the Crown Prosecution Service issued a statement saying: “Last year we prosecuted more hate crimes than ever before – more than 15,000 cases. We do not recognise the statistics contained in this report. Religiously-aggravated hate crimes display an ugly element of society which can be devastating to victims who have been targeted because of their beliefs. We will always prosecute crimes against people of all faiths where there is sufficient evidence and it is in the public interest to do so.”

The statement fails to address the crux of our criticism of the Crown Prosecution Service, which is that last year they prosecuted a paltry 20 known cases of antisemitism, and only 12 the year before. Admitting that they prosecute many thousands of hate crimes every year, but have yet to prosecute more than 20 antisemitic crimes merely proves the validity of our criticism.

Our research revealed, the parlous state of law enforcement against antisemitism, with hate crime targeting Jews surging by 44.5% in the past two years, but charging of antisemitic crime plummeting by 35.5%, whilst only 15 and 12 known cases were prosecuted in 2016 and 2015 respectively.

The research and our press effort was the work of volunteers. If you would like to support our work, please do volunteer or donate.

We are encouraging our supporters to read more about the report, or watch our short explanatory video, and then write to their MP.

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New report by CAA shows that antisemitic crime surged 44% in the last two years, but charging and prosecution dropped to only 20 prosecutions last year

New figures obtained from all UK police forces by Campaign Against Antisemitism for its National Antisemitic Crime Audit show that hate crime targeting Jews has escalated for the third year running, reaching the worst level on record.

  • Antisemitic hate crime has surged 44% since 2014, making 2016 the worst year on record
  • 1 in 10 antisemitic crimes were violent but only one violent antisemitic crime was prosecuted in 2016
  • Almost half of police forces did not charge a single one of the antisemitic crimes reported to them
  • Only 1.9% of antisemitic crime was prosecuted — just 20 cases last year
  • The Home Secretary has issued a statement promising to “consider the report’s recommendations carefully”

In 2016, antisemitic crime rose by 14.9% against 2015, or 44.5% against 2014. There were 1,078 antisemitic crimes in 2016 and a consistently elevated level of antisemitic crime has become the new normality for British Jews.

Police forces recorded 105 violent antisemitic crimes in 2016, meaning that on average, 1 in 10 antisemitic crimes involved an act of violence against a Jewish member of the public. Violent antisemitic crime continued to disproportionately affect smaller Jewish communities outside London and Manchester, as it has in past years.

Despite promises to crack down on antisemitic crime, the number of antisemitic crimes charged in 2016 decreased drastically, again. 2016 saw the number of antisemitic crimes charged plummet by 30.5% compared to 2015, or 35.5% against 2014, when antisemitic crime began to surge. In 2016, only 89 antisemitic crimes resulted in charges being brought meaning that only 8.3% of hate crimes against Jews resulted in charges. Astonishingly, 48.9% of the police forces which received reports of antisemitic crime did not charge a single one of them.

A paltry 20 cases of antisemitic crime were prosecuted in 2016, of which only 2 were violent crimes. In 2015, 12 antisemitic crimes were prosecuted, only 3 of which involved violence. There is no prosecution data for 2014.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has recently resorted to privately prosecuting antisemites itself, and in March won a landmark judicial review against the Crown Prosecution Service over its decision not to charge a neo-Nazi.

Antisemitic crime appears to be worsening in the initial months of 2017, with incidents including the firebombing of kosher restaurants in Manchester, a man stopped by police in London after brandishing a meat cleaver and machete whilst chasing after Jews, and police closing down London’s iconic shopping streets to make way for a major pro-Hizballah march.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has had to repeat its recommendations from last year’s report this year because, despite many promises, they have not been implemented by law enforcement bodies. The recommendations are simple and include basic measures such as producing specific training and guidance on antisemitic hate crime for officers and prosecutors, instructing Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary to review all police forces’ responses to antisemitic crime, appointing a senior officer in each force with responsibility for overseeing the response to antisemitic hate crime, and requiring the Crown Prosecution Service to record and regularly publish details of cases involving antisemitism and their outcomes, as police forces are already required to do.

In a statement, the Rt Hon. Amber Rudd MP, Home Secretary, responded to the report, saying: “Hate crime of any type is not acceptable. Everyone in this country has the right to be safe from violence and persecution. We are working together to tackle antisemitic hate crime in all its forms and using the full force of the law to protect every person in the UK. Our Hate Crime Action Plan has encouraged further action against hate crime across the police and criminal justice system. This includes encouraging more victims to report incidents to the police. We will consider the report’s recommendations carefully as we develop new ways to rid the country of this sickening crime.”

In the foreword to the report, Gideon Falter, Chairman of Campaign Against Antisemitism, commented: “2016 was the worst year on record for antisemitic crime, yet instead of protecting British Jews, the authorities prosecuted merely fifteen cases of antisemitic hate crime, including one solitary violent crime. The failure of police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service to protect British Jews is a betrayal. The solutions are simple, but whilst the right promises are being made, little has been implemented. The result is that British Jews continue to endure intolerable levels of hate crime. Britain has the political will to fight antisemitism and strong laws with which to do it, but those responsible for tackling the rapidly growing racist targeting of British Jews are failing to enforce the law. There is a very real danger of Jewish citizens emigrating, as has happened elsewhere in Europe unless there is radical change.”

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Lloyd Russell-Moyle, Labour MP for Kemptown, reportedly defends Melanie Melvin’s claim that “Israeli lobby” faked Syrian sarin gas attack

The Argus, based in Brighton and Hove, in East Sussex, has revealed that newly-elected Labour MP for Kemptown, Lloyd Russell-Moyle, has allegedly called for Labour activist Melanie Melvin to be reinstated to the Labour Party despite her claim that the BBC faked footage of a Syrian gas attack at the behest of the “Israeli lobby”.

On 7th April, a tweet on Ms Melvin’s account suggested that the Israelis were part of a conspiracy to fake a nerve gas attach by the Assad regime. She allegedly tweeted: “Breaking: Sarin gassing was filmed by the BBC at Pinewood on the orders of Mrs May and the Israeli lobby.” The tweet appears to have been deleted.

According to a report in the JC at the time, “Labour has confirmed that an activist who sent anti-Israel and anti-Jewish tweets is no longer a member of the Party.” It added: “However, a spokesperson for South East Labour Party declined to comment on whether she had been expelled or suspended.” The Argus suggests that Ms Melvin was subsequently suspended.

The Argus revealed that Brighton and Hove city councillor, Caroline Penn, told the paper that “she felt lied to by Kemptown MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle after the MP told her over Twitter he was “not appealing” on behalf of a Labour Party activist.” But in a leaked letter from Mr Russell-Moyle to the General Secretary of the Labour Party, seen by The Argus, the MP says he “recommends” the member’s reinstatement, concluding: “I do hope her record and her apologies will be enough to…allow her to return to membership.”

Councillor Penn told the paper that she was “furious” to learn of the content of the letter, written a week before the Twitter exchange with Mr Russell-Moyle in which she accused him of “defending the indefensible.”

The Argus alleged that “Following a conversation with Ms Melvin, Mr Russell-Moyle wrote to Labour Party General Secretary Iain McNicol on June 30 to say her tweet seemed ‘unhinged at best’ but had, he believed, been made as a parody of online conspiracy theorists. He said her behaviour showed ‘naivety but no malicious intent’ and said, as a ‘stalwart of the campaign’ who has apologised, the member should be reinstated.”

Ivor Caplin, the former MP for Hove, told The Argus: “I can’t see how anyone could say she should continue to be a member of the Labour Party. We have to take firm and decisive action on this issue.” He said there was “ample evidence” that the tweet by Ms Melvin breached the International Definition of Antisemitism.

According to the paper, Mr Russell-Moyle told Councillor Penn via Twitter that he had “reported” the conversation with Ms Melvin to the Party, writing: “I’ve a duty to relay a genuine conversation…She will have to appeal herself. I’m not appealing on anyone’s behalf.”

Yesterday he told The Argus: “I’m not appealing on her behalf. My understanding is there was an appeal going in and I was asked for evidence on her behalf. I was asked what my opinion was. She had assured me she was trying to show how stupid those views were. Based on that conversation I believe she’d been suitably apologetic.” He added that if further evidence came to light that Ms Melvin held antisemitic views, that there “should be no place her her [sic]” in the Labour Party. He said he would be “more than happy” to apologise to Councillor Penn “if she feels betrayed.”

The only problem with this excuse is that the tweet about Sarin gas was not Ms Melvin’s only problematic tweet. On 2nd February, responding to a post calling for action against the “bullying” of Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott, Melvin allegedly tweeted that “maybe she could claim Jewish ancestry. Then there’d be action.” She also claimed that allegations of antisemitism in the Party “weaken us all” and were “unfounded smears.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes Councillor Penn and Mr Caplin’s intervention. We will continue to monitor this case closely.

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Ofcom suspends Iman FM radio station for broadcasting 25 hours of lectures by Al-Qaeda leader including antisemitic hatred

The broadcasting regulator, the Office of Communications (Ofcom), has suspended Sheffield radio station, Iman FM, for broadcasting antisemitic and hate-filled speeches by Anwar Al-Awlaki, the “widely known terrorist leader and Al Qaeda recruiter.”

In one speech broadcast by Iman FM, Al-Awlaki said that “Our problem is not with [Jews’] ethnicity but their mindset.”

According to Ofcom’s breach decision posted online: “Overall Ofcom considered the breaches in this case to be extremely serious and has today issued a Notice under section 111B Broadcasting Act 1990 suspending the Licence.” According to the suspension notice, Iman FM has 21 days to provide an explanation for the broadcast before the station is shut down.

Iman FM confirmed to Ofcom that they had broadcast 25 hours worth of lectures by Al-Awlaki, claiming that they were “not aware of the background of the preacher and had no knowledge of him being proscribed by the United Nations.” They added that “had this fact been known” they would not have broadcast the lectures and accepted the material breached the Broadcasting Code.

Ofcom began to investigate Iman FM after a listener complained that they had aired lectures encouraging violence and religious hatred during Ramadan. Al-Awlaki, who advocated violent jihad against the United States, was killed in a drone strike in Yemen, authorised by President Obama, but his writings and sermons remain available online.

In one antisemitic lecture condemned by Ofcom, Al-Awlaki referred to a highly controversial event in Islamic history relating to the Prophet Muhammad’s alleged order to kill a Jewish opponent. He stated: “Ka’ab was a Jew but ethnically an Arab, so that shows that our negative attitude towards Jews is not based on racism, not based on their ethnicity, so that proves we are not antisemitic. Our problem is not with their ethnicity but their mindset…the issue of the Muslims is not the ethnicity of the Jews but their mindset which leads such a people to become blasphemous against Allah, to speak against the prophet, and to reject his message, to plot against Muslims, cause disunity. It is against their evil actions themselves.”

Ofcom found that this statement would have been interpreted as justifying a “negative attitude” and critical view towards Jewish people, based on what it termed as Jews’ “mindset” and their “evil actions”. Ofcom wrote: “We considered this statement would have been perceived by listeners as justifying hatred or violence towards Jewish people, and therefore is a clear example of hate speech as defined by the Code.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the finding from Ofcom and the strong message that it sends that the broadcasting of antisemitic hate speech will not be tolerated.

Justice, justice, you shall pursue - צדק צדק תרדף
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