Campaign Against Antisemitism today held the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism national rally in Parliament Square. Stewards put the final attendance number at 3,200 people.

The rally called for Jews and non-Jews alike to stand together against antisemitism at a time when the Jewish community has been shaken by antisemitism in public life and mounting hate crime.

Speakers included barrister and television personality Robert Rinder, actress and writer Tracy Ann Oberman, and historian, biographer and broadcaster Tom Holland, as well as Trupti Patel, President of the Hindu Forum of Britain and Fiyaz Mughal OBE, founder of Muslims Against Antisemitism.

The crowd heard powerful messages from the speakers.

Robert Rinder said that attendance at the rally was vital: “The question is not how I could be here, it’s how we could not be here today.” His sentiment was echoed by Fiyaz Mughal OBE, who said: “Britain is not Britain without Jews.”

Tracy Ann Oberman decried the state of antisemitism in Britain, warning: “Rabbis beaten up in the streets, people abused on the Tube, Nazi tropes at Glastonbury, antisemitic murals approved by politicians, Holocaust denial. How did it come to this?…It has never been more important for us all to stand up to racism.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Today we here in this square stand before the Mother of Parliaments in the country of the Magna Carta. The country that stood alone as a light in Europe as the hatred of Nazi Germany enveloped the continent. We stand here to say that Britain is better than this. We stand here to ask all of the people of our country to stand with us.”

In the latest of a spate of similar incidents, a group of men entered the Satmar Synagogue premises in Stamford Hill and threw a religious Jew’s hat to the ground.

The incident took place at 20:30 on 5th December at the Clapton Common synagogue of the Satmar community and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Anyone with further information should contact Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: ref 4635138/19.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

https://twitter.com/Shomrim/status/1202936426297466882

A reception at Buckingham Palace meant to celebrate Jewish life in the UK was organised without publicity for fear that, a week prior to a general election in which antisemitism has been a significant issue, it risked being misrepresented as a political statement.

The reception, organised by Clarence House and months in the making, included leaders of the Jewish community and, unusually, national media were not invited to cover the event.

Without casting blame on the Palace, it is gravely disappointing that British society has come to a point where celebrating Jewish life and the contribution of the Jewish community to the UK risks being seen as a partisan statement. Labour’s institutional antisemitism has not only corrupted that once fiercely anti-racist Party but has had a noticeable, detrimental effect on wider society as well.

A Clarence House spokesman said: “The Prince of Wales has a long history of supporting minority communities in the UK and around the world. This particular event was planned in the spring to celebrate the contributions made by members of the Jewish community to all aspects of British life.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

New video has emerged of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn embracing the The firebrand Islamic cleric, Sheikh Raed Salah, after Sheikh Salah was found by the Court of Appeal to have promoted the antisemitic blood libel that Jews bake bread using the blood of non-Jewish children.

Sheikh Salah, who was recently convicted in a court in Israel for incitement to terrorism, is best known in the UK as an object of Mr Corbyn’s warm praise. Sheikh Salah is a prolific antisemite who claims that Israel planned 9/11. Yet Mr Corbyn has said that “Salah’s is a voice that must be heard” and publicly told Sheikh Salah: “I look forward to giving you tea on the terrace because you deserve it!”

Mr Corbyn is also thought to have been the author of an article in the Morning Star in 2011 protesting Sheikh Salah’s arrest. The article also said: “It’s time that Western governments stood up to the Zionist lobby which seems to conflate criticism of Israel with antisemitism.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

An SNP official tasked with investigating an SNP candidate recently suspended by the Party over antisemitism has herself been forced to resign after she described israel as a “Nazi state”.

Denise Findlay has resigned from the SNP’s Conduct Committee after it was revealed that she had written on social media: “Israel with its treatment of Palestinians and latest apartheid laws is Nazi. It is not anti-Semitic to call Israel a Nazi state.”

Her tweets date from the summer of 2018, when the Labour Party was debating whether to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, which includes “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” as an example of antisemitism. She tweeted at least five times describing Israel as a Nazi state, sometimes in explicit criticism of the International Definition.

The Conduct Committee is due to investigate candidate Neale Hanvey, who also fell afoul of the International Definition of Antisemitism by comparing Israel to Nazis and was recently dropped by the SNP, although he will still appear on the ballot in Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath.

Ms Findlay reportedly urged SNP voters to continue to back Mr Findlay in Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath after he was suspended by the Party, and it is being reported that other local SNP members and volunteers are also continuing to back him, despite calls from Party leader Nicola Sturgeon not to do so.

Ms Findlay had been elected to the Conduct Committee in October reportedly promising to “protect members from spurious complaints brought by our opponents of the media [sic]”, with the support of Joanna Cherry QC, a prominent SNP MP, who tweeted at the time: “#Vote #DeniseFinlay1 Conduct Committee.”

In a statement, the SNP said: “There is no place for antisemitism in Scotland or in the SNP. All political parties have a duty to show leadership, and we will always take tough action in order to reassure the Jewish community that these matters are taken seriously. When challenged on her actions, Denise Findlay resigned from the SNP. The views she expressed are entirely at odds with the ethos of this Party.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A swastika and messages comparing the Prime Minister to Hitler were scrawled on a campaign board in Golders Green.

The offensive messages were graffitied onto material promoting the local Conservative candidate outside a Jewish home.

The incident was reported by Shomrim North West London, a Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol.

It is understood that this followed a separate, similar incident, which was also reported to police.

Barnet Council reportedly dispatched a team to both locations to remove the graffiti.

A Spokesperson for Shomrim North West London said: “It is incidents like these which bring the issue of antisemitism into sharp focus. This is the second incident reported to Shomrim in the last week of antisemitic graffiti daubed in Golders Green. Shomrim are committed to supporting victims of all hate crime. We urge any victims of Antisemitism to come forward and we will support you in reporting these incidents to police, and provide you with the necessary support.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Five youths singled out two Jewish men and threw their hats to the ground in two separate incidents.

The incidents took place at 16:30 on 4th December on Dunsmere Road in Stamford Hill and were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Anyone with further information should contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5193 4/12/19.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is shocked by reports that the police will not treat an attack on three Jewish children on a bus in Stamford Hill as an antisemitic hate crime.

The three visibly Jewish children are believed to have been the only passengers attacked during the incident, which took place on a bus in Clapton Common.

CCTV footage has been captured showing two men running for the number 253 bus, with one slipping at the back door, appearing to attack Jewish passengers, before some passengers begin to exit the bus.

The victims had their hats thrown off and one was punched in the eye.

The incident took place at around 08:15 on the morning of 24th November and was reported by Shomrim Stamford Hill, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5111 24/11/19.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 noted that law enforcement against antisemitic hate crime must be consistent and firm, and that in our experience, procedures and oversight within police forces fail to ensure that each and every response to antisemitism is as firm as the law permits. Among the recommendations was that police forces should implement a positive arrest strategy so that decisions not to take further action in hate crime cases are reviewed by senior officers under the ultimate supervision of a relevant Single Point of Contact, which all forces should appoint.

The French National Assembly, the lower house of Parliament, has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes this decision at a time of heightened antisemitism in France.

The French Parliament’s action follows President Emmanuel Macron’s call earlier this year for France to adopt the International Definition.

The motion proposed by Sylvain Maillard, from President Macron’s La République En Marche centrist party, passed by 154-72 votes.

The resolution stated: “For some years now, France, the whole of Europe, but also almost all Western democracies are facing a rise in antisemitism.” It continued: “Anti-Zionist acts can at times hide antisemitic realities. Hate toward Israel due to its perception as a Jewish collective is akin to hatred toward the entire Jewish community.”

The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. France joins a growing list of countries to use the International Definition, including Greece, which recently announced that it would adopted it.

The University of Bristol has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism, following a controversial debate.

The University had reportedly initially declined to adopt the full roster of examples that are appended to the International Definition, with the senate removing the examples and elevating the amended version to the trustees. However, following a protest by the Jewish Society, the International Definition has been adopted in full by the University.

THe University has had its share of scandals, dropping a complaint against one lecturer, Dr Rebecca Gould, over an article in which she claimed that “privileging the Holocaust as the central event in Jewish history” should end and that “the Holocaust persists and its primary victims are the Palestinian people”; and rebuffing Jewish students’ concerns over a lecture course titled “Harms of the Powerful”, in which a conspiracy theorist sociology professor, David Miller, suggested that the “Zionist movement” is one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims (redolent of the five pillars of Islam) and is bankrolled by “ultra Zionist funders”.

University College London adopted the International Definition recently, following a call on universities to adopt the International Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government.

An academic described as a ‘leading campaigner against racism’ has resigned from a Church of England advisory body in protest at the intervention of the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, in support of the Chief Rabbi’s editorial warning that Jeremy Corbyn is “unfit for office” and that “the very soul of our nation is at stake,” as antisemitic crime and antisemitism in public life reach record levels.

The Archbishop issued a statement following the publication of the Chief Rabbi’s article warning that there is a “deep sense of insecurity and fear felt by many British Jews.” Stating that “None of us can afford to be complacent,” the Archbishop made a thinly veiled attack on those who continually deplore antisemitism whilst doing nothing against it, writing: “Voicing words that commit to a stand against antisemitism requires a corresponding effort in visible action.”

However, Gus John has now resigned his role on the advisory body saying: “As a matter of principle, I cannot continue to work with the Anglican church … after the Archbishop of Canterbury’s disgraceful endorsement of the Chief Rabbi’s unjust condemnation of Jeremy Corbyn and the entire Labour party,” adding that the Chief Rabbi’s criticisms were received “as if he were the pope, speaking for all British Jews as the pope would for all Roman Catholics. Secular Jews and those who do not hold with the views of Jews for Labour are considered not to matter.” Mr John proceeded to note issues of discrimination against minorities within the Church.

It is regrettable that Mr John sees combating antisemitism as somehow mutually exclusive with fighting for equal rights for all minorities.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

A woman who was roundly condemned for vandalising the Warsaw Ghetto to advance her political opinions about Israel is now campaigning for the Labour Party.

Activist Ewa Jasiewicz sprayed political “Free Gaza and Palestine” on the walls of the Warsaw Ghetto in 2010, the largest and most well-known of the ghettos designated by the Nazis in German-controlled territory, from which hundreds of thousands of Jews were sent to death camps or killed by shooting and another hundred thousand died of starvation and courageous revolt. Essentially a mass grave, the Warsaw Ghetto serves as a salient symbol of the Holocaust for all and evokes sensitivity and strong emotion on the part of Jews in particular.

The vandalism of the Warsaw Ghetto was condemned across the Jewish community. That the political messaging of the graffiti was directed toward Israel meant it also clearly breached the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, which illustrates manifestations of antisemitism, inter alia, as

  • drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis – which the political messaging did by using the setting of the Warsaw Ghetto, which was established, operated and liquidated by the Nazis, to criticise Israeli policy and imply that it replicates that of the Nazis; and
  • holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel – which Ms Jasiewicz did by deliberately targeting a site of Jewish suffering to draw the attention of Jews to the policies of Israel and to associate Jewish suffering with those policies in the minds of the rest of the world.

Ms Jasiewicz is also a union organiser with Unite and has spoken at an event with the pro-Corbyn pressure group, Momentum.

It is unlikely to come as a surprise to many observers that the Labour Party under its antisemitic leader, Jeremy Corbyn, attracts support from individuals such as Ms Jasiewicz.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Tony Woodhouse, the chairman of Len McCluskey’s Unite union and an important ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, left a pejorative comment on the Facebook page of former Labour minister Ivan Lewis.

Mr Woodhouse confirmed that the comment had come from his account but denied responsibility, insisting that his social media account had been hacked. Mr Woodhouse has apologised to Mr Lewis.

Mr Lewis, who is an independent candidate in the general election, described the comment as antisemitic and demanded an investigation.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is submitting a complaint to the Unite union further to this incident.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Channel 4 is reporting that it has seen evidence showing that, contrary to assertions by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, the Party’s enhanced disciplinary processes were not expected to be implemented until after the general election.

Mr Corbyn told the BBC’s Andrew Neil in a car crash interview last week that he had “strengthened processes” since then and that “during the last few months” he had “proposed that egregious cases should be fast-tracked”.

However, Channel 4 has reported that an internal Labour Party document showing that in as late as mid-October a senior Party source did not expect the policy to be implemented until after the election.

Requests by Channel 4 for proof from Labour of the new processes having been introduced already were apparently initially ignored, but eventually Labour replied, insisting that the fast-track expulsion policy was now in force and that “a number of people have been expelled under those new powers” this month. As evidence, the Party pointed to remarks by the Party’s General Secretary, Jennie Formby, in the Jewish News over the weekend, which came after Mr Corbyn’s interview and the publication of Channel 4’s original article.

Channel 4’s conclusion: “Mr Corbyn claims to have ‘strengthened processes’, but the evidence we’ve seen casts doubt on whether the new policy has actually taken effect.”

A twenty-year-old man from Chigwell has been jailed admitting to harassing and stalking Jewish women because of their religion, and for religiously aggravated robbery of a Jewish man.

Sam Hemmati is reported to have bombarded numerous Jewish victims with antisemitic messages on several social media platforms, and to have stalked and harassed eight women between September 2018 and March 2019.

The messages included references to the Holocaust and sexually explicit material, and he repeatedly contacted the women despite requests to stop.

Mr Hemmati had also pleaded guilty to religiously aggravated robbery of a Jewish man in London in July.

He was sentenced at Wood Green Crown Court on 28th November to three years in prison for all the offences.

Inspector Jason Scrivener, from the Eastern Region Special Operations Unit, said: “The nature of Hemmati’s online communications can only be described as vile. He took pleasure in hounding his innocent victims using online channels, subjecting them to the most horrendous vitriol about their religion. This case highlights how seriously the police takes religiously motivated offences and I am pleased that he will now have a long spell behind bars to reflect on his actions.”

The Labour Party has released an advertisement for the general election that presents a montage of images accompanied by a speech by the Shadow Minister Dawn Butler as the narration.

In the narration, almost every conceivable minority is mentioned, including religious minorities by reference to those who “wear a hijab, turban, cross”. All of the groups mentioned are, the viewer is told, “worthy of equality”, “dignity” and “respect”. Ms Butler’s narration also says that each has “a future” and that “a Labour government will value you”. But the narration conspicuously does not mention Jews, nor are there any images of Jews.

The slogan of the advertisement is “Our diversity is our strength”. Ms Butler is the Shadow Women and Equalities Secretary.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It either did not occur to the Labour Party to include the Jews in this diversity advert, even though the Party is being investigated for institutional antisemitism, or the Jews have deliberately been excluded. Both explanations are appalling, and neither does anything to change the impression that the Labour Party is ‘for the many not the Jew’. In fact, it increasingly appears that the Party has grown comfortable with its anti-Jewish animus.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

A Conservative candidate suggested that a Jewish journalist, Melanie Phillips, may have dual loyalty to Israel in a past social media post.

In June 2013, Richard Short, now a Tory candidate, agreed with another Twitter used commenting on Ms Phillips’ appearance on an episode of BBC’s Question Time that “her allegiance is greater to Israel”, adding himself: “She almost has to declare an interest.”

Mr Short has apologised, saying: “I apologise unreservedly for this Tweet of 6 years ago. I admit I was ignorant of the offence that could be caused by what I said regarding Melanie Phillips, but I realise how inappropriate it was, it was wrong and I fully apologise.”

A spokesperson from Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The charge of dual loyalty and disloyalty is among the most widely held antisemitic slurs and must be condemned in the strongest terms possible. Under the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, “Accusing Jewish citizens of being more loyal to Israel, or to the alleged priorities of Jews worldwide, than to the interests of their own nations” is antisemitic. We expect the Conservative Party to take immediate action.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The SNP has dropped its candidate for a key target seat over allegations of antisemitism.

The Party has withdrawn its support for Neale Hanvey, a former councillor who is running in Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath, saying he had been suspended pending disciplinary action.

The allegations reportedly relate to a social media post in which Mr Hanvey compared Israel’s policies to the treatment of Jews in WWII, which would appear to be a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, according to which “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism. Another post Mr Hanvey had shared on Facebook in 2016 included an image of the Jewish billionaire George Soros as a puppet master controlling world leaders.

Mr Hanvey issued a apology, recognising how at least one of his comments breached the International Definition and saying that he was “genuinely and deeply sorry”

The SNP said: “Neale Hanvey is no longer an SNP candidate, and his membership has been suspended pending disciplinary action. All support for his campaign has been withdrawn.”

Mr Hanvey is the second candidate to have been dropped by Scottish parties this week over antisemitism.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Labour Party general election candidate has told a Jewish audience that her Party does not deserve their vote because it had “totally failed” to tackle antisemitism.

Carolann Davidson made the admission at the Jewish hustings in Glasgow’s East Renfrewshire, which is the constituency with the highest proportion of Jewish voters in Scotland.

Ms Davidson said that the party had “failed from the leadership down” and declared: “I can’t stand here and ask for your vote.” Saying she was “embarrassed by the way Labour is handling antisemitism”, she said that given she is “not here asking for your vote”, the reason she had attended was because “I want to reassure you as a community that there are still people within the Labour party who are not willing to surrender the party that was once the strongest ally of the Jewish community to racists and conspiracy theorists,” and to tell the community that “I [am] on your side,” adding: “I can’t defend the indefensible. What I can do is tell you who I am and what I stand for.”

In the past week, Scottish Labour dropped one of its candidates, Safia Ali, over allegations of antisemitism.

Meanwhile, in Ilford South in London, the Labour candidate, Sam Tarry, suggested that the antisemitism crisis was being exploited by those who disagreed with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn on foreign policy.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The Health Secretary, Matt Hancock, was heckled at a general election hustings for raising Labour’s institutional antisemitism in the debate.

The event, in his constituency of West Suffolk, elicited cries of “shame on you” and “racist” when Mr Hancock said that he was passionate about ridding antisemitism from our politics.

The audience’s outburst comes as Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Today, Campaign Against Antisemitism is releasing the results of our Antisemitism Barometer research, a multiyear study by Campaign Against Antisemitism which was designed and analysed by one of the foremost academics in his field from King’s College London. The study makes shocking findings about antisemitism in the Labour Party and British society, and how Jews are reacting.

The research has revealed that:

  • Antisemitism on the far-left has overtaken antisemitism on the far-right;
  • Jeremy Corbyn is now the candidate of choice for anti-Jewish racists;
  • Despite claims that Labour’s antisemitism stems from ‘a few bad apples’, two thirds of Jeremy Corbyn’s vanguard of strongest supporters hold at least one antisemitic view;
  • 84% of British Jews feel that Jeremy Corbyn is a threat specifically to the Jewish community;
  • Two in five British Jews have considered emigrating over antisemitism in the past two years alone, 85% of them because of antisemitism in politics, with two thirds expressly naming the Labour Party or Jeremy Corbyn as their reason;
  • Close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism, and a mere 35% of British Jews felt confident that antisemitic hate crimes against them would be prosecuted, a record low; and
  • Almost half of British Jews believe that the Crown Prosecution Service is doing too little to fight antisemitism.

In the report, Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on the Government to urgently implement a series of recommendations on law enforcement, and for all political parties to adopt our manifesto for fighting antisemitism.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Far from being the champion of anti-racism that it holds itself out to be, the far-left is now home to even more anti-Jewish bigotry than the far-right. Nowhere is that more obvious than in the Labour Party, whose Jeremy Corbyn is now the politician of choice for antisemites. If the battles of old against the far-right tell us anything, it is that if we fail to unite against this toxic hatred, it will spread to threaten other minorities too.

“People will find it utterly chilling that in 2019, large swathes of the Jewish community are considering the drastic step of leaving the country they love because they fear racism in our politics. I believe in the people of our deeply decent country and I hope that this study will encourage them to stop and think how they can show their Jewish countrymen that regardless of politics, race or religion we stand together against antisemitism, that the Jewish community is not alone.”

The full report is available at antisemitism.uk/barometer.

YouGov was commissioned to survey the British population’s attitudes towards Jews in 2018 and 2019. The YouGov survey was designed and analysed by Dr Daniel Allington of King’s College London. The polling was conducted prior to a General Election being called. Campaign Against Antisemitism also separately worked with partners to survey British Jews’ responses to antisemitism in 2018 and 2019. Dr Allington also designed and analysed the survey of the Jewish community, which was also conducted prior to a General Election being called. YouGov sample sizes for the survey of the British population were 1,606 in 2018 and 2,040 in 2019 (including boost samples from the ‘very left-wing’ and ‘very right-wing’ of 197 and 204 respectively). Campaign Against Antisemitism sample sizes for the surveys of British Jews were 2,103 in 2018 and 2,695 in 2019.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Jewish family in London has discovered a swastika and “Hail Boris” graffiti on their home. It is believed that the incident took place during the Jewish sabbath.

The swastika was one of the emblems of Nazi Germany and “Heil Hitler” was the salutation accompanying the Nazi salute.

The family called Shomrim North West London, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, which has reported the matter and arranged for the local council to remove the graffiti.

Anybody with information should call the police on 101 or Shomrim North West London on 0300 999 1234.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A senior rabbi has flown straight to Israel after teenagers in London beat him severely and left him bleeding on the ground.

At approximately 21:45 on Friday, the rabbi was approached as he walked along Amhurst Park in Stamford Hill by two teenagers described as black and wearing dark hooded clothing. The teenagers allegedly shouted “Kill Jews” and “F*** Jews” and beat him, leaving him bleeding on the ground.

The victim is now flying out of the UK to Israel.

The incident took place during the Jewish Sabbath, when orthodox Jews do not use telephones and has now been reported to the police and Stamford Hill Shomrim, a volunteer Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol.

Anybody with information should call the police on 101, quoting reference number CAD6332/30/11/19, or call Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is an appalling attack on an innocent and eminent visitor to our country, and he will leave not only with physical injuries but an impression of the UK that sadly our country is beginning to deserve, as attacks on Jews proliferate and antisemitism appears daily on the frontline of our politics.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Jewish filmmaker from Hertfordshire who has become increasingly worried about the rise of antisemitism in the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership has received a swastika by post at his home address after tweeting criticism of the Labour leader.

On Friday, his partner was outside their house while the postman was carrying out his rounds. He handed her a bundle of post in which the antisemitic poison pen letter was included. It was a single sheet of paper with a swastika crudely drawn in the middle, delivered in a stamped envelope. The filmmaker ran his own company for several years from his home address, and believes that the perpetrator tracked him down via information held at Companies House as his Twitter handle and bio included the name of his company.

He was shocked on opening the letter but has told Campaign Against Antisemitism that he finds this sort of low level bullying “pathetic”. Rather than frightening him, the man is now more determined than ever to expose and call out antisemitism wherever he witnesses it, however his partner has been shaken and worried by the incident. He immediately reported the letter to the police and an investigation has commenced.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are assisting the victim and the police are investigating. This is hardly the first time that we have seen antisemitism in politics cross into criminality. The perpetrator must be brought to justice to send a strong message to those trying to intimidate anyone standing up to antisemitism in the Labour Party.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

In Thanet, Kent, swastikas were found drawn on the street, although the graffiti had been adapted in order to incorporate the lines into a different, non-offensive drawing. The graffiti appeared to make reference to the EDL, the acronym for the English Defence League.

On Finchley Road in North London, the word “Jews” was scrawled onto a bus stop at Golders Green Station on Finchley Road. This is apparently the third time this month that the graffiti has appeared there. The incident was reported by North West London Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD9514 19/11/19

Meanwhile, on Castlewood Road in Stamford Hill, a Jewish school van with visible Hebrew words was vandalised. The incident took place at 20:37 on 25th November and was captured by CCTV, according to Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

The suspect appeared to be driving a white Maserati with licence plate PO64 ASZ.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4900 26/11/19.

A police officer in Northamptonshire has been found to have committed gross misconduct for selling items from Auschwitz and Nazi memorabilia on eBay.

Police Constable Matthew Hart was revealed last year by the JC to have, together with a relative, Paula Hart, administered an eBay account by the name of ww2autographs, which sold memorabilia from Holocaust extermination camps. At the time, the police force said that “no wrongdoing had been identified”, but it since decided that PC Hart’s eBay activity “contravened his declared business interest”, and he was hauled before a discplinary panel.

The panel found no evidence of criminality nor any indication that the sales were motivated by any extremist ideology or Nazi sympathies. Instead, it concluded that PC Hart had “a genuine historical interest in this period of history.”

Nevertheless, it decided: “The officer has shown an extreme lack of judgement and insensitivity which is not fully acknowledged. He sought to justify his conduct at every step and offered a rationale which cannot be accepted by the panel…He manipulated the listings…with a view to frustrating eBay policy over a significant period of time. He was not open and transparent with his own force. There is a failure to embrace [his own] responsibility and a lack of recognition which troubles us going forward. We lack faith in his judgement and compliance with matters requiring openness and self-regulation in future.”

Although removing items from the death camps is illegal under Polish law, it is not illegal under English law, nor is there any suggestion that PC Hart was himself involved in removing the items.

PC Hart has a right of appeal.

Video has re-emerged of Jeremy Corbyn telling Press TV that the BBC is biased towards saying “Israel has a right to exist”.

The Labour leader, who was a backbench MP at the time, told the Iranian-backed station: “I think there is a bias [in the BBC] towards saying that Israel has a democracy in the Middle East, that Israel has a right to exist, Israel has its security concerns.”

Mr Corbyn also suggested that there was “a great deal of pressure on the BBC from the Israeli Government and the Israeli Embassy,” seemingly implying that the Jewish state wielded some significant influence over the BBC’s output.

Mr Corbyn is understood to have been paid up to £20,000 for his various appearances on Press TV, which was banned in the UK for its part in filming the detention and torture of an Iranian journalist.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The respected Rabbi Menachem Margolin has delivered a blistering attack on Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Rabbi Margolin, who is based in Belgium, is the founder and chairman of the Brussels-based European Jewish Association, a leading organisation in the community.

On Mr Corbyn, Rabbi Margolin told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “There is no nuance, no clever turn of phrase or election soundbite that can undo what is done by Jeremy Corbyn. His record of supporting terrorists who want nothing short of the destruction of the world’s only Jewish State, his sympathy with those who murder and maim women, children, the elderly – any civilian – as long as they are Jewish – is a matter of public record that no amount of spin or whitewashing can erase. This is his legacy. He must live with it, and the solid and justified judgement and abhorrence that comes with it from the vast majority of Jews, not just in the UK but in Europe too.”

Rabbi Margolin’s intervention comes following that of Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis, who declared that Mr Corbyn is “unfit for office”. The Chief Rabbi was supported by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, and the Senior Sefardi Rabbi, Joseph Dweck.

It also comes after a fringe anti-Zionist group, United European Jews, released a statement backing Mr Corbyn. A previous letter by this group was promoted by Jewish Voice for Labour, an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The firebrand Islamic cleric, Sheikh Raed Salah, has been convicted in a court in Israel for incitement to terrorism.

Sheikh Salah is best known in the UK as an object of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s warm praise. Sheikh Salah is a prolific antisemite who claims that Israel planned 9/11 and who has, according to the Court of Appeal, even promoted the antisemitic blood libel that Jews bake bread using the blood of non-Jewish children. Yet Mr Corbyn has said that “Salah’s is a voice that must be heard” and publicly told Sheikh Salah: “I look forward to giving you tea on the terrace because you deserve it!”

Mr Corbyn is also thought to have been the author of an article in the Morning Star in 2011 protesting Sheikh Salah’s arrest. The article also said: “It’s time that Western governments stood up to the Zionist lobby which seems to conflate criticism of Israel with antisemitism.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

It is being reported that the Scottish Labour Party has dumped its candidate in Falkirk over antisemitic social media posts.

Safia Ali will no longer represent Labour in the seat at the general election.

A Labour spokesperson said: “Safia Ali is no longer the Labour Party’s candidate for Falkirk. We have taken immediate action on this matter. We deeply regret Safia Ali was selected.”

Scottish Labour’s general secretary, Michael Sharpe, said: “I deeply regret the people of the Falkirk constituency will no longer have a Labour candidate to campaign and vote for on December 12. There is no place for antisemitism, or any form of racism and bigotry, in our party. That is why Labour is taking robust action to root it out of our movement and wider society. The Party has significantly strengthened our procedures, with swift suspensions, new processes for rapid expulsions and an education programme for members. While I cannot go into details about individual cases, I can confirm that the Party has acted immediately and decisively to remove this candidate.”

Ms Ali is the third Labour candidate to be withdrawn in connection with antisemitism, following Gideon Bull in Clacton, England, and Kate Ramsden in Gordon, Scotland.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Jewish passerby on Clapton Common in Stamford Hill was cursed at angrily by a man in an unprovoked attack.

The assailant also made hand gestures at the victim, including one signifying a gun.

The incident took place at 12:30pm on 26th November, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD31816 26/11/19

A Jewish mother was harassed while breastfeeding when a woman screamed at her “you f***ing Jews, breastfeeding and blogging up all the buses.” The victim was brought to tears by the unprovoked outburst.

The incident took place on 26th November on Mare Street in Hackney on the 254 bus from Royal London Hospital, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD6515 26/11/19

Jeremy Corbyn has refused to apologise to the Jewish community for the Labour Party’s institutional antisemitism and his role in it.

Mr Corbyn was interviewed by the BBC’s Andrew Neil last night in what was widely panned as a disastrous conversation for the Labour leader, a full third of which was spent discussing Labour’s antisemitism crisis and the Chief Rabbi’s unprecedented intervention of earlier this week.

The Labour leader stood by his outlandish claim that Labour’s processes were fit for purpose and that “every single case” had been investigated, despite evidence to the contrary.

In a notable slip, Mr Corbyn appeared to admit that the report on antisemitism in the Labour Party produced by Shami Chakrabarti was not independent, saying: “I made that very clear in the Chakrabarti Report which we did very early on…”.

The full transcript of the interview is available here.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The launch of Labour’s controversial Race and Faith manifesto today was mired with controversy, as Mr Corbyn shared a platform with Labour candidates with troubling records on anti-Jewish racism.

The event was delayed and already overshadowed by the Chief Rabbi’s unprecedented intervention criticising the Labour Party over its institutional antisemitism and the manifesto’s sinister pledge to reform the Equality and Human Rights Commission, which is currently investigating the Labour Party following a complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Those sharing the platform with Mr Corbyn today included Afzal Khan, an MP who reportedly compared Israeli policy to that of the Nazis; candidate Aspana Begum, who accused Tony Blair of spreading ‘Zionist propaganda’ and who claimed that the leaders of Saudia Arabia were ‘inspired by Zionist masters’; and Claudia Webbe, who defended Ken Livingstone’s comparison of a Jewish journalist to a concentration camp guard and who also heads up Labour’s disputes panel, which decides how to deal with members embroiled in antisemitic controversy.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Another day, another example of the institutional antisemitism of the Labour Party. Jeremy Corbyn today announced his Party’s race relations manifesto, which makes a sinister call for reforming the Equality and Human Rights Commission, the very body that is investigating the Labour Party over antisemitic racism following a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

“Meanwhile, those sharing the platform with Mr Corbyn are hardly paragons of anti-racism. Instead, their views are what the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn stands for. Jeremy Corbyn has now again assured the country that he does not tolerate antisemitism ‘whatsoever’, but he surrounds himself with it, and in the past has even perpetrated it himself. Jeremy Corbyn is gaslighting Britain’s Jews.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The Senior Rabbi of Britain’s Sephardi Jewish community has issued a statement fulsomely backing the Chief Rabbi over his unprecedented intervention, in which he warned that Jeremy Corbyn was “unfit for office” and that “the very soul of our nation is at stake.”

Rabbi Joseph Dweck wrote: “As a rule we as rabbis are careful to keep out of national politics. But as Chief Rabbi Mirvis said, this comes to an issue of racism and a large portion of the Jewish community does not look at the potential election of Corbyn as a question between liberal and conservative politics, but rather, the difference between the safety and peace of Jewish life in this country, and G-d forbid, the alternative.

“My community is the oldest in this country, dating back to 1656. We have over the last 364 years contributed greatly to every sector of British society, and in turn, Britain has been very good to our people. Given the history of antisemitism in Europe, the hateful spectre that casts a shadow over the rhetoric and ideas of Mr Corbyn and his party gives us significant reason for concern and so the Chief Rabbi has raised his voice in concern and caution. I stand with him and his message.”

Rabbi Dweck is one of the most respected voices in the British Jewish community, representing the Spanish and Portuguese Sephardi Jewish community which was the first to return to Britain following the expulsion of all Jews in 1290.

Earlier today the Archbishop of Canterbury also backed the Chief Rabbi.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The Archbishop of Canterbury has backed the Chief Rabbi over his unprecedented intervention, in which he warned that Jeremy Corbyn was “unfit for office” and that “the very soul of our nation is at stake.”

Archbishop Justin Welby, who is the most senior clergyman in the Church of England has this morning issued a statement warning that there is a “deep sense of insecurity and fear felt by many British Jews.”

Stating that “None of us can afford to be complacent”, the Archbishop made a thinly veiled attack on those who continually deplore antisemitism whilst doing nothing against it, writing: “Voicing words that commit to a stand against antisemitism requires a corresponding effort in visible action.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

In an unprecedented intervention, the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth, Ephraim Mirvis, has asked in The Times how far Jeremy Corbyn would have to go to be considered “unfit for office”, rhetorically asking readers: “What will the result of this election say about the moral compass of our country? When December 12 arrives, I ask every person to vote with their conscience. Be in no doubt, the very soul of our nation is at stake.”

Acknowledging that he had broken with precedent, he wrote: “Convention dictates that the Chief Rabbi stays well away from party politics — and rightly so. However, challenging racism is not a matter of politics, it goes well beyond that.”

Noting that “British Jews are gripped by anxiety”, he wrote that “the question I am now most frequently asked is: What will become of Jews and Judaism in Britain if the Labour Party forms the next government?”

Remarking on the past four years of Mr Corbyn’s leadership of the Labour Party, he wrote that the Jewish community had “been treated by many as an irritant, as opposed to a minority community with genuine concerns [about antisemitism in the Labour Party.”

He admonished politicians who “have sat silent” and wrote that “We have learned the hard way that speaking out means that we will be demonised by faceless social media trolls and accused of being partisan or acting in bad faith by those who still think of this as an orchestrated political smear. Yet, I ask myself: should the victims of racism be silenced by the fear of yet further vilification?”

The Chief Rabbi then exhorted British voters to examine their consciences before voting, pleading “with the heaviest of hearts, I call upon the citizens of our great country to study what has been unfolding before our very eyes.” Enumerating failures by the Labour Party to act, and listing some of Mr Corbyn’s own antisemitic acts, he concluded: “How far is too far? How complicit in prejudice would a leader of Her Majesty’s opposition have to be to be considered unfit for office? Would associations with those who have incited hatred against Jews be enough? Would describing as ‘friends’ those who endorse the murder of Jews be enough? It seems not. It is not my place to tell any person how they should vote. I regret being in this situation at all. I simply pose the question: What will the result of this election say about the moral compass of our country? When December 12 arrives, I ask every person to vote with their conscience. Be in no doubt, the very soul of our nation is at stake.”

The Chief Rabbi is the latest Jewish religious leader to break with convention and speak out on politics. In the past month, Rabbi Jonathan Romain called on his community to vote against Labour and Rabbi Yuval Keren told his community to vote tactically against Labour.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The Labour Party is due to launch its Race and Faith Manifesto tomorrow. The manifesto includes a pledge to “Enhance the powers and functions of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, making it truly independent, to ensure it can support people to effectively challenge any discrimination they may face.”

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “As a result of our legal representations, the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn became the first party to face a full statutory investigation since the Equality Act 2006 was brought into law.

“As the complainant in the investigation, we consider it to be sinister in the extreme that the Labour Party is now proposing to restructure the very body that is investigating its racism against Jews. The Commission is defending British Jews by independently acting to investigate and stop unlawful antisemitic discrimination, harassment and victimisation, just as it does for all other groups protected under the Equality Act, exactly as it was designed to do.

“This sinister proposal by the Labour Party to restructure the Commission should be immediately retracted. If the next government seeks to undermine the Commission’s ability to defend Britain’s Jews from antisemitism then there can be no doubt whatsoever that we will issue judicial review proceedings to prevent them from doing so.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Three Jewish children have been attacked on a bus in Clapton Common in Stamford Hill.

CCTV footage has been captured showing two men running for the number 253 bus, with one slipping at the back door, appearing to attack Jewish passengers, before some passengers begin to exit the bus.

The victims had their hats thrown off and one was punched in the eye.

The incident took place at around 08:15 on the morning of 24th November and was reported by Shomrim Stamford Hill, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5111 24/11/19.

The Brexit Party has not dropped its candidate for West Lancashire, despite revelations that he made antisemitic and other controversial comments on social media.

Marc Stanton is alleged to have written the problematic posts in 2014.

One read: “Having just watched the latest news about Gaza, I can’t say I am a fan of fanatical Islam – but I sure as hell am antisemitic now,” adding: “The situation between Palestine and Israel seems to continually get worse. Of course, I could not possibly express an opinion but one could perhaps understand why some people might feel that the Israelis learnt their lesson well 60 years ago about genocide and oppression. The student should not always follow the teachings of the professor.”

Mr Stanton reportedly responded to the reports, saying: “It has been brought to my attention that I have used some appalling language on my private Facebook page in the past. I regret wholeheartedly using such language and realize that it will have offended some people. For this, I apologise. The comments were made years ago, at the end of a tiring day, and on a private account. I made a mistake and condemn such language and all forms of bigotry….I have spent years as part of a mixed society of many different nationalities and religions and social types. I honestly believe that everyone is equal and that is what I have always strived to ensure in my daily life.

“My grandmother was Jewish and so being part Jewish myself, I find it strange that I am being accused of being antisemitic and Islamophobic at the same time. I have always endeavored to treat every one of whatever background equally. It would seem that some of my Facebook posts from several years ago have been taken out of context and in a selective manner for the purpose of trying to cause me a problem. I do object to radicalism and extremism from any religion or ideology.”

Other candidates revealed to have made such comments have been dumped by their respective parties, but disappointingly the Brexit Party does not appear to have taken any action against Mr Stanton.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The University of Warwick has backed a lecturer who dismissed concerns over Labour’s ongoing antisemitism crisis by saying such concerns are “an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

In a lecture on 11th November, Dr Goldie Osuri posited in a recording obtained by Campaign Against Antisemitism that “the next time they say that the Labour Party is antisemitic, you know there are some people possibly that are possibly antisemitic, but this idea that the Labour Party is antisemitic is very much an Israeli lobby kind of idea.”

Her conspiratorial comments, alluding to supposed outsized Israeli power and interference in British politics, and dismissal of antisemitism in Labour as a smear, left Jewish students outraged.

Rather than some shadowy conspiracy, Labour’s institutional antisemitism is very real. Indeed on 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Dr Osuri was challenged over her remarks by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society who said in a statement released jointly with the Union of Jewish Students, said that “there can be no excuse from an academic at such a prestigious university to spread conspiracy theories associated with classic antisemitism.” They went on to point out that Dr Onsuri’s comment  “belittles and diminishes the fears, experiences and concerns of the Jewish community and spreads the antisemitic conspiracy that Jews control the media”. 

In an email to students shown to Campaign Against Antisemitism, Dr Osuri doubled down on her claims, promoting the work of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, as well as bemoaning that she was “saddened” that “none of these issues were raised in the seminars.”

In a statement Angus Taylor, the President of the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society responded that, “Dr Osuri has sought to downplay and deny our community’s experience of racism by suggesting that it is in fact a conspiracy, and that the representative bodies of British Jews are in fact lying, making up racism against them.” He ended by saying that “Dr Osuri’s argument that the concerns of Jewish students in the lecture were not ‘raised in the seminars… in a respectful manner’ demonstrates a demonstrable lack of sensitivity to the experience of people affected by racism. Her comments upset students and this response amounts to victim-blaming.”

This case has been exacerbated by the response of Warwick University to questions from the Jewish News, in which the University repeated Dr Osuri’s claim that the accusations were a “misrepresentation of her lecture” that leaves out “significant context,” as well as sharing her demand that concerned students “discuss and debate.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism shares the Jewish students’ conclusion that the University has committed “a shameful dereliction of its responsibility to protect Jewish students” and that “the University has chosen to side with antisemites and not Jewish students.”

This incident follows other concerns over the University’s failure to address a scandal over a group chat which gained national attention, in which antisemitic, mysogynistic, abusive and threatening messages, including rape threats, were uncovered.   

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

A councillor with the Scottish National Party (SNP) has been suspended for three months reportedly for sharing an antisemitic article on social media.

Frank Anderson, on West Lothian Council, is reported to have been sanctioned for “disrespectful conduct” after an ethics hearing over his sharing of a blog called “Grouse Beater” in October 2018.

The article, which was apparently critical of Rhea Wolfson, a Jewish official with the GMB Scotland union, mentioned that Hitler had alleged that Jews had gradually assumed leadership of the trade union movement. Although the article did not reference that Ms Wolfson is Jewish, the panel was reportedly satisfied that it was antisemitic.

The article was written by Gareth Wardell, a member of the SNP. The Party suspended him after the article was published and then expelled him.

Mr Anderson apologised to Ms Wolfson in an email, and an apology was also published in the media.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The Liberal Democrats have dropped a general election candidate after it emerged that he had made controversial remarks on social media, including about Jews.

Waheed Rafiq was to represent the Lib Dems in Birmingham Hodge Hill, but has been dumped by the Party after it was revealed that he had posted on Facebook in 2010: “shocking to see how the Jewish government call them self Jews when they are wiping out all the people of Gaza.” 

In 2012, Mr Rafiq is said to have posted a cartoon of a hook-nosed Jew wearing a Star of David hat.

In 2014, he apparently called on his Facebook friends to boycott WhatsApp because it was “Zionist backed”, clarifying: “Please note Jeff Rothschild is the Vice President of Infrastructure software and thus also a share holder in Facebook.” He added: “There are other non Zionist apps such as the Telegram Messaging App. It’s available on both android and apple users created by two brothers in Berlin. It’s better encrypted, much safer and thus better than WhatsApp. Never forget WhatsApp is Zionist backed so all we do and say is monitored and can leave us vulnerable to be exploited later.”

Also in 2014, Mr Rafiq reportedly shared an image with a Star of David flag and the words “Genocide, Apartheid, Holocaust”.

Back in 2010, Mr Rafiq had stood as a general election candidate in the same constituency for UKIP.

According to Buzzfeed News, a Liberal Democrat spokesperson said: “At 3pm Waheed Rafiq Hodge Hill PPC was suspended from the party. The public posts on his Facebook and Twitter account from 2010 to 2014 are clearly and unambiguously antisemitic and bring the party into disrepute and are also of material disagreement with the fundamental values and objectives of the Party.”

Mr Rafiq acknowledged that he was the author of the controversial social media posts, and wrote: “I can confirm that those comments are mind [sic] and I honestly don’t see them as antisemitic because the public need to know the full story.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

It is being reported that Labour’s assistant mayor in Leicester, Mustafa Malik, has been suspended from the Party for sharing a controversial video on social media.

Cllr Malik, who is assistant mayor for jobs and skills, is being investigated by the Party for posting the video, which is titled “CNN, Goldman Sachs and the Zionist Matrix” and features the former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, the David Duke, who apparently speaks on the video about how banking and the media are influenced by Jews.

Cllr Malik reportedly shared the video in 2016, describing it as “an eye opener”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The Welsh party, Plaid Cymru, has suspended a member who featured in the Party’s election broadcast over allegations of historic antisemitism.

Sahar Al-Faifi is reported to have made antisemitic comments on social media, which Plaid Cymru will now reportedly investigate during her suspension.

Ms Al-Faifi issued an apologetic statement, admitting that “Several years ago I made a handful of social media posts that I regret deeply as they crossed the boundary of criticism of Israel into antisemitism.” The rest of the statement read in part: “I deleted the tweets more than five years ago, and issued an apology to Jewish organisations and others. I have also undertaken antisemitism training, both formally through the Board of Deputies and informally with Jewish colleagues in order to ensure that I never repeat the same mistakes.”

However, the Board of Deputies distanced itself from Ms Al-Faifi, saying: “We met Sahar Al-Faifi to confront her over concerns we had over antisemitic social media postings. Ms Al-Faifi apologised to us and made some amendments to her social media output. However, we were clear that the situation still remained unsatisfactory,” clarifying that it had asked her to amend some other of her previous social media posts but that she did not appear to have done so.

The Board of Deputies said that several troubling posts remained, including one apparently appearing to promote the genocidal antisemitic terrorist group, Hamas, and another reportedly suggesting that the London Bridge attack in 2017 was linked to “pro-Zionists”.

A spokesperson for Plaid Cymru said: “We have taken immediate action to suspend the person in question. We will investigate all allegations. Plaid Cymru will not tolerate anti-Semitism, racism or intolerance in any form. That includes the appalling abuse the individual has been subject to. It is not a part of the Wales we want to build.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Jewish man who was subject to antisemitic abuse, along with his family, on the London Underground, has spoken out about the ordeal.

On Friday a man hurled antisemitic abuse at a Jewish family, including children, on the tube. The incident was filmed by another commuter and two courageous individuals – one unseen man and one Muslim lady – eventually confronted the man.

The Jewish victim has made the following statement:

“On the morning of Friday 22nd November, my wife and I were sitting on the Tube travelling from Hendon Central to Covent Gardens minding our own business, discussing with our children our plans for the day.

“A man boarded the train after I did. As soon as he got on he came over and asked me if we were Jews. He shouted at me that the Jews started the slave trade and threatened that I, my wife and children were going to be his slaves and suffer various other ailments. He said the Jews were from the synagogue of Satan, and continued with vile antisemitic abuse which was very unsuitable for any child or adult to hear.

“I was confused. I was ready for the antisemitic comments after the Jewish question, but I was not prepared for the hail of antisemitic abuse which followed. The video only shows a short clip of fifteen- to twenty-minute ordeal.

“The only thing I could think about was the safety of my children and the best thing to do at that time was to restrain myself and try to get my children to ignore the situation. My wife and I tried to constantly reassure the children and distract them so they would not sense how anxious we actually were. We tried to remain calm and ignore the abuse, hoping this would keep our three young children calm.

“A man with a baseball cap bravely tried to intervene and he himself was subject to threats of violence. We are extremely grateful for the Muslim lady wearing the headscarf, who we now know as Asma, who stepped in. We are certain that without her intervention and distraction, he would have continued his abuse which could have escalated to physical violence. I would like to meet Asma in person to thank her.

“One cannot see on the short video that I politely asked him multiple times to step back and to stop directing abuse to my children. Afterwards, the gentleman filming very kindly switched seats with my son, and the lady who sat down next to me also helped distract our children by talking to them.

“The experience made me more vigilant on the journey home. My children were deeply worried and confused , but we are thankful that this incident only entailed verbal abuse and not worse. It is clear that antisemitism is still rife, it just happens that a small two minute snippet of this long episode was caught on camera.

“Shomrim North West London [a Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol group] have been supporting me and encouraged me to report this to Police, and to them I am very grateful.

“This Tube journey has left me with mixed feelings about society. On the one hand my wife, my children and I were subject to vile abuse in a full Tube carriage, however I am grateful for those who stood up for me.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Unbridled antisemitic hatred such as this has no place in our society, and the perpetrator should now feel the full force of the law. 

“CAA commends Asma Shuweikh and the unseen gentleman whose brave interventions serve as a timely reminder that British values of tolerance and respect are still alive and well. We also applaud the Police for making a swift arrest following the vital circulation of the video of the incident by commuter Chris Atkins.

“CAA has provided support to the victim, who has expressed the desire to meet Ms Shuweikh so that he can thank her in person.”

A Spokesperson for Shomrim North West London said: It is incidents like these which bring the issue of antisemitism into sharp focus. Shomrim are committed to supporting victims of racial hate crimes and antisemitic abuse. We urge any victims to come forward and we will support you in reporting these incidents to police, and provide you with the necessary support. We are very thankful to British Transport Police for taking swift action and a strong stance on investigating all forms of hate crime. Shomrim NW London applauds Asma and the gentleman who courteously confronted the abusive man and defended the Jewish family.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Muslim woman has bravely stood up to a man hurling antisemitic abuse at a Jewish family on a Northern Line Underground train in London on Friday. A suspect is now in police custody.

The incident was captured on video by a commuter, Chris Atkins, and uploaded to Twitter, where it has been viewed over 3.2 million times.

It shows a man, dressed in a hooded tracksuit top and a cap, reading from what may be a bible and gesturing at a Jewish father and his sons, who are wearing Jewish skullcaps called kippot. He tells them, “I will make them of the synagogue of Satan, which say they are Jewish, and are not, but do lie,” adding: “Behold, I will make them come and worship before your feet, and they will know that I have loved thee.”

The Jewish man can be seen calmly putting his arm around one of his sons and comforting him, saying: “just ignore him.”

An upstanding male passenger, whose face cannot be seen in the footage, confronted the abusive man, who responded by saying “I’m no Christian pastor” and threatens to punch him and telling him to: “F**k off.”

The Muslim woman, wearing a hijab, who, it has emerged, is called Asma Shuweikh, then bravely stood up for the Jewish family, telling the abusive man not to use such language in front of children. The man replied: “These people are impostors, they are trying to claim my heritage and then try and tell me that it’s cool and then they start the slave trade.”

The man continued ranting: “It’s not my opinion, it’s G-d’s word”, but Asma took issue with him again and tried to reason with him, distracting him from continuing his abuse of the Jewish family.

The man exited the train at Waterloo Station.

In a statement, Ms Shuweikh said that she was motivated to act by her own experiences of being attacked for her faith.

Mr Atkins said: “It was the children that really got me and everyone else, he was just screaming at these children. It was horrific in every sense.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Ms Shuweikh and the gentleman who courageously confronted the abusive man and defended the Jewish family, and Mr Atkins for filming the incident.

Following an appeal by British Transport Police, a suspect has been taken into custody. In a statement, British Transport Police said: “A man has been arrested in connection with an antisemitic incident on the London Underground. British Transport Police officers attended an address in Birmingham this evening, Saturday 23rd November. The man was arrested on suspicion of a racially aggravated section 5 public order offence. He remains in custody.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends the police on their swift response. The perpetrator must feel the full force of the law.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

UPDATE: a man has been arrested in Birmingham on suspicion of a racially aggravated offence in connection with this incident.

It has emerged that Jeremy Corbyn shared a platform in 2008 with a speaker who claimed that Zionism has made the Jews “immoral”, while another endorsed violent Jihad against Israelis.

The footage from a 2008 rally shows Mr Corbyn, then a backbench Labour MP, on a stage with Ismail Patel, the chair of Friends of Al-Aqsa, who said that Zionism had a “devastating effect on the Jewish community itself: it has made them immoral in justice.” Mr Corbyn was on the stage and appeared to embrace Mr Patel when the latter concluded his remarks.

Mr Corbyn has a long relationship with Friends of Al-Aqsa, which raised £10,000 for his first leadership campaign, although it subsequently emerged that most of that donation had not been declared by Mr Corbyn, in an apparent breach of Electoral Commission rules.

Mr Patel is also known to have defended the antisemitic genocidal terrorist group, Hamas, saying: “Hamas is not a terrorist organisation. The reason that they hate Hamas is because they refuse to be subjugated to be occupied by the Israeli state and we salute Hamas for standing up to Israel.” Mr Corbyn has infamously referred to Hamas as his “friends”.

Another speaker at the 2008 rally was the academic, Azzam Tamimi, who urged the people of Gaza to “explode in their faces” and engage in Jihad, in an apparent reference to vioment terrorism against Israelis. Mr Corbyn is seen at the side of the stage when these comments were made.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

It has emerged that two senior Labour figures — one a general election candidate and the other a member of Labour’s National Executive Committee (NEC) — were administrators of a Facebook group reportedly set up in order to assist Party members subject to internal disciplinary investigations, including over antisemitism.

One candidate involved in the Facebook group, which is called ‘Labour Party Compliance: Suspensions Expulsions Rejections Co-Op’, is Maria Carroll, Labour’s general election hopeful in Carmarthen East and Dinefwr in Wales. Although Ms Carroll claimed never to have seen any offensive material in the Facebook group, Welsh Labour reported her to the Labour Party, which subsequently decided that no investigation would take place as Ms Carroll did not make any antisemitic comments herself. Ms Carroll said that she would have “immediately condemned them” had she seen offensive comments.

Another administrator was Darren Williams, a member of Labour’s NEC, which oversees the Party’s disciplinary issues, including antisemitism.

Yet another figure involved in the group was Colin O’Driscoll, a co-chair of Labour International and a senior figure in the international wing of Momentum, the pro-Corbyn pressure group.

One member of the group was Alan Bull, who had shared a post on social media suggesting that the Holocaust was a hoax and other controversial material. However, it took the Labour compliance unit eight months to suspend Mr Bull in a saga that neatly illustrated Labour’s institutional antisemitism, as Mr Bull’s critics were hounded out of the Party. It is unclear whether Mr Bull’s membership of this Facebook group – and any advice he received as a member – contributed to the delay in his suspension.

This is hardly the first time the NEC has found itself embroiled in controversy over Holocacust issues. Claudia Webb, also a general election candidate for the Labour Party and the chair of the NEC’s disputes panel, which oversees the Party’s disciplinary processes, defended Ken Livingstone after he compared a Jewish journalist to a concentration camp guard and claimed that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is being “smeared” with “false allegations”. Ms Webb was appointed to her role after her predecessor, Christine Shawcroft, resigned from the role and then from the NEC entirely after a leaked email revealed she had sent an email backing a Party member who had been suspended over alleged Holocaust denial.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This is yet another episode illustrating Labour’s institutional antisemitism: two senior Labour figures are found to be associated with a Facebook group that helps Holocaust-denying members avoid the Party’s disciplinary processes. Those two individuals will not be investigated at all by the Party, and conveniently it transpires that one of them sits on Labour’s National Executive Committee, which oversees the Party’s investigatory and disciplinary processes. Plainly, Labour’s internal processes are not fit for purpose, regardless of what its leader and frontbenchers try to claim.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, has produced a guide for canvassers advising that they tell voters worried about antisemitism that “the party has done nothing wrong” and that “any Jew who leaves the UK after the election of a Labour Government will be making the mistake of a lifetime.”

The pamphlet, “Getting on the Front Foot about Antisemitism”, written by JVL co-founder and web officer, Richard Kuper, advises that “If you are dealing with people who try to use antisemitism allegations to bury Labour and Corbyn give them no quarter” and urges them “Don’t be apologetic” and “Go on to the offensive.”

In a section defending Jeremy Corbyn, it advises to respond that “Any Jew who leaves the UK after the election of a Labour government will be making the mistake of a lifetime – losing the chance of helping create a genuinely egalitarian, anti-racist society in which all people are valued equally for who they are, not their origins, their religion, their ethnicity or social class. Labour’s policies speak for all of us.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer has shown that 40% of British Jews have considered leaving the country due to antisemitism.

The guide concludes that “the party has done nothing wrong.” It states that “All the evidence shows there is less antisemitism in the Labour party than in other parties in the UK. Insofar as it was slow in tackling what antisemitic allegations there were, this has now been remedied.”

A spokesperson from Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Jewish Voice for Labour is an antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation. Its claim that concerns over Labour’s institutional antisemitism are an ‘irrational panic’, is absurd and offensive.

“Each day new evidence emerges of antisemitism at every level within the Party, yet JVL claims that ‘the Party has done nothing wrong’ and tells canvassers ‘don’t be apologetic’. They should ‘go on the offensive’ and deceive voters by saying that the fatal deficiencies in Labour’s disciplinary processes have ‘now been remedied’.

“JVL evidently feels compelled to produce these lies because ordinary people are concerned about racism in the Labour Party – as they should be. Labour under Jeremy Corbyn is being investigated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission following a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism because the evidence of its institutional antisemitism is overwhelming.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A Labour pressure group co-founded by Diane Abbott, the Shadow Home Secretary, is revealed to have opposed a ban on the antisemite Louis Farrakhan’s entry into the UK in 1986.

Mr Farrakhan, an extremist American hate preacher, had by that time already infamously called Judaism a “gutter religion” and had claimed that the Jews would face “God’s ovens” if they continued to oppose him, in a sick reference to the extermination camps of the Holocaust. Indeed he had also praised the Nazi leader, saying “Hitler was a very great man”.

Nevertheless, Labour Party Black Sections, a group co-founded by Ms Abbott in 1981, when she was serving as a councillor in Lewisham, opposed the ban imposed by the Home Secretary when Mr Farrakhan sought entry to the UK.

The revelation comes as Ms Abbott faces mounting opposition from the substantial Jewish community in her constituency of Hackney North and Stoke Newington over Labour antisemitism.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 58,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

A man screamed “Jews don’t belong here” at a Jewish couple on a bus and showed them his middle finger, before pulling the man by his hood and the woman by her shitel (a hair covering worn by observant Jewish women).

The incident took place today at 15:10 on the 254 bus in Hackney Central and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol. The couple were forced to leave the top floor of the bus and descend to the lower level.

The assailant was reportedly around 35 years old wearing black-framed sunglasses and dark clothing.

Anyone with further information should contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4258 21/11/19.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Roger Hallam, the co-founder of the activist group, Extinction Rebellion, has been disowned by his colleagues after he described the Holocaust as “just another f***ery in human history.”

Mr Hallam made the comment in an interview to the German newspaper, Die Zeit. He told the paper, “the extremity of a trauma can create a paralysis in actually learning the lessons from it. The fact of the matter is, millions of people have been killed in vicious circumstances on a regular basis throughout history, ” adding: “They went to the Congo in the late 19th century and decimated it,” before adding that contextually, the Holocaust was “almost a normal event … just another f***ery in human history.”

Mr Hallam claimed that his comments, which appeared to minimise and downplay the Nazis’ systematic murder of six millions Jews, were taken out of context: “I want to fully acknowledge the unimaginable suffering caused by the Nazi Holocaust that led to all of Europe saying ‘never again’. But it is happening again, on a far greater scale and in plain sight. The ‘global north’ is pumping lethal levels of CO2 into the atmosphere and simultaneously erecting ever greater barriers to immigration, turning whole regions of the world into death zones. That is the grim reality. We are allowing our governments to willingly, and in full knowledge of the science, engage in genocide of our young people and those in the ‘global south’ by refusing to take emergency action to reduce carbon emissions.”

In a post on Twitter, the German branch of Extinction Rebellion wrote: “We explicitly distant ourselves from Roger Hallam’s belittling and relativising statements about the Holocaust. In so doing he contravenes the principles of XR, which does not tolerate antisemitism, and he is no longer welcome in XR Germany.”

Extinction Rebellion UK, while denouncing the comments, are still deciding what action to take. The group said in a statement: “Jewish people and many others are deeply wounded by the comments today. Internal conversations have begun with the XR Conflict team about how to manage the conflict process that will address this issue. We stand by restorative outcomes as preferable, although in some cases exclusion is necessary.”

The Church of England has produced a landmark document urging Anglicans and other Christians not only to repent for the “sins of the past” towards their Jewish neighbours but to be alert to and actively challenge the continuation of such attitudes or stereotypes.

Campaign Against Antisemitism welcomes the release of this historic document which demonstrates the Church of England’s solidarity with the Jewish community at this worrying time.

The 121-page teaching document, which was three years in the making, was released today by the Church of England’s Faith and Order Commission.

Titled G-d’s Unfailing Word, it encourages Christians to rediscover the relationship of “unique significance” between the two faiths, worshipping one God, with scriptures shared in common. It makes clear that the Christian-Jewish relationship should be viewed as a “gift of G-d to the Church” to be received with care, respect and gratitude.

It also speaks to the attitudes towards Judaism over many centuries as providing a “fertile seed-bed for murderous antisemitism.”

Writing in the afterword of the document, Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mervis, described the relationship as a “profound friendship.” However, he said that he has a “substantial misgiving” with the document over its failure to address evangelism.

Last year, The Church of England adopted the full International Definition of Antisemitism.

A sixteen-year-old neo-Nazi teenager from Durham has been found guilty of preparation of terrorist acts between October 2017 and March 2019.

The teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, becomes the youngest person ever to be convicted in the UK for planning a terrorist attack.

Reportedly a follower of far-right ideology since the age of thirteen, the boy had hoped to follow in Adolf Hitler’s footsteps and listed numerous targets “worth attacking” with Molotov cocktails, including synagogues. He had also begun drafting a manifesto titled “A Manual for practical and sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike system in the Durham City area, Sieg Heil”. Other items seized from his home included a copy of Mein Kampf and material on explosives and firearms.

During the trial, the prosecution claimed that the defendant had become “an adherent of neo-Nazism – the most extreme of right-wing ideology”, noting that he had written in his diary on the occasion of Hitler’s birthday that the Nazi leader was “a brave man to say the least. Although maybe having written proof that I admire their number one enemy isn’t such a wise idea. I will however say that I one day hope to follow in his footsteps.”

Sentencing is expected to take place in January.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “A terrorist atrocity against Jews on British soil has been narrowly averted by the timely intervention of the police. It highlights the need for vigilance by the authorities in the face of rising far-right antisemitism. This young man must receive a sentence that will act as a deterrent to others who are tempted to follow his example.”

The Conservative Party has reportedly suspended, Amjad Bashir, their general election candidate for Leeds North East, who claimed that young British Jewish men were returning from Israel as “brainwashed extremists.”

Mr Bashir has been “suspended from the party pending investigation” and the Conservatives have withdrawn election support after it emerged that during a debate in the European Parliament in 2014, he said: “As far as brainwashing by the rabbis and the politicians are concerned, I can testify to that…young men are going over from England where I come from, people of the Jewish faith who my grandchildren have grown up with as decent people, decent young men. But have come back as extremists, as people that are brainwashed. They will not listen to reason. There is something very peculiar and wrong going on within Israel.”

At the time when Mr Bashir made the comment he was an MEP with UKIP, having defected from the Conservatives in 2012 and returned in 2015.

The incumbent MP in the constituency is Labour’s Fabian Hamilton. When Mr Bashir’s comments were reported, Dan Cohen, his election agent, said that that he would not continue to campaign for him, while a local Jewish constituent told Campaign Against Antisemitism that he felt that he had been “disenfranchised”.

Mr Bashir apologised for his remarks and said that he intended to meet local Jewish groups and travel to Israel “to gain direct experience from the situation on the ground there.”

While it is disappointing that it took a couple of days for Mr Bashir to be suspended, Campaign Against Antisemitism commends the Conservatives for their firm action in suspending him and sending a strong message that such comments are not tolerated in the Conservative Party.

This follows the decision by the Scottish Conservatives to suspend Ryan Houghton, the candidate for Aberdeen North, over social media posts questioning evidence of the Holocaust.

A panel has found a police officer guilty of gross misconduct after he dangled a pepperoni pizza over a colleague’s kosher food. The officer can keep his job but will receive a final written warning.

The notice of the disciplinary hearing stated that: “On 8th March 2019, knowing that another officer is Jewish, PS CJ062 Gary Jacobs deliberately dangled a pizza containing pepperoni over that officer’s food. A piece of pepperoni subsequently fell onto that officer’s food meaning they could not eat it [due to Jewish dietary practices prohibiting the consumption of meat from pigs].”

It is understood that the incident left the victim feeling “embarrassed”, “isolated” and “as if she was being mocked for her faith”.

Sergeant Jacobs, who is based in Crawley in West Sussex, appeared at the hearing at force headquarters in Lewes on Tuesday morning to answer allegations that his conduct amounted to a breach of the force’s Standards of Professional Behaviour in respect of equality and diversity.

Amy Clarke, for Sussex Police, said: “On any reading of this incident the conduct was utterly unacceptable and is much more serious than what might appear at first to be suggested by Sergeant Jacobs as a misguided attempt at humour. Sergeant Jacobs also knew she was Jewish and knew she maintained a kosher diet. Any modicum of common sense means you shouldn’t dangle pork over her food.” Ms Clarke added that it was not a “split second stupid decision” as Sergeant Jacobs had already been told about not contaminating the food.

Michael Salter, the chair of the panel, said: “This was an intentional act, it was deliberate, directed towards an individual and from an officer in a position of trust and responsibility,” adding that Sergeant Jacobs’ actions were “crass, insensitive and quite frankly stupid”.

Labour’s Harlow general election candidate was heckled at a hustings for defending Party leader Jeremy Corbyn’s relationship with the genocidal antisemitic group Hamas and other terrorists.

Laura McAlpine, who is fighting to unseat the Conservative MP in the marginal seat, described Mr Corbyn as “a man of peace”, and dismissed a questioner asking about Mr Corbyn’s relationship with Hamas and other terrorist groups by telling him to “do a little bit of reading and then come back to me.”

She insisted that the “Labour Party is an anti-racist Party” and has “robust procedures” to deal with antisemitism, a comment that was met with jeers.

Ms McAlpine also clearly had supporters in the audience.

Mr McAlpine also again defended her campaign chief, Brett Hawksbee, who was revealed to have written to colleagues that “the fear of many on the left is that the ideological successors of the bombers of the King David Hotel, the mass murderers who decimated Deir Yassin, would be quite happy to see a pogrom in Gaza and the West Bank, a Jewish final solution to the Palestine problem.” The comment, which clearly breached the International Definition of Antisemitism for drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis, was even criticised by a Labour Party official, but Ms McAlpine stood by Mr Hawksbee. Mr Hawksbee has been a vocal defender of Chris Williamson, the disgraced MP who resigned from the Labour Party after being told he could not stand as a candidate for the Party.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Video Credit: Your Harlow

At ITV’s general election debate yesterday, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was laughed at as he lied about his Party’s handling of its antisemitism crisis.

Asked about why Labour had become a “cesspit of antisemitism”, Mr Corbyn was met with ridicule from the audience as he insisted that antisemitism is “an absolute evil and scourge within our society”. He then appended his usual clarification that “racism in any form is a scourge in our society.”

The Labour leader then proceeded to claim: “I have taken action within my Party where anyone has committed any antisemitic acts or made any antisemitis statements. They are either suspended or expelled from the Party and we’ve investigated every single case. We do take this very very seriously indeed, because I do not want to live in a society where racism is rife. I understand and recognise the history – the desperate history – of the Jewish People in the twentieth century, which came about from an unrestriction [sic] of antisemitism in the 1920s. We’ve got to stand up against racism in any form in our society.”

However, despite Mr Corbyn’s absurd claim to the contrary, there in fact remain scores of cases, including some dating back years, that have not been dealt with at all, while numerous notorious cases have been processed slowly and reluctantly and in some cases the figures involved have remained within the Party or have only been removed due to public pressure. Indeed Mr Corbyn himself has yet to be disciplined for his own record of antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s monitoring of antisemitism in the Labour Party led to the Equality and Human Rights Commission launching a full statutory investigation on 28th May following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant. Our research has shown that cases such as that of Corby ally Peter Willsman are stalled and that Mr Corbyn’s office has repeatedly interfered in the disciplinary process.

Nevertheless, Mr Corbyn’s claim was defended today by Labour frontbencher Dawn Butler.

During the debate, Mr Corbyn was also asked about convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, and at one point referred to the late Mr Epstein as ‘ep-shtein’, in what some considered to be an attempt to emphasise his Jewishness.

A spokesman for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “To our nation’s shame, we have been exposed to the spectacle of an antisemitic leader lying on television to millions about his Party’s record on dealing with antisemitism, while busily filling his Party’s top spots and coveted seats with those who will perpetuate antisemitism for another generation to come. In this dire situation for Jews, we call on all decent British people to stand together with us against antisemitism.

“Jeremy Corbyn’s risible attempt to deceive viewers about his handling of Labour’s antisemitism crisis was compounded by his bizarre and inconsistent pronunciation of the Jewish surname of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, referring to him at one point as ‘ep-shtein’. Mr Corbyn’s abhorrent record on Jews certainly raises questions as to whether the Labour leader was attempting to underscore Mr Epstein’s Jewishness.”

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Mr Corbyn’s comments on antisemitism can be viewed below from 26:14.

The Scottish Conservative Party has reportedly suspended Ryan Houghton, their general election candidate for Aberdeen North, over social media posts questioning evidence of the Holocaust. Mr Houghton remains on the ballot because his nomination papers are already submitted but he no longer represents the Conservative Party, which has withdrawn support for him.

In a post on a martial arts forum seven years ago, Mr Houghton wrote under the username, Razgriz, that there was “no credible evidence to suggest the Holocaust did not happen” but revealed that “I do find some of the events fabricated, and exegarated [sic] in some cases.” He continued: “As history is written by the victors there is always going to be a bit of re-writing.” He also praised the “interesting” research of the antisemitic Holocaust-denier, David Irving. However, in a later post he said that he was “not defending David’s Irving’s views” and that he does not agree with “some of the stuff he says.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is an example of antisemitism.

Mr Houghton is also accused of having made homophobic and anti-Muslim statements online. In a statement, he said: “I apologise unreservedly for any hurt now caused by these comments and have been in contact with members of the Jewish community in Aberdeen.” Mr Houghton also said that he was a member of the Holocaust Education Trust (HET), had visited Auschwitz-Birkenau and has “never held antisemitic or intolerant views.”

A spokesman for the Scottish Conservatives said: “The comments contained in these blogs are unacceptable and Mr Houghton has been suspended as a member of the Scottish Conservative party as a result. The party has also withdrawn its support for his candidacy in Aberdeen North. The Scottish Conservatives deplore all forms of Islamophobia, homophobia and antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends the Scottish Conservatives for their firm and swift action in suspending Mr Houghton and sending a strong message that antisemitism in political parties will not be tolerated.

A number of actors and academics have endorsed a disgraceful letter describing Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn as “a life-long committed anti-racist” who “is being smeared as an antisemite by people who should know better.”

While conceding that antisemitism is present within society and all political parties, including Labour, the signatories insist that “no political party or political leader has done more to address this problem than Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party,” and outrageously claim that “Labour’s political opponents and much of the media have trivialised and weaponised this issue for ideological ends.”

The signatories include various familiar controversialists such as academics Noam Chomsky, Naomi Klein and Yanis Varoufakis; actors Mark Ruffalo, Mark Rylance and Steve Coogan; playwright Caryl Churchill; designer Vivienne Westwood; and musicians Brian Eno and Roger Waters. Some of the signatories have made second careers out of baiting Jews.

The letter follows a previous letter by a group of prominent, respected figures calling out Labour antisemitism and showing solidarity with Britain’s Jewish community.

Meanwhile, former Labour member Eddie Marsan, said of Mr Corbyn that “you are either antisemitic or you are ignorant”, declaring that, after voting for Labour since 1987, he would no longer do so, and would be launching an initiative for the Liberal Democrats.

Campaign Against Antisemitism rejects the disgraceful assertion that Labour’s institutional antisemitism has been “trivialised” or “weaponised”, not least given that the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has launched a full statutory investigation into the Labour Party. We are further troubled by the sinister suggestion that Mr Corbyn’s antisemitism is a “smear” propagated by “people who should know better”, a pitiful attempt to hide behind innuendo.

The EHRC launched its full statutory investigation on 28th May following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Jo Swinson, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, has published a video in which she signs and endorses the International Definition of Antisemitism and encourages her fellow Liberal Democrats to do the same.

Ms Swinson said of the International Definition that it is the “most widely recognised and accepted definition of anti-Jewish racism here in Britain,” and anticipated that “by using this Definition, it helps us to understand, identify and tackle antisemitism.”

She added: “I know that many Jews are worried about the outcome of this election, and by signing this Definition today and encouraging our candidates to do the same, I hope to reassure you that Liberal Democrats understand the threat and the fears that you are facing.”

In 2016, the British Government became the first in the world to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, and numerous other states and domestic and international bodies have followed, most recently Greece.

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Dan Greef, the Labour Party candidate for South Cambridgeshire, reportedly posted on Facebook in 2010: “Had a great day out at a concentration camp,” and claimed that he had voted for the British National Party (BNP).

In 2013 Mr Greef also reportedly commended disgraced former Liberal Democrat MP for Bradford East, David Ward, for publishing a blog post ahead of Holocaust Memorial Day that attempted to draw equivalence between Israel and the Nazis. He wrote: “Good man David Ward. Remembering only part of History condemns us to repeat it, however Israeli policy is not the same as Judaism!”

Mr Greef also apparently wrote, “Is it right that many of our MPs are also members of different ‘Friends of Israel’ pressure groups? Discuss,” as well as, “Bloody Israel, I sometimes want to rip it all up!”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism, as is “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination”, which is the implication of wishing to “rip up Israel”.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Devon and Cornwall Police have won “highly commended” recognition at the World Class Policing Awards for their response to the arson attack on the historic Exeter Synagogue. This new event recognises outstanding police work from across the world.

The attack occurred on 21st July 2018. Devon Live reported that police attended immediately, reviewed CCTV images, and arrested Tristan Morgan.

As he was put in a police van, he reportedly said: “Please tell me that synagogue is burning to the ground, if not, it’s poor preparation.”

According to police, Mr Morgan is alleged to have poured “an accelerant” into the synagogue, which was built in 1763, making it one of Britain’s oldest synagogues, and then tried to light it.

He was later sentenced to an indefinite hospital order and a ten-year terrorism reporting order.

The citation stated: “In July 2018 Exeter Synagogue was the target of an arson attack that was captured on CCTV. Within minutes a local man was arrested. CID officers, working with counter-terrorism colleagues went ‘above and beyond’, neighbourhood and diversity staff provided exceptional victim care and, brought together by police, local faith and civic partners gave outstanding support to the Jewish community. The suspect, who held extreme white supremacist views was later sentenced to an indefinite hospital order and a ten-year terrorism reporting order.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Devon and Cornwall Police for their swift and strong response and support given to the local Jewish community. This will serve as an example to police forces throughout the UK.

Image credit: Exeter Synagogue

A video has emerged of the Labour Party’s candidate for St Ives in Cornwall, Alana Bates, playing a song “From the river to the sea” with her band, The Tribunes.

One verse in the song goes: “From the [Jordan] river to the [Mediterranean] sea, Palestine will be free,” which is a common and unsubtle call for the destruction of the Jewish State and is thus an attempt to deny the Jews, uniquely, the right to self-determination.

The song also includes the lyrics: “Israel is a racist state, Israel is an apartheid state.”

Ms Bates, a bass player and backing singer in the band, conceded that the song was written by the group but denied that it has any antisemitic meaning in a bizarre clarification in which she said: “I obviously support Israel’s right to exist. The song says that Israel is a racist state. I would personally say that the government policies of Israel are racist.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is an example of antisemitism.

Ms Bates, who is also a councillor on Penzance Town Council, also confirmed that the Labour Party had ordered her to remove the song from her social media.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Ed Murphy, the Labour Party general election candidate for North West Cambridgeshire, has reportedly been deselected by the Party after it emerged that he accused the Israel Defence Forces of being “international pirates” secretly backed by the Conservatives on Peterborough City Council.

Mr Murphy, who is a councillor on Peterborough City Council, reportedly deleted a tweet from July 2014 in which he alleged that the Israel Defence Forces were backed by the Conservatives on the council, apparently posting: “Israel a terrorist state? And Israeli military (secretly backed by the Cons on Pboro Council) are international pirates.”

The tweet is said to have been accompanied by the image of the Israeli flag turned into a symbol of piracy, and Mr Murphy is alleged to have shared the image on Twitter twice more in 2015 with the hashtag #MilitaryStatePirates.

It has also been claimed that Mr Murphy, who was then Labour’s leader on the council, proposed Alan Bull as a candidate in a Peterborough City Council election, despite knowing that Mr Bull had shared a post on social media suggesting that the Holocaust was a hoax and other controversial material.

However, it took the Labour compliance unit eight months to suspend Mr Bull in a saga that neatly illustrated Labour’s institutional antisemitism, as Mr Bull’s critics were hounded out of the Party.

Labour confirmed the “difficult” decision to withdraw Mr Murphy’s candidacy had been made on Wednesday night but did not provide a reason for the move.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

The Labour Party has vehemently rejected criticism from the 24 public figures who denounced Jeremy Corbyn and Labour over antisemitism and accused several of them of antisemitism, Islamophobia and misogyny.

Twenty-four non-Jewish authors, actors, television and radio presenters, human rights campaigners and technologists wrote to The Guardian denouncing Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party over antisemitism.

A Labour Party spokesperson responded to the letter saying: “It’s extraordinary that several of those who have signed this letter have themselves been accused of antisemitism, Islamophobia and misogyny. It’s less surprising that a number are Conservatives and Lib Dems.”

They added: “We take allegations of antisemitism extremely seriously, we are taking robust action and we are absolutely committed to rooting it out of our party and wider society.”

The signatories included Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales; actors and actresses Joanna Lumley OBE, Simon Callow CBE; authors David Cornwell (who writes as John le Carré), Fay Weldon CBE, Frederick Forsyth CBE, William Boyd CBE, Tony Parsons, Sathnam Sanghera, and Ed Husain; historians Tom Holland, Sir Antony Beevor and Peter Frankopan; television presenters Dan Snow MBE, Nick Hewer, Dan Jones, Janina Ramirez, and Suzannah Lipscomb; radio presenter Maajid Nawaz; producer Terry Jervis; journalist Oz Katerji and human rights campaigners Trevor Phillips OBE, Fiyaz Mughal OBE, and Ghanem Nuseibeh.

Noting that the Party is now under statutory investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission following legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant, the public figures said that Jews were in “anguish” and being ignored.

They wrote: “We listen to our Jewish friends and see how their pain has been relegated as an issue, pushed aside by arguments about Britain’s European future…now, it seems, is not the time for Jewish anxiety.”

However they warned: “But antisemitism is central to a wider debate about the kind of country we want to be. To ignore it because Brexit looms larger is to declare that anti-Jewish prejudice is a price worth paying for a Labour government. Which other community’s concerns are disposable in this way? Who would be next? Opposition to racism cannot include surrender in the fight against antisemitism…The path to a more tolerant society must encompass Britain’s Jews with unwavering solidarity. We endorse no party. However, we cannot in all conscience urge others to support a political party we ourselves will not.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is deeply grateful to each of them for their solidarity with the Jewish community.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Twenty-four non-Jewish authors, actors, television and radio presenters, human rights campaigners and technologists have written to The Guardian denouncing Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party over antisemitism.

Noting that the Party is now under statutory investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission following legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant, the public figures said that Jews were in “anguish” and being ignored.

They wrote: “We listen to our Jewish friends and see how their pain has been relegated as an issue, pushed aside by arguments about Britain’s European future…now, it seems, is not the time for Jewish anxiety.”

However they warned: “But antisemitism is central to a wider debate about the kind of country we want to be. To ignore it because Brexit looms larger is to declare that anti-Jewish prejudice is a price worth paying for a Labour government. Which other community’s concerns are disposable in this way? Who would be next? Opposition to racism cannot include surrender in the fight against antisemitism…The path to a more tolerant society must encompass Britain’s Jews with unwavering solidarity. We endorse no party. However, we cannot in all conscience urge others to support a political party we ourselves will not.”

The signatories include Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales; actors and actresses Joanna Lumley OBE and Simon Callow CBE; authors David Cornwell (who writes as John le Carré), Fay Weldon CBE, Frederick Forsyth CBE, William Boyd CBE, Tony Parsons, Sathnam Sanghera, and Ed Husain; historians Tom Holland, Sir Antony Beevor and Peter Frankopan; television presenters Dan Snow MBE, Nick Hewer, Dan Jones, Janina Ramirez, and Suzannah Lipscomb; radio presenter Maajid Nawaz; producer Terry Jervis; journalist Oz Katerji and human rights campaigners Trevor Phillips OBE, Fiyaz Mughal OBE, and Ghanem Nuseibeh.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is deeply grateful to each of them for their solidarity with the Jewish community.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 8th December, regardless of religion, race or politics, Jews and non-Jews alike will gather in Parliament Square to declare that they stand together against antisemitism in the face of Jew-hatred in politics and mounting anti-Jewish hate crime.

Sussex Police has announced that it will hold a disciplinary hearing for a Sergeant who taunted a Jewish officer with pepperoni pizza.

Sergeant Gary Jacobs, who is based in Crawley in West Sussex, will appear at a hearing at force headquarters in Lewes on Tuesday morning to answer allegations that his conduct amounted to a breach of the force’s Standards of Professional Behaviour in respect of equality and diversity.

The notice of the disciplinary hearing states that: “On 8th March 2019, knowing that another officer is Jewish, PS CJ062 Gary Jacobs deliberately dangled a pizza containing pepperoni over that officer’s food. A piece of pepperoni subsequently fell onto that officer’s food meaning they could not eat it [due to Jewish dietary practices prohibiting the consumption of meat from pigs].”

Campaign Against Antisemitism commends Sussex Police for taking this incident of childish bullying by a police officer seriously. We are following the case with interest.

The hearing begins at 10:00 on Tuesday and is expected to last for two days. Members of the public can register to attend until 14:00 on Monday.

The Brexit Party candidate in Brighton Kemptown, Dr Graham Cushway, is reportedly the bassist in a heavy-metal band, Stuka Squadron, whose members dress like Luftwaffe pilots and evoke other Nazi-era symbolism.

Dr Cushway, who holds a PhD in Maritime History, is a former UKIP candidate and ex-soldier. He reportedly goes by the alias “Graham Lord Pyre” in the band, which he co-founded, and has worn the SS Totenkopf insignia on his tie while performing.

The SS, the abbreviation of Schutzstaffel, was a major paramilitary organisation under Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party in Nazi Germany, and later throughout German-occupied Europe during World War II. The Luftwaffe was the aerial warfare branch of the combined German Wehrmacht military forces during World War II.

In a lengthy statement posted on their Facebook page, the band wrote: “Stuka Squadron is — and always was — solely AN ACT. It is an art-house [sic] Heavy Metal band intended from the start to blend elements of musical theatre with traditional Heavy Metal performance. No more, no less. It was intended to be shocking and un-PC at the outset, although this desire waned as it increased in popularity.

“The band is not intended to convey any political message. There is no political agenda and the band members have always represented a cross-section of political opinion. No band member has ever been affiliated to any extreme right or left wing movement, has or had any interest in or sympathy for extreme politics.”

Regarding the use of Nazi-era symbolism, they added: “The band’s look is NOT intended to portray the SS or any other specific military unit from any era. It is the uniform of a fantasy unit existing in an imaginary universe in which vampires played a significant role in World War II.”

A Brexit Party spokesman defended Dr Cushway’s candidacy and told PA News Agency: “He’s fought in two wars and he’s quite a successful metal guitarist. To suggest that he is in any way associated with that which people are trying to associate him with is just silly.”

The spokesman said: “You have to draw a distinction between art and life. The Brexit Party is happy to stand behind Dr Cushway and his candidature — though maybe not his taste in music.”

The Labour Party’s Lloyd Russell-Moyle won the seat with a large majority in 2017.

Greece will officially adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Ekathimerini newspaper reported that Greek Prime Minister, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, made the announcement during a meeting at his office with the President of the Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece, David Saltiel and the head of the Greek Delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), Dr Efstathios Lianos Liantis.

Prime Minister Mitsotakis assigned the country’s vice president, Panagiotis Pikrammenos, with oversight of the project as well as coordinating and supervising the integration of the definition into domestic legislation and education.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds the decision, which demonstrates the Greek government’s solidarity with the Jewish community at this worrying time for Jews in Europe. Several Jewish monuments in Greece have been vandalised recently, particularly in Thessaloniki where about 50,000 Jews were murdered by the Nazis.

Britain was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard for over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Greece will join a growing list of countries to use the International Definition.

In Liverpool Walton, Labour frontbencher Dan Carden has been accused of having sung The Beatles’ song “Hey Jude”, substituting the lyrics with “Hey Jews” during a private bus journey last year. Mr Carden has denied the claim, and Jeremy Corbyn has said that he is “looking into it”.

In Coventry South, Labour candidate Zarah Sultana, who has already courted controversy by adopting the language of antisemitic genocidal terrorist groups in advocating for “violent resistance” against Israelis and saying that she would celebrate the deaths of Tony Blair and other past and present world leaders (for which she was forced to apologise and was defended by Labour frontbencher John McDonnell), is now embroiled in another scandal.

It has emerged that in a Facebook comment posted during the 2016 Labour leadership election, Ms Sultana wrote: “the Labour Right are scum and genuinely make me sick. Is there any form of discrimination that they won’t weaponise to politically point score like they’ve done in the past with antisemitism and now with homophobia?”

Ms Sultana has again been forced to apologise, saying that anyone who calls Labour’s antisemitism crisis a “smear” is “wrong and is contributing to the problem. I would not use the word weaponise today and apologise for having done so.”

However, yet further social media posts have been exposed, showing that Ms Sultana accused Jewish students of being on the payroll of Israel’s Prime Minister.

In Harlow, a Labour target seat where Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn delivered a major speech last week, candidate Laura McAlpine is revealed to have defended her chief campaigner, Brett Hawksbee, when he wrote to colleagues that “the fear of many on the left is that the ideological successors of the bombers of the King David Hotel, the mass murderers who decimated Deir Yassin, would be quite happy to see a pogrom in Gaza and the West Bank, a Jewish final solution to the Palestine problem.”

The comment, which clearly breached the International Definition of Antisemitism for drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis, was even criticised by a Labour Party official, but Ms McAlpine stood by Mr Hawksbee, because “she doesn’t want to be disloyal to someone who organises so much for her.” Mr Hawksbee has been a vocal defender of Chris Williamson, the disgraced MP who resigned from the Labour Party after being told he could not stand as a candidate for the Party.

Although Ms McAlpine has since condemned his comment, Mr Hawksbee was still seen in the front row of the Harlow event, along with Mr Corbyn and Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, Sir Keir Starmer.

In North West Durham, Labour frontbencher Laura Pidcock, who is tipped to become Labour’s new Deputy Leader, said at her campaign launch event: “I know we are on the path towards justice. And I know because Jeremy Corbyn might become PM they will throw everything at us. They will say some really hurtful things. Forgive them. For they know not what they do.”

Ms Pidcock’s final sentence is a line spoken by Jesus before he was crucified, according to the New Testament, and some have observed that it has also been used to stir up religious hatred against Jews in bygone centuries. The suggestion that condemnations of Mr Corbyn for his character or views — including his antisemitism — might be neutralised in this fashion is concerning. Ms Pidcock’s spokesman rejected these criticisms.

In Warrington North, Charlotte Nichols, a GMB national research and policy officer who worked on both of Mr Corbyn’s Labour leadership campaigns in 2015 and 2016 and is a past Young Labour women’s officer, is the Party’s candidate for the safe seat. Ms Nichols, a recent convert to Judaism, attended the controversial Jewdas Seder with Mr Corbyn and is accused of involvement in the “Kaddish for Gaza” event, in which young Jews said a memorial prayer for Hamas terrorists in Parliament Square.

Claudia Webbe, who defended Ken Livingstone after he compared a Jewish journalist to a concentration camp guard, has reportedly been selected as the Labour Party candidate for the safe Labour seat of Leicester East. In 2018, when Ms Webbe was the Chair of the Labour Party’s Disciplinary Panel, she tweeted a claim that the “combined machinery of state, political and mainstream elite” are conspiring to smear Jeremy Corbyn with “false allegations.” Ms Webbe, who previously defended Ken Livingstone after he compared a Jewish journalist to a concentration camp guard, took to Twitter to claim that Mr Corbyn is entirely innocent, and that a sinister and powerful conspiracy is working to attack him. As Chair of the Labour Party’s Disciplinary Panel, Ms Webbe must have known that this kind of language is common in antisemitic conspiracy theories.

Meanwhile, former Home Secretary and Labour peer, Lord Blunkett, has said that the “antisemitism” and “thuggery” in the Labour Party make him despair.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Labour Party MP, Dan Carden, the Shadow International Development Secretary, reportedly changed the lyrics of the iconic Beatles song “Hey Jude” to “Hey Jews” on a late-night bus journey last year.

BuzzFeed News revealed that Mr Carden, the MP for Liverpool Walton, who was a Junior Shadow Minister at the time, allegedly repeatedly sang the chorus of “Hey Jude”, replacing the word “Jude” with “Jews” while on a “raucous” private bus trip back to London from Cheltenham Festival on the evening of Thursday 15th March 2018. When the chorus reached the word “Jude”, Mr Carden reportedly chanted at the top of his voice: “Jews, Jews, Jews.”

Alex Wickham, the Senior Political Correspondent at BuzzFeed News, was seated behind Mr Carden on the bus trip. He said that other Labour MPs and MPs from other parties were also on the bus.

The Sunday Times has reportedly obtained WhatsApp messages that appear to corroborate claims he sang “Hey Jews.”

Mr Carden’s spokesperson told BuzzFeed News that he would never “intentionally” engage in racist or antisemitic behaviour.

Jeremy Corbyn was asked about the incident on a visit to Leeds. He said: “Dan Carden has emphatically denied that. It is an awful story and if it’s true it is utterly and totally unacceptable. I am looking into it.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Steve Hedley, the Senior Assistant General Secretary of the Rail, Maritime and Transport Union (RMT), reportedly launched a tirade against a Jewish anti-racism activist, shouting: “What the Nazis did to you, you’re doing to the Palestinians”, adding: “you’re one of the Chosen People, so you might feel better than me, huh?”

According to the The Daily Mail, the comments were made at a talk in 2011 at the School of African and Oriental Studies (SOAS) entitled “Palestine’s Fight For Freedom.”

Mr Hedley, whom The Daily Mail described as a “militant Jeremy Corbyn supporter,” reportedly told Jewish anti-racism activist, Richard Millett: “You’re an absolute disgrace to the Jewish people. You are a modern-day fascist, you are a modern-day Nazi, by supporting those policies that oppress a…minority in your own state.” He continued: “What the Nazis did to you, you’re doing to the Palestinians.”

Mr Millett responded: “Feel better?”, to which Mr Hedley said: “Better than you, obviously. But then again, you’re one of the chosen people, so you might feel better than me, huh?” Mr Millett said: “So it’s about being Jewish?” and Mr Hedley replied: “It’s about being a Zionist.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” and “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel” are antisemitic.

Mr Millett released the audio of the rant and footage from the talk was included in The Daily Mail story.

Shortly after the event in 2011, the RMT London website, RMT London Calling, published a statement from Mr Hedley. Regarding the phrase, “Chosen People,” he wrote: “I accept that my use of the phrase in the context of the highly inflammatory argument with aggressive and disruptive intruders trying to wreck a public meeting and provoke a reaction, was unwise and I regret using the phrase. I apologise to anyone who may have been offended.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls for Mr Hadley to be dismissed by the RMT. Nobody with his views should hold positions of authority.

Laura Pidcock, the Labour Party’s Shadow Secretary of State for Employment Rights, who is tipped to become Labour’s new Deputy Leader, reportedly used words from Jesus Christ’s crucifixion to describe critics of Jeremy Corbyn at her campaign launch.

Ms Pidcock, who was elected the MP for North West Durham in 2017, said: “I know we are on the path towards justice. And I know because Jeremy Corbyn might become PM they will throw everything at us. They will say some really hurtful things. Forgive them. For they know not what they do.”

Ms Pidcock’s final sentence is a line spoken by Jesus before he was crucified, according to the New Testament, and some have observed that it has also been used to stir up religious hatred against Jews in bygone centuries.

Ms Pidcock’s spokesperson rejected these criticisms and told the JC: “Laura said a well known and often quoted verse from the bible at her campaign launch. Any suggestion that her doing so was antisemitic is absurd and defamatory.”

The suggestion that condemnations of Mr Corbyn for his character or views — including his antisemitism — might be neutralised in this fashion is concerning.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The anonymous student Facebook page, “ExeHonestly”, a platform used by University of Exeter students, has closed in a furore over neo-Nazi posts and is now under investigation by the police.

ExeHonestly had featured several posts including one that read: “People’s favourite number? Mine’s 1488.” This is a coded reference to the neo-Nazi fourteen-word oath: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children”, a slogan initially devised by David Lane, a member of the white supremacist terrorist group “The Order” which was responsible for the murder of Jewish radio host Alan Berg. The number 88 refers to the eighth letter of the alphabet, H, and is intended as a code for “Heil Hitler.” Other posts on the page included anti-black racism.

A University spokesperson told The Tab that the page was “operated by anonymous administrators,” explaining, “We have deep concerns about the content these administrators post that affect our community and we urge our students not to use it. We have reported our concerns about the site to Facebook, and now escalated matters to the police hate crime unit and will work with them to identify those responsible. If we obtain specific information about any of our students posting abusive or offensive content we will take immediate and appropriate action. Racism cannot be tolerated in any form in our community and students can contact us with information or concerns through our ‘Speak Out’ website.”

Speaking to The Tab, Exeter’s Jewish Society said: “We are appalled by the recent posts on ExeHonestly. Whilst we champion free speech and see a great value in it, there is no space for Jewish students, or indeed any students at any university to feel uncomfortable or scared due to their religious, racial or ethnic background. We praise the university for taking action, bringing a problem to the attention of students.”

The administrators of the group meanwhile have claimed ignorance arguing that while they “do not condone any hateful racist content” the “dog-whistle” posts were “not apparent to people unless they have specialised knowledge.” They further attempted to justify their failings claiming that: “It is standard practice on social media for posts to occasionally get through.” They later opted to close the page.

The University has called the response “either not credible or… evidence that they are not capable of hosting a community site” and the police have confirmed they are investigating this as a hate crime.

The University of Exeter has a history of antisemitic incidents. In 2017 the university tried to brush off an antisemitic incident in which a “Rights for Whites” sign was found in halls of residence and a swastika was found carved into a door in on-campus halls Birks Grange, with a spokesman downplaying this blatant antisemitic incident as possibly merely “an ill-judged, deeply offensive joke.”

This follows another alarming antisemitic incident at the university last term in which students were photographed at a sports club social event wearing t-shirts with handwritten antisemitic slogans. One t-shirt bore the slogan: “the Holocaust was a good time.” In response to this, students organised a protest march condemning antisemitism during which they asked Malaka Shwaikh, exposed by Campaign Against Antisemitism over her statements about terrorism and the Holocaust, to address the crowd and make Jewish students feel safe. Whilst professing an admirable desire for solidarity, Shwaikh took the opportunity not to renounce any of her views and to instead berate those “attacking” her as simply venting their “Islamophobic” prejudice.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk.

Claudia Webbe, who defended Ken Livingstone after he compared a Jewish journalist to a concentration camp guard, has reportedly been selected as the Labour Party candidate for the safe Labour seat of Leicester East.

Ms Webbe was appointed as the candidate by a selection panel that included two representatives of the party’s governing body, the National Executive Committee (NEC).

According to Labour List, Ms Webbe is a local party representative on the NEC and the council cabinet member for the environment and transport in Islington. She is also on the executive of the left-wing group, the Campaign for Labour Party Democracy (CLPD).

In 2018, when Ms Webbe was the Chair of the Labour Party’s Disciplinary Panel, she tweeted a claim that the “combined machinery of state, political and mainstream elite” are conspiring to smear Jeremy Corbyn with “false allegations.”

Ms Webbe, who previously defended Ken Livingstone after he compared a Jewish journalist to a concentration camp guard, took to Twitter to claim that Mr Corbyn is entirely innocent, and that a sinister and powerful conspiracy is working to attack him.

As Chair of the Labour Party’s Disciplinary Panel, Ms Webbe must have known that this kind of language is common in antisemitic conspiracy theories.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Birkbeck, University of London is set to host the controversial Socialist Workers Party (SWP) this weekend for an event entitled “The Big Socialist Weekender”.

Ilan Pappé will address the event on the topic: “Anti-Zionism is not antisemitism.”

Zionism is the movement supporting the right of Jews to self-determination. Self-determination is guaranteed to all peoples under article 1 of the UN Charter.

Ilan Pappe has made several inflammatory comments, claiming accusations of antisemitism have been used “to stifle debate on Palestine” and to “depose” politicians supportive of Palestine as well as ridiculing concerns that the Labour Party has a problem with institutional antisemitism. He has also said that Jeremy Corbyn should not “be afraid” after laying a wreath at the grave of the Black September terrorists who tortured and murdered Israeli Olympians, saying: “as an Israeli Jew I was there [at the same graveyard]…and I paid respect for the freedom fighters of Palestine.”

He also defended Chris Williamson’s claim that the Labour Party is “too apologetic” about antisemitism, arguing that “you can’t satisfy these beasts.”

Mr Pappe has also defended Jeremy Corbyn’s connection to Holocaust denier Paul Eisen and other antisemites as well as his links to terror groups.

Many of these comments have come while delivering speeches of the same title at previous events, making it likely that they could be repeated this weekend.

To add insult to injury, the event attempting to whitewash antisemitism is set to take place on a Saturday, the Jewish sabbath. This severely limits the Jewish community’s ability to participate in an event designed to define their own oppression. The SWP has form on this front, having previously been involved in an event featuring the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), hosted by their front organisation Stand Up to Racism on the holiest night of the Jewish calendar, Kol Nidrei, the night of Yom Kippur.

Birkbeck has previously come under scrutiny over an antisemitic demonstrator at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London, who was filmed claiming that the Holocaust happened because Jews are “cowards”. He was later reportedly sighted being escorted off campus by security staff at Birkbeck, University of London. The man had been filmed by students and a member of Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Demonstration and Event Monitoring Unit at a demonstration at SOAS.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will be approaching Birkbeck to urge the university to reconsider this event and its overtly inflammatory speaker.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail campus@antisemitism.uk. 

The former Labour cabinet minister Ivan Lewis has hit out at his former party, calling it an “institutionally racist, antisemitic party” in an interview for the Jewish Telegraph podcast.

In a blistering attack Mr Lewis warned that supporters of the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn would be “facilitating an institutionally racist government if Corbyn got elected” and that “anybody that posts a leaflet, makes a telephone call, or stuffs an envelope on behalf of the Momentum or Corbynite candidates in this election is colluding with and endorsing racism.”

He continued: “If they do that, and don’t see it in that way what they are then acknowledging is that antisemitism is somehow a second class form of racism.” He urged people “even at this late stage to examine their conscience.”

In reference to the International Definition of Antisemitism, which includes “denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination” as an example of antisemitism, Mr Lewis asked: “Why are we the only minority that doesn’t have the right to self-determination in our own state? The answer to that is that’s antisemitism, as the definition says.”

He also accused Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn of antisemitism, saying: “The man who wants to be Prime Minister believes that the existence of the state of Israel is a racist endeavour”, which is antisemitic according to the International Definition.

Mr Lewis resigned from the Labour Party in 2018, saying that he “could no longer reconcile my Jewish identity and current Labour politics”. Accusing Jeremy Corbyn and Seumas Milne, Mr Corbyn’s Executive Director of Strategy and Communications, of treating Jews differently, he also revealed that Mr Corbyn had sacked him from the front bench by text message after Mr Lewis requested a meeting to discuss antisemitism with him.

He is now running as an independent candidate in the general election.

On 28th May, the EHRC launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Scottish National Party (SNP) leader Nicola Sturgeon has confirmed that her Party would support a minority Labour government led by Jeremy Corbyn if certain policies are pursued. She said she “would drive a hard bargain”.

Recently, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to all the Opposition parties in Parliament (other than Labour) asking whether they would rule out making Mr Corbyn, who is an antisemite, Prime Minister.

The Rt Hon. Ian Blackford MP provided the SNP’s detailed response, in which he wrote: “I want to make it clear that the SNP abhors antisemitism in the strongest possible way. We believe that the recent political events show that now more than ever politicians should be responsible with their actions and use language with care. The SNP is absolutely opposed to racism and antisemitism in all its forms.”

Nevertheless, the SNP then and again now has affirmed its readiness to back Mr Corbyn. It is difficult to square the Party’s self-proclaimed commitment to oppose racism and antisemitism in all its forms while also backing an antisemitic leader for Prime Minister.

Principled opposition to racism is incompatible with a willingness to be bought for the price of a few policies.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is disgusted at suggestions by Labour frontbencher John McDonnell that Ian Austin, who quit the Labour Party over antisemitism and recently gave a series of interviews criticising the Labour leader over antisemitism and extremism, did so because he is “employed by the Tories”.

Mr Austin, who is the adopted son of a Holocaust survivor and an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, is a Government trade envoy to Israel, a cross-party, unpaid, voluntary position unconnected to the Conservative Party. Last week he gave a series of interviews in which he claimed that Labour is “poisoned by anti-Jewish racism”.

Mr McDonnell, the Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, said: “What else do you expect him to do in an election campaign when employed by the Tories? You speak on behalf of the Tories. That’s what this was about this morning.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism deplores the suggestion that Mr Austin’s concerns about antisemitism in the Labour Party are motivated by greed or desire for money.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Rebecca Jenkins, Labour’s candidate in Redditch near Birmingham, reportedly shared a Facebook post supporting the large antisemitic public mural in Towers Hamlet.

According to the political website Guido Fawkes, Ms Jenkins shared and commented on a post showing the infamous mural, using a now-deleted Facebook account. She reportedly wrote “Hear hear!” to a post with a picture of the mural and the words: “All we gotta do is stand up and it’s game over!!” The post included a comment from another user: “Where in this picture is it antisemitism.”

Jeremy Corbyn defended the public display of the mural in 2012 which was painted on a wall in London’s East End and featured apparently-Jewish bankers beneath a pyramid often used by conspiracy theorists playing Monopoly on a board carried by straining, oppressed workers.

Guido Fawkes also revealed that Ms Jenkins shared a post on Facebook with a comment from Noam Chomsky, accusing the media of “manipulating the population” to convince them that Mr Corbyn is antisemitic. “One must admire the incredible skills the media have in manipulating the population. They’ve managed to convince many that the most passionate Anti-Racist Campaigner of the last 40 years, Jeremy Corbyn, is actually Pro-Racist and Anti-Semitic.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Labour’s election candidate in the Scottish constituency of Gordon has withdrawn from the race after it emerged that she had compared the Jewish State to a child abuser and the Nazis, as Party officials as accused of having tried to cover up the incident to protect her.

In an apparent reference to Jewish suffering in the Holocaust, Ms Ramsden reportedly wrote: “Like many abusers, unable to reflect on their own abuse, and ending up recreating it in the abuse of others, exerting their power in those weaker than themselves because once they were the powerless.”

She further wrote that “to me the Israeli state is like an abused child who becomes an abusive adult,” adding: “like child abuse it has to stop…as we intervene with child abusers the international community needs to intervene with Israel.” She also lamented: “I heard yesterday that almost 90 per cent of Jewish Israelis support their government.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis is antisemitic. Mr Ramsden reportedly opposed the adoption of the International Definition by the Labour Party.

Ms Ramsden, who is a senior official at Unison, the trade union, also contended that claims of antisemitism against Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn were “orchestrated by the wealthy establishment who do not want a socialist Labour government.”

Despite ludicrous assertions by Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer John McDonnell that the Party is doing everything it can on antisemitism and has done everything the Jewish community has asked, there are claims that Labour’s compliance unit in fact told Ms Ramsden that if she deleted the blog post containing her comments about the Jewish State and child abuse, she could remain a candidate.

Following an outcry, Ms Ramsden has stepped down as a candidate, saying: “I can see that many Jewish people have been hurt by my words. That was never my intention and I apologise unreservedly.”

Ms Ramsden’s departure from the race comes after Gideon Bull withdrew as a parliamentary candidate in Clacton after Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised his use of the word “Shylock” to describe a Jewish fellow councillor. It has since emerged that he has also used other racist language.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Lord David Blunkett, the former Labour Party Home Secretary, said that antisemitism within Labour makes him “despair.”

Writing in a letter to The Telegraph, Lord Blunkett said: “The behaviour of the hard left within the Labour party — the antisemitism, the thuggery, the irrational views on security and international issues, and the lack of realisation that you have to embrace a big tent of people in order to win — certainly makes me despair.”

Lord Blunkett, who was a Labour MP for 28 years before becoming a Labour peer, urged Labour moderates, however, to remain in the party: “Whatever Labour moderates might think of the leadership, therefore, quitting is not an option – because there is going to be a future for Labour, and the future is worth fighting for. “

He added: “These moderate voices may not yet have succeeded in defeating the top-down approach or the antisemitism, but in policy terms they have had an impact – along with the more sensible trade unions, who constantly get forgotten, but who do matter.”

In March this year, Campaign Against Antisemitism met with Lord Blunkett to update him on our work and efforts to counter antisemitism.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Dyfed-Powys Police in Wales has upheld a professional standards complaint from Campaign Against Antisemitism over the way that antisemitic e-mails were dismissed as just “stating an opinion” by one of the force’s officers.

Dyfed-Powys Police has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it is reopening the case and recording the incident as a hate crime under the Malicious Communications Act. They have formally apologised saying they “completely share the concerns you raised.”

The Divisional Detective Inspector in the Pembrokeshire Division has been asked to review the crime and appropriately allocate the necessary resources to investigate.

When discussing an allegation against Daniel Davies, the owner of Tribestan UK, for the antisemitic e-mails sent to an Israeli man who attempted to order items from the company, Campaign Against Antisemitism was told that the matter would merely be recorded as a hate incident rather than a hate crime. When pressed on this, the officer said that he had reviewed the complaint, and that it would be recorded as the less serious matter, as the e-mails were simply “stating an opinion”.

One of the e-mails sent by Tribestan UK stated: “Unfortunately Jews have negativity on our businesses. Do you know why? Because Jews rip us off! Jews f*** us up!”

A second e-mail sent a short while later stated: “We don’t ship to Israel because the Jews rob us! Sorry but that’s a fact. They scam the world.”

Mr Davies claimed that “our e-mail got hacked via wifi over a business phone”, which is a common excuse that we have heard from other companies that have sent antisemitic messages that they later claimed were the work of hackers.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is providing legal support to the recipient of the e-mails so that a civil claim can be brought against the company.

At a time when British Jews are threatened by levels of antisemitism unprecedented in the UK since the end of the Second World War, effective law enforcement is a vital deterrent. Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds Dyfed-Powys Police for recognising its initial failure in this matter and remedying it by reopening the investigation.

The famous Soviet “refusnik” and human rights campaigner, Natan Sharansky, has said that the antisemitism in the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn is reminiscent of the USSR.

Mr Sharansky, who became famous for being refused the right to emigrate to Israel by Soviet authorities but eventually rose to become Israel’s Deputy Prime Minister, expressed concern in an interview that Mr Corbyn and many of his supporters adopt positions on Israel and Zionists redolent of the antisemitic rhetoric in the Soviet Union under Stalin.

Mr Sharasnky declared that Mr Corbyn’s “extreme anti-Zionism” is “practically almost impossible to differ sometimes from antisemitism”, reminiscing how the support he received from Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was enhanced by the backing of Labour activists and lamenting that now, looking at the Labour Party, “as we know from Russia, it starts from anti-Zionism and goes to classic antisemitism and then much further.”

He urged Mr Corbyn to “change your positions [on Hamas and related matters] or stop lying that you have no problem with Jews.”

Mr Sharasnky said that he finds antisemitism “easier to identify” because “I am from the Soviet Union, Stalin’s Soviet Union. When the Soviet Union was speaking against Israel, everybody knew that it was about your Jewish neighbours…and when Soviet propaganda was speaking about ‘cosmopolites’, everybody knew that it was about Jews. These rather cold words which were used for a very open antisemitic campaign against Jews who are ‘not a loyal part of our population’ and Israel was simply used as proof that they’re not loyal.” He added that “for me it is so easy because it looks exactly like Soviet rhetoric…that was official Soviet propaganda, and the fact that it is now repeated by Iran and supported by Corbyn, that’s very sad.”

Fearing the growing acceptance of anti-Jewish prejudice, Mr Sharasnky said that “it’s surprising for me how Britain has become an example that antisemitism doesn’t stand on the extremes. It starts from the extremes and then goes to the mainstream.” He also noted that he hears “all the time from” British Jews, including “some serious representatives of the Jewish community of London” who are considering moving to Israel out of fear of a Corbyn-led government in the UK, with some families “buying apartments…not for them, for their children.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Cars and homes in Essex’s Canvey Island have been daubed with swastikas and slogans such as “Jews out!” The swastikas were drawn the wrong way around.

The graffiti was sprayed on the homes and vehicles between late last night and early this morning.

Today is Remembrance Sunday, when the nation remembers those who lost their lives fighting against the Nazis and other enemies.

Canvey Island has a growing Jewish population as Jews in north London bringing up young families move to areas where property prices are lower. Local residents have mostly been very welcoming towards their Jewish neighbours.

An Essex Police spokesperson said: “We are investigating after several reports of criminal damage to cars in Ferrymead, Canvey Island overnight. We were called this morning, Sunday 10 November, to reports that vehicles had been sprayed with racist and anti-Semitic graffiti. If you have not yet spoken to us about damage to your vehicle please call [the police on] 101 and quote incident number 307 of today’s date.”

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The perpetrators of this act of vandalism and intimidation must feel the full force of the law. Anybody with information should immediately step forward to assist the police.”

A polling expert has reported that in a focus group in a London constituency that he carried out, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was “slated for antisemitism.” James Johnson, who used to conduct polling for 10 Downing Street under Theresa May, said that the public “did not know what this word meant a year ago” but that when the focus group began, it “Came up straight away”.

Campaign Against Antisemitism considers this to be a reassuring vindication of our work to educate the public about antisemitism and raise awareness of the extent of anti-Jewish prejudice in British politics and society, and that of our allies within and without the Jewish community.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The historic Middle Street Synagogue in Brighton has reportedly been vandalised with red paint splashed on its famous front doors.

The incident was revealed by journalist and author, Lyn Julius, on Facebook. Ms Julius is scheduled to speak at the synagogue on Sunday.

The synagogue is a popular tourist attraction. The Grade II* listed building has what is regarded as Brighton’s second most important interior after the Royal Pavilion. Opened in 1875 and designed by local architect Thomas Lainson, it is one of the last remaining “cathedral synagogues” from the Golden Age of High Victorian synagogue architecture.

In May this year, Labour Party member and activist, Amanda Bishop, called for fellow activists to “march” on her local synagogue in Brighton.

Ms Bishop wrote in the Brighton and Hove Labour Party Facebook forum that: “We can’t allow this to go on. We need to march about this on the Synagogue in Hove, all of us members in Brighton.” Her call for direct action against the synagogue was in response to the suspension of Alexandrina Braithwaite, from the Brighton and Hove Labour branch, for sharing allegedly antisemitic posts on social media, which Ms Bishop felt was “bulls***”.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “This cowardly act of vandalism against a historic synagogue comes just months after a prominent Labour activist called for a march on a synagogue nearby. It is yet further evidence of the extent to which antisemites have come to feel empowered to demonstrate their hatred of Jews. It is vital that the perpetrator is apprehended and feels the full force of the law.” 

Anyone with information should contact Sussex Police by calling 101.

Lord Mann, the former Labour MP who quit the Party over antisemitism, has been named ‘campaigner of the week’ by The House magazine for his work countering antisemitism.

As the Government’s new independent advisor on antisemitism, Lord Mann says “opposing antisemitism: to me the only odd thing is why everyone doesn’t do it.”

In a reference to polling of the Jewish community in recent years, he went on to say: “The notion that anyone feels unsafe in this country, feels that they don’t have a future in this country because of antisemitism, is abhorrent to everything that is British, everything about our country, everything about our values, everything about our Parliament.”

Lamenting the lack of leadership in Parliament on this issue, Lord Mann said: “The definition of leadership is to stand up against injustice and intolerance. And therefore every MP should be standing up against antisemitism… that’s why I get so angry when people choose not to…. You don’t pick and choose which bits of antisemitism you stand up against – you stand up against all of it.”

Lord Mann is concerned about “making sure there are consequences for the antisemites” and wishes to see the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism worldwide, “not just by governments and political parties but by football clubs, by universities, by employers.”

His message to the Jewish community: “you will not be left to fight antisemitism on your own”. 

Asked about Rabbi Dr Jonathan Romain’s letter urging tactical voting in the election to keep Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn out of Downing Street, Lord Mann said: “it is a sad state of affairs that a respected rabbi feels it’s appropriate to be writing such a letter… the leader of the Labour Party should reflect on why it’s got to this appalling situation and work with me to turn it around.””

Lord Mann has previously warned that between overstatement and understatement of antisemitism, “the biggest danger is that we will understate the problem,” and has called Ken Livingstone a “f***ing disgrace” and a “Nazi apologist”.

Previously the MP for Bassetlaw, Lord Mann left Labour saying that Mr Corbyn had “given the green light to the antisemites” and that the Party leader was not “appropriate to be Prime Minister”. Lord Mann is now a crossbench peer.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

BBC Panorama is a finalist in the British Journalism Awards in the category of ‘Investigation’ for its programme titled “Is Labour Anti-Semitic?”, which explored antisemitism in the Labour Party.

The episode’s creators, John Ware, Leo Telling, Neil Grant and Rachel Jupp, have also been shortlisted in the ‘Politics Journalism’ category.

The programme, which was televised in July, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and it is understood that they and Mr Ware have now commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases are being brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The Labour Party also submitted a 28-page complaint to the BBC, claiming the programme failed to meet the BBC’s standards but it is understood that the BBC’s Executive Complaints Unit, which is the top level of the broadcaster’s internal complaints process, decided to back the makers of the episode. Labour may now take its complaint to Ofcom.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The Most Reverend Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, has called on the Government to pressure universities to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The Government responded that as universities are independent, the Government could not apply pressure but could issue guidance, and that the Government “strongly encourages” institutions of higher education to adopt the International Definition.

It is understood that so far only five such institutions have done so.

Robert Jenrick, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has also previously expressed concern regarding “the disgraceful experiences that Jewish students have lived through at certain universities,” and has called for local councils and universities to follow the UK Government in adopting the International Definition, indicating that he intended to take action in this direction.

He has since written to local councils urging them to adopt the International Definition.

Gideon Bull, Labour’s prospective parliamentary candidate in Clacton, has withdrawn his candidacy after Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised a past comment he made referring to a Jewish fellow Labour councillor as “Shylock” earlier this year, in an apparent reference to the villainous Shakespearean Jewish moneylender.

Cllr Bull reportedly made the comment when he was a Labour councillor at Haringey Council in London, where he also served in the cabinet. The recipient of his abuse made a complaint.

In his withdrawal statement, Cllr Bull said that he used an “analogy when referring to a housing decision” and “was not referring to the councillor”, and after being informed that the comment was “offensive”, he said that he “immediately apologised and explained that I did not know that Shylock was Jewish and I would never have mentioned Shylock if I had known this. I grew up in a working class area in Ilford where this was a common saying, but I didn’t know it was offensive. This was a genuine accident and I reiterate my sincere apology for this mistake.”

The revelation came after an analysis by Campaign Against Antisemitism showed how supporters of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn are trying to place a cast of Jew-haters, antisemitism-deniers and Jew-baiters in dozens of constituencies ahead of general election.

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Gideon Bull’s comment, in which he called a Jewish fellow councillor ‘Shylock’, after the villainous Shakespearean Jewish character, was unacceptable, and of course he had to withdraw his candidacy. Not a day goes by without a revelation about a Labour candidate’s troubling record in relation to Jews, exemplifying the institutional antisemitism of the Party under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn. It is a reflection of the present state of the Labour Party that other candidates who have said and done much worse remain as candidates.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The former Labour MP Ian Austin, who resigned from the Party over antisemitism, has given a series of powerful interviews this morning condemning antisemitism in the Labour Party and announcing that he will not be seeking re-election.

Speaking on Sky News, Mr Austin, who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, was asked if his decision to leave the Labour Party and stand down as an MP was “personal”. In response, he explained: “I joined the Labour Party as a teenager in Dudley. I was a councillor there in my twenties, I worked for the Party and for the Labour Government in my thirties, and I became an MP and a Government minister in my forties, so this has been my life. This has been my life.

“I can’t really believe it’s come to this,” he said, “but I’ve got to be honest with people: I think that Jeremy Corbyn is unfit to lead the Labour Party. I think he’s certainly unfit to lead the country.”

Asserting that only two individuals can be Prime Minister the day after the election, Mr Austin remarkably declared: “I’ve sadly come to the conclusion that it can’t be Jeremy Corbyn,” and endorsed the Conservative Party Leader instead.

Visibly emotional, Mr Austin pointed out that he “could just disappear off back to Dudley, never say a word, keep quiet — but I think people in politics have got to stand up and tell the truth and you’ve got to do what you think is right, however difficult it is.”

In support of his decision, Mr Austin asserted that Mr Corbyn and Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, John McDonnell, have spent their careers in politics “working with, defending, supporting all types of extremists, including antisemites,” and backing genocidal antisemitic terrorist groups such as Hamas and Hizballah, whom Mr Corbyn has described as “friends”.

Mr Austin insisted that he has “thought about this long and hard,” and said: “But most shameful of all…you know under his [Mr Corbyn’s} leadership a political party with a proud record – a long history – fighting for equality, fighting racism, has become poisoned with anti-Jewish racism and it is a complete and utter disgrace, a complete disgrace.”

Earlier in the morning, Labour frontbencher Rebecca Long-Bailey was asked to respond to similar remarks by Mr Austin that he had made earlier still. She belittled his concerns as simply emerging from differences with Mr Corbyn on matters of policy, and insisted that although Labour had been slow to act on antisemitism, it had now instituted suitable processes and would in time win back the confidence of the Jewish community.

To this Mr Austin responded: “There’s no way they’ve dealt with this, and some of the people they’re selecting as candidates, even over the last few days, have said and done things which are unacceptable, and Jeremy himself by the way has said and done things which are antisemitic.”

Emphasising that “I’m not a Tory” and that “I’m not a Conservative. This isn’t where I wanted to be,” Mr Austin said that his decision today “has been the toughest thing.”

He proceeded to emphasise that antisemitism is an “institutional problem” in the Labour Party, observing that former Labour MPs Luciana Berger and Dame Louise Ellman were “chased out of the Party by racists” and they also “tried to target Margaret Hodge,” another female Jewish MP.

Mr Austin noted that Labour is the first party in history to be subjected to a full statutory investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission. That inquiry was launched on 28th May following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

He also reminded viewers that almost nine out of ten British Jews believe Mr Corbyn is antisemitic, and said: “You’ve got to ask yourself: if a political party has caused such offence and distress to one of Britain’s communities, whose side are you on? Whose side are you on? When it comes to racism, I know what my responsibility is. This is a basic question of what’s right and what’s wrong. I think this is a really fundamental issue, and if you’re not going to stand up and tell the truth and do what’s right on something like racism, what are you going to do it on? What are you going to do it on?”

Anticipating that good friends of his who are standing as Labour candidates will feel betrayed and upset, and that some lifelong friends may not speak to him again, he declared that “in politics you’ve got to face up to tough decisions and do what you think is right.”

Asked whether he was abandoning others who have chosen to stay in the Labour Party and fight, Mr Austin replied: “I didn’t leave the Labour Party to join another Party. I didn’t do that in February. I left to shine a spotlight on what’s happening in the Party. And to demand other people step up and do something about it. And I’ve been fighting about this and arguing about this…people have said to me: ‘Ian you’ve got to stay and fight’. I said: ‘where’s the fight? You want me to stay and fight you’d better start fighting.’ I didn’t walk away from this fight.”

Mr Austin recognised the culpability of his erstwhile Party and colleagues: “This has happened on our watch. We have a responsibility for this. I can say it’s nothing to do with me and walk away from it all, but in the end, we’ve allowed this to happen in the Labour Party and we’ve got to take responsibility for it. And I do not want him [Mr Corbyn] to do to the country what I think he’s done to the Labour Party.” He also pointed out that he has launched a new organisation to combat extremism in politics.

Speaking of Mr Corbyn, Mr Austin concluded: “I think the Labour Party has been poisoned with extremism, intolerance, and antisemitism under his leadership,” adding: “It’s heartbreaking. I think what’s happened to the Labour Party is heartbreaking.”

Joe Glasman, Head of Political and Government Investigations at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Ian Austin is truly a hero of the Jewish community and upstanding people everywhere. He is an inspiration to Jews and others who also once called the Labour Party their political home but who cannot remain in the Party under its antisemitic leadership. When it comes to integrity, Ian has few rivals, and we join him in mourning the Labour Party that was.”

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Gavin Shuker, a former Labour MP who quit the Party over antisemitism, has accused his former colleagues who remained in Labour of “chucking the Jews under the bus.”

Reacting to the news that Labour’s Deputy Leader, Tom Watson, will not stand for re-election, Mr Shuker declared on BBC’s Newsnight that “the moderates in the Labour Party have lost”.

Mr Shuker said that those who remained in Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party “have done a deal with the devil” in order to pursue certain policy objectives while ignoring the problems that, Mr Shuker said, Mr Corbyn’s leadership presents, including antisemitism. As to their choice to remain in the Party when he and others left, he said: “history will judge them.”

With Mr Watson gone, Mr Shuker said of the moderates that “the fig leaf of Tom Watson is no longer there and their shame is there for all to see.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The disgraced MP, Chris Williamson, has submitted an extraordinary letter of resignation from the Labour Party that reads like a manifesto against Jews, replete with references to a “witch hunt”, “smears”, outsized Israeli power and opposition to Labour’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism. He also suggests that the General Secretary of the Labour Party agrees with his views.

The letter follows a determination by the Party that he cannot be a Labour candidate in his constituency of Derby North. However, Mr Williamson, who has been on suspension from the Party, says that he shall stand as an independent candidate.

In his letter, Mr Williamson expressed to General-Secretary Jennie Formby his dismay that Labour officials have “enabled and executed what I believe to be a witch hunt against hundreds of socialists loyal to Jeremy Corbyn and his transformative, socialist, anti-imperialist worldview.”

He elaborated that “many of the victims of this witch hunt have been Jewish socialists,” presumably a reference to his friend, the antisemitic founder of Labour Against the Witch Hunt, Jackie Walker, who claimed that she was Jewish in response to uproar over her antisemitic comments.

Not only does Mr Williamson describe the Labour antisemitism crisis as “smears”, but suggests that Ms Formby agrees: “you and others share my belief that the antisemitism smears against Labour Party activists, candidates and MPs are unfounded.”

The letter proceeds to suggest that the century-old Jewish Labour Movement was revived “in 2015 at the same time as the State of Israel launched a diplomatic strategy to…normalise Zionism in our movement,” an unsubtle suggestion that the Jewish State is playing an insidious role in internal Labour politics.

He also absurdly asserts that the “witch hunt” serves the objectives of “Britain First and the Jewish Defence League”, whom he accuses of having “led the campaign for the Labour Party to adopt” the International Definition, which he evidently opposes.

Back in February, when Mr Williamson was first suspended, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn leapt to his defence, saying: “Chris Williamson is a very good, very effective Labour MP. He’s a very strong anti-racist campaigner. He is not antisemitic in any way.”

Mr Williamson is well-known for having baited Jews by dismissing allegations of antisemitism as “proxy wars and bulls***” whilst supporting Labour activists like Marc Wadsworth and Ms Walker who were expelled from the Party over their comments. He has been suspended by Labour three times (although the second suspension was overturned by the High Court).

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Labour’s prospective parliamentary candidate in Clacton is understood to have referred to a Jewish Labour councillor as “Shylock” earlier this year, in an apparent reference to the villainous Shakespearean Jewish character.

Gideon Bull reportedly made the comment when he was a Labour councillor at Haringey Council in London, where he also served in the cabinet. The recipient of his abuse made a complaint.

Cllr. Bull also had the Labour whip withdrawn over his opposition to certain local development plans.

The revelation comes after an analysis by Campaign Against Antisemitism showed how supporters of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn are trying to place a cast of Jew-haters, antisemitism-deniers and Jew-baiters in dozens of constituencies ahead of general election.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

It is being reported that a second rabbi has written to his congregants urging them to vote for the party most likely to defeat Labour in their constituency.

Rabbi Yuval Keren of Southgate Progressive Synagogue wrote that “the problem lies with Jeremy Corbyn and the present Labour leadership who tolerate and allow antisemitism to rise from within its ranks”.

He went on to suggest that “if you too believe that a Corbyn-led government would be detrimental to Jewish life as we know it, you should put aside all other considerations and vote for the party that is most likely to defeat Labour in your local constituency.”

Rabbi Keren’s letter makes reference to that of Rabbi Dr Jonathan Romain, who wrote in similar terms to his congregants a few days ago.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

Community leaders in Stamford Hill have challenged their local MP, Diane Abbott, over her claim that “not every element of the Jewish community says Jeremy Corbyn is an antisemite” and that, in contrast to other communal bodies and newspapers, the “Jewish community in Stamford Hill doesn’t say that.”

When pressed on Labour’s response to its antisemitism crisis, Ms Abbott insisted that “we are still doing everything we can,” echoing comments over the weekend by the Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, John McDonnell.

Community leaders rejected Ms Abbott’s characterisation that “one of the biggest voting blocks in Hackney is in Stamford Hill which historically is a large and vibrant Jewish community and I’ve spoken to them about this” and that “I talk to them all the time. I listen to the people and I listen to my constituents.”

Rabbi Abraham Pinter, a former Labour councillor in the area and a prominent figure in the community, described Ms Abbott as “being totally out of touch with the reality” of how Jews in her constituency feel about antisemitism.

Rabbi Pinter went on to say: “I don’t know who she is talking about. Because there is no question that the majority of the people I talk to in the community are talking about antisemitism in the party, it is a concern in the community. We have others, but to suggest that we are not concerned about what has happened in the Labour Party or think they have done enough is false.”

He accused the Shadow Home Secretary of deploying “imperialistic tactics of divide and rule” and using the ultra-orthodox Charedi community “for political gain”. He added that “my personal experiences of antisemitism in the Labour party are well documented. She knows about them and yet she has the arrogance to ignore the issue.” He also resented her suggestion that the community votes as a “block”, which he described as “arrogance”.

Rabbi Pinter and others even contested Ms Abbott’s assertion that she speaks to the community, with one leader maintaining that “the idea that she engages with us or reaches out to talk is utter lies. We have never heard from her. She doesn’t engage with us and she doesn’t understand our concerns.”

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, John McDonnell, has audaciously claimed that on antisemitism the Labour Party will “come out of this I think as an example of how you do address these issues within a political party and I think other political parties need to learn from that.”

Mr McDonnell made the extraordinary remark in an LBC interview. Host Iain Dale also asked Mr McDonnell why Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn does not sue those who call him an antisemite, since “I can’t think of many worse insults” and “if you know you’re not antisemitic why wouldn’t you take action?” Mr McDonnell responded that Mr Corbyn is “not the sort of person who resorts to courts” and that “courts are not the sort of place for that sort of action.”

The interview also explored numerous other areas of Labour’s antisemitic terrain, including the case of disgraced MP Chris Williamson, who is best known for baiting Jews by dismissing allegations of antisemitism as “proxy wars and bulls***” whilst supporting Labour activists like Marc Wadsworth and Jackie Walker who were expelled from the Party over their comments. He has been suspended by Labour three times (although the second suspension was overturned by the High Court). He is currently on suspension while his case is reviewed yet again by the Party.

Asked by Mr Dale whether he wants Mr Williamson to be a candidate in the coming general election, Mr McDonnelll said that Mr Williamson’s case is currently under consideration and therefore he would not wish to say anything that might prejudice the case. To this Mr Dale responded: “the right answer to that question was ‘no’,” noting that this is another example of the Labour Party equivocating on a case related to the matter of antisemitism.

Indeed much of Mr McDonnell’s focus in this interview, as in other interviews, has been on process, saying of Dame Louise Ellman’s resignation from the Labour Party that “she’s wrong” to have quit because “everything she’s asked us to do we’re doing”.

Indeed Mr McDonnell also deployed the transparent rhetorical device of ‘whataboutettery’ when he tried to steer attention away from Mr Corbyn’s leadership by observing that there is antisemitism in all political parties and that it featured too in the Labour Party under Tony Blair. Mr Dale retorted that, regardless, Jews are only leaving the Labour Party, and he also pointed out that many Jews are even thinking of leaving the country if Labour comes to power, suggesting that this was “embarrassing”. Mr McDonnell described it instead as “saddening” and insisted that Jews have “no grounds” to take such action.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In recent months, thirteen MPs and three peers have resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism, along with a large number of MEPs, councillors and members.

Over 57,000 people have now signed our petition denouncing Jeremy Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

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Campaign Against Antisemitism is a volunteer-led charity dedicated to exposing and countering antisemitism through education and zero-tolerance enforcement of the law. Everything that we do is done by people who volunteer their time, using donations contributed by members of the public. Join the fight against antisemitism by subscribing to our updates, volunteering, or donating.

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