A Jewish student who videoed a couple after one of them told her “We should have gassed the lot of you” has posted on Facebook that she believes the perpetrator has been identified.

In the course of an altercation about seating at The Hedley Verity pub in Leeds, Danielle Greyman was told that she looks like a Jew and “We should have f***ing gassed the lot of you” by a man with a local accent who claimed to be “a German”, apparently to drive home his antisemitic abuse.

Ms Greyman said that she began to record a video of the man and his companion after he asked whether she was Jewish in the midst of their argument.

As the man turned his attention to Ms Greyman’s Judaism, he made the hateful antisemitic remark. Mr Greyman retorted: “If you want to gas my people, I will take you to court. I’m not joking — I will ruin your whole f***ing life.”

Wetherspoons staff asked the couple to leave and banned them from returning.

A spokesperson for West Yorkshire Police said: “Police were called at around [17:45 on Thursday] to a report of a hate incident which is believed to have happened a short time prior. The victim reported being verbally abused by three suspects outside a bar on Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, before the suspects made off. Enquiries remain ongoing and officers are making attempts to speak to the victim. Anyone with information should contact police on 101, quoting log 1439 of 06/08. Any incidents motivated by hostility and hate are unacceptable and are taken very seriously by West Yorkshire Police.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has attempted to contact the victim to offer assistance in ensuring that the perpetrators face the full force of the law.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Clearly this man felt completely comfortable telling a Jewish student that he felt the Holocaust was unfinished business in broad daylight in a busy pub. He must face the full force of the law. We are encouraged that West Yorkshire Police is taking this seriously and that the perpetrator has reportedly been identified, and we stand ready to assist the victim should she decide to contact us.”

The Cabinet Office has confirmed to Campaign Against Antisemitism that it is now reviewing Wiley’s MBE, in response a letter that we wrote to the Honours Forfeiture Committee calling for the antisemitic grime rapper to be stripped of the honour.

In a letter from the Cabinet Office, the Honours and Appointments Secretariat has advised that the Honours Forfeiture Committee “is able to consider cases for a variety of reasons,” including “being found guilty of a criminal offence” and “behaviour that is deemed to bring the honours system into disrepute”.

The letter went on to confirm that the Committee is acting on Campaign Against Antisemitism’s representations and has opened a case.

Additionally, in a departure for the Committee, which normally does not publish its decisions, the letter confirmed that Campaign Against Antisemitism will be kept informed of progress.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has also launched a Parliamentary petition for racists to be stripped of their honours automatically. The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333141/

Campaign Against Antisemitism has also written to the Ivors Academy calling for Wiley’s 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award to be rescinded.

Moreover, Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for Wiley to be prosecuted and stands ready to take legal action if the authorities do not.

Wiley has also been banned from TwitterInstagram, Facebook and YouTube after using the platforms to incite racial hatred against Jews.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has submitted evidence to the House of Commons Justice Committee in its inquiry into private prosecutions, drawing on our wealth of experience in this area.

Although the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) usually undertakes prosecutions of criminal activity, individuals and civil society organisations, like Campaign Against Antisemitism, can launch private prosecutions if the CPS fails to act, and we have done so in the past. However, the CPS can then take over such private prosecutions, with a view either to continuing them or to discontinuing them.

Our submission to the inquiry focused on the role of the CPS in taking over private prosecutions.

The concerns we raised were twofold: “firstly, the CPS is able to refuse to prosecute and then to prevent a private prosecutor from prosecuting; and secondly, a challenge to such intervention by the CPS is judged against an almost impossibly high bar.”

With regard to the first point, we noted that “A decision by the CPS not to prosecute can be a decision to deny justice. Private prosecution exists as a check on that power, to enable individuals and organisations, like CAA, to pursue justice when the state does not.”

Accordingly, we recommended that “The CPS should not be permitted to regulate itself in this manner. Whilst it should be at liberty to take over private prosecutions in order to continue them, any decision to discontinue a private prosecution should be made by an independent party. We submit that the independent party should be a senior barrister acting as a reviewer of private prosecutions.”

Concerning challenges to decisions by the CPS, whether not to prosecute or to discontinue a private prosecution, we observed that “A decision by the CPS not to prosecute or to discontinue a private prosecution is subject to judicial review, however the courts have interpreted their discretion very narrowly. Campaign Against Antisemitism has sought judicial reviews and both succeeded and failed, however there are many occasions when we have not sought judicial review because we know the bar to be set almost impossibly high.”

We therefore recommended that “judicial review of a decision [by the CPS] not to prosecute or to discontinue a private prosecution should be judged on the balance of probabilities and not on the existing threshold. This would force the CPS to consider decisions to prosecute or to discontinue private prosecutions more carefully, and would ensure that more crimes are heard by the criminal courts and not written off by the CPS with almost no accountability.”

The full submission can be downloaded here.

The International Olympics Committee (IOC) has apologised for posting a tweet that appeared to celebrate the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games hosted by Nazi Germany.

To mark the lighting of the Olympic cauldron a year in advance of the postponed Tokyo Games, the IOC tweeted a film about the conclusion of the first-ever Olympic torch relay, when the torch entered the stadium at the Berlin Games.

The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games was used by the Nazi regime to try to sanitise its global image, hide its nascent atrocities and advance its racial ideology. The latter objective was shattered most famously by Jesse Owens, the Black American athlete who won four gold medals at the Games. At least six Jewish athletes – Samuel Balter of the United States, Gyorgy Brody, Miklos Sarkany, Karoly Karpati and Endre Kabos of Hungary and Robert Fein of Austria – also won gold medals in basketball, water polo, wrestling, fencing and weightlifting.

The IOC deleted the tweet and wrote: “We apologize to those who feel offended by the film of the Olympic Games Berlin 1936. We have deleted this film, which was part of the series of films featuring the message of unity and solidarity, from the @Olympics Twitter account.”

Avery Brundage, who led the United States’ team in the Berlin Olympics, served as President of the IOC for twenty years until 1972, and is widely considered to have been a Nazi sympathiser with racist views.

Although racist products are prohibited on Amazon, Google and Wish according to their policies, not only have neo-Nazi items been available for sale, but the platforms’ algorithms have been promoting the white supremacist merchandise.

Amazon was selling a flag with a Celtic Cross, a popular white supremacist symbol, while Wish was selling Ku Klux Klan-themed products and the page was recommending “related items”, such as a hood and a Celtic Cross.

The revelations came following an investigation by the BBC.

The companies each released a statement:

Amazon said: “The products in question are no longer available and we’ve taken action on the bad actors that offered the products and violated our policies.”

Google said: “We don’t allow ads or products that are sold on our platforms that display shocking content or promote hatred. We enforce these policies vigorously and take action when we determine they are breached.”

Wish said: “We are working hard to remove these items and taking additional steps to prevent such items appearing again.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has previously been in contact with online retailers over neo-Nazi merchandise available for sale.

The Labour Party tried to have one of the Panorama whistleblowers prosecuted, according to The Sunday Times.

Sam Matthews, a former head of governance and legal, was one of a number of former staffers turned courageous whistleblowers who featured on the BBC Panorama expose of antisemitism in the Labour Party and with whom the Party recently settled a defamation case.

It has now emerged, however, that he was also the subject of a criminal investigation instigated by Labour, which had reported him to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) for alleged data breaches.

However, the ICO has now dropped the charges, having even interviewed Mr Matthews under caution, reportedly admitting that there was no evidence to substantiate the claims.

Mr Matthews revealed in the Panorama programme that he had contemplated suicide, such was his treatment while working at Labour Party headquarters. It is extraordinary that the Labour Party, of all institutions, could have treated its workers so appallingly and then, despite praising whistleblowers in every other industry, smeared these brave former staffers because they called out Labour’s own racism.

Mr Matthews and the other claimants in the defamation case against Labour were represented by Mark Lewis, an esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Meanwhile, it has also emerged that Islington North’s Junction Ward branch of the Labour Party, in Jeremy Corbyn’s local constituency, will debate whether to reject the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The motion, brought by a member of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, also states that “We are deeply committed to opposing all forms of racism, including antisemitism. We are also deeply committed to opposing what we regard as false accusations of antisemitism.”

According to the JC, two years ago the Islington North CLP’s treasurer, Russell Smith-Becker, resigned citing Mr Corbyn’s “often tolerant” attitude toward antisemitism and worried that Labour had become “somewhere where antisemites feel comfortable and many Jews feel uncomfortable.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Football Association (FA) has banned Tom Pope for six matches and fined him £3,500 over an antisemitic Twitter post.

Earlier this year, the Port Vale striker responded to a request online to predict the course of a hypothetical Third World War. Mr Pope tweeted: “We invade Iran then Cuba then North Korea then the Rothchilds [sic] are crowned champions of every bank on the planet – the end.” The tweet has since been deleted.

After being warned by other Twitter users that his tweet could be construed as racist, he said: “I mentioned them owning the banks which is fact and now I’m facing all this,” adding: “How is it racist?? Seriously is someone out to destroy me or what?”

Port Vale then released a statement in which Mr Pope apologised.

Nevertheless, the FA investigated the incident as an ‘Aggravated Breach’ of Rule E3(2), which prohibits abusive speech with reference, whether expressed or implied, to race and/or religion and/or ethnic origin, and Mr Pope has been found to have breached the Rule.

Port Vale is expected to appeal the ruling.

Donors to an unofficial crowd-funder for Jeremy Corbyn’s legal expenses have posted horrendous comments in support of the beleaguered former Labour leader.

The crowd-funder was launched by a supporter of Mr Corbyn’s and does not appear to have his formal endorsement, however the supporter said: “The funds on this campaign will not be touched and remain on GoFundMe until the details for distribution have been established with Jeremy’s office and I will continue to provide updates as they become available.”

Not only did some donors use names like “Adolf Hitler” and “B*stard Son of Netanyahu and Starmer”, but the online activist Habibi has alerted Campaign Against Antisemitism to some of the horrendous comments that donors – including those using what appear to be their real names – have posted. Many of the comments deny Labour antisemitism under Mr Corbyn, using phrases such as “false antisemitism accusations”, “smears”, “lies”, “false”, “trumped up”, “witch-hunt” and “stitch-up”.

Other comments suggested that such accusations come from “elitist tax dodging leeches that are trying to tarnish [Mr Corbyn’s] name” or “Anglo-American oligarchs”.

There were also concerns that Mr Corbyn was being “crucified”, and equations of Zionism and Israel with racism.

Mr Corbyn will have to decide whether he wishes to accept donations from “Adolf Hitler” and other antisemitism-deniers.

The campaign, called Jeremy’s Legal Fund and hosted by GoFundMe, has so far raised hundreds of thousands of pounds.

Mr Corbyn is being sued by the journalist John Ware for defamation. Another defamation case, brought by the Jewish activist Richard Millet, is also underway.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has launched two parliamentary petitions, one calling for racists like Wiley to be stripped of their MBEs, and the other calling for the Government to bring forward Online Harms Bill this year.

Following our letter to the Cabinet Office calling for the antisemitic grime artist Wiley to be stripped of his MBE, we have launched a petition for this process to become automatic, as honours bestow credibility and prestige on individuals as a reward for bravery, achievement, or service to the UK, but some recipients later prove unworthy. To maintain confidence in the honours system, the Honours Forfeiture Committee should automatically revoke honours and deliberate in public, and its decisions be published and subject to judicial review.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333141/

A second petition has also been launched calling for new legislation urgently to introduce a requirement for technology companies to remove racist incitement within set timeframes, a duty of care for social networks with personal liability for executives, and tighter requirements to provide evidence to police under warrant.

The petition can be signed here: https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/333146/

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “From their pitiful responses to the hate spewed daily on their platforms, it is evident that social media companies will stop at nothing to make a profit. It is time for these deeply damaging and irresponsible companies to be held accountable for the hatred they help to spread. Antisemites are able to use these platforms to reach millions and by failing to act on anti-Jewish incitement technology companies are enabling it. Social networks are allowing racism to run rampant and it is high time they were regulated like all other mass media.”

Following Wiley’s antisemitic rampage, more than 700 musicians and members of the music industry have signed a letter decrying racism.

Among the signatories were Alexandra Burke, Biffy Clyro, Clean Bandit, Dougie Poynter, Labrinth, Lewis Capaldi, Little Mix, James Blunt, Jess Glynne, Naighty Boy, Nao, Niall Horan, Nile Rodgers, Olly Murs, Rita Ora, and The 1975.

The letter was also signed by the heads of EMI, Universal Music UK, Warner Music UK, and Sony Music UK, and numerous songwriters, producers, managers, publishers and lawyers from the music industry.

In the letter, the signatories wrote: “We representatives of the music industry write to express our determination that love, unity and friendship, not division and hatred, must and will always be our common cause.

“In recent months anti-black racists and antisemites, plus those who advocate Islamophobia, xenophobia, homophobia and transphobia, have repeatedly demonstrated that they want us all to fail.

“Whether it be systemic racism and racial inequality highlighted by police brutality in America or anti-Jewish racism promulgated through online attacks, the result is the same: suspicion, hatred and division. We are at our worst when we attack one another.

“Music brings joy and hope and connects us all. We stand together to wipe out racism.”

The letter comes after the grime artist Wiley delivered an unrepentant multi-day antisemitic rant on any social media platform he could find.

Last week, Campaign Against Antisemitism wrote to the Ivors Academy calling to Wiley to be stripped of his 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award. We have also called for Wiley to be prosecuted and to lose his MBE.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been informed by Google that it has decided to ban Wiley from YouTube. He was using his channel to broadcast disturbing videos to almost 250,000 followers. It had initially refused to remove him, but Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully appealed the decision.

The performer, who was finally banned from TwitterFacebook and Instagram following worldwide outrage, had been uploading further videos to his popular YouTube channel.

The videos continued in the same vein as his previous videos and his recent interviews with Sky News and The Voice, a newspaper for the black community, in which he reaffirmed his belief in antisemitic conspiracy theories and bigoted stereotypes about Jews.

For example, in one of the new videos, Wiley demanded that an unspecified “you”, which appears from the context to refer to Jews in general, try taking his passport away so that Wiley can see quite how much power the unnamed “you” has.

In another video, he read the name of a Twitter user and demanded to know whether she is a Jew.

In yet another video, he said that he had to “throw myself on the bonfire” to show his audience and “draw everything out — you saw it”.

The videos attracted many thousands of views, and comments posted beneath them were vehemently antisemitic.

Google initially decided to remove only one video, which it said was antisemitic, but not the ones cited above.

Following an appeal by Campaign Against Antisemitism, Google has now reversed its position and banned Wiley from the platform entirely.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Following contact between Campaign Against Antisemitism and Google, Wiley has now been banned from YouTube. This should have happened faster but we are pleased that this now means that Wiley can no longer incite antisemitism on any of the major social media platforms and has lost the ability to broadcast his hatred to the hundreds of thousands of people who followed him.

“It is extremely important to us that Wiley is held to account for his actions, which is why we are in touch with the Metropolitan Police Service to ensure that he is prosecuted and the Cabinet Office to ensure that he is stripped of his MBE.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson, has published an unhinged conspiracy theory article and video claiming that “Zionists” and Campaign Against Antisemitism control the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in service to the Conservative Party.

Mr Williamson, who was suspended from the Labour Party several times before running as an Independent in the 2019 General Election and receiving so few votes that, extraordinarily for an incumbent MP, he lost his deposit, has been embroiled in controversy over comments about Jews, “Zionists” and antisemitism for a long time.

Mr Williamson claims in the article and video, titled “Unmasking the EHRC”, that “over the last few years, we’ve seen how the Commission’s lack of independence has led to its purpose being perverted in order to attack the British Left, Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters” and ludicrously asserts that “the number of antisemitism cases in the Labour Party are miniscule”.

In a more sinister vein, however, he claims that these cases “were clearly exaggerated as part of a pernicious smear campaign against Corbyn and his supporters”. Such comments are in line with Mr Williamson’s tradition of calling attempts to address antisemitism in the Labour Party “smears”, thereby accusing Jews of acting in bad faith when they complain about anti-Jewish racism.

Mr Williamson’s particular interest in the EHRC is due to the full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party launched by the independent body in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant. He believes that the EHRC has become part of the ‘smear campaign’, although he seems conflicted as to whether this is because it is staffed or manipulated by “racists” and “Zionists” or is simply doing the bidding of the Conservative Party.

Mr Williamson accuses the EHRC of racism and inappropriate closeness to the New Labour Government in its early years and now the Conservative Government. Both claims have been made in recent months by the far-left in a desperate attempt to undermine the EHRC in advance of its report on Labour antisemitism.

Mr Williamson describes the “so-called” Campaign Against Antisemitism as an “anti-Corbyn, pro-Israel outfit,” and claims that the EHRC was conflicted because its Chief Executive’s husband is a trustee of a charity which once made a donation to us. In order to buttress claims of a conspiracy, Mr Williamson claims that this donation was received in 2016, well into Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, implying that it was part of a concerted effort to target the Labour leader for partisan reasons. In reality, the donation was pledged and received in 2015 and was ring-fenced for a specific polling project that had already been carried out at the beginning of that year, months before the 2015 General Election and well before anyone, including Mr Williamson, could have imagined that Mr Corbyn would become leader of the Labour Party.

The donation was made because – hard as this may be for Mr Williamson to imagine – there are people who acknowledge that antisemitism exists in Britain, and because – doubtless even more incomprehensible to Mr Williamson – there are some people who want to tackle it. Sometimes reality is not as conspiratorial as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion might have people like Mr Williamson believe.

Perhaps if Mr Williamson had requested comment from us – as would be expected when someone is publishing controversial accusations – he would have learned this. But in the world of sinister conspiracy theories, evidence is an avoidable inconvenience.

The video and article are the product of the Campaign For Chris Williamson Limited, a company whose sole director is the conspiratorial Bristol University academic, David Miller. Dr Miller, who was suspended from the Labour Party before quitting, has been accused in the past of making Jewish students deeply uncomfortable, including after accusing the “Zionist movement” of being one of the “five pillars” of hatred of Muslims in a lecture.

Mr Williamson, seemingly under the tutelage of Dr Miller, seems to believe that there is a “Zionist movement” in which some Jewish organisations are “formal member[s]” and some are not. One would have to excavate the over-extended minds of Mr Williamson and Dr Miller to discover how an organisation is able to join this movement and what – other than supposedly controlling British politics and targeting Muslims – the movement does. While Mr Williamson’s offensive ignorance of the Jewish community is entirely unsurprising, Dr Miller parades his as academic research, and Bristol University appallingly continues to tolerate his doing so.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Chris Williamson destroyed his political career by backing antisemites within the Labour Party and claiming that they were merely the victims of a ‘witch hunt’ which he likened to the oppression of East German citizens by the Stasi.

“Now, fearing that his apologism for and defence of antisemites is about to be fulsomely unmasked by the EHRC, he has launched this unhinged attack claiming that the EHRC is in fact run by a ‘Zionist’ conspiracy on behalf of the Conservative Party, even attacking our charity as we are the complainant in the EHRC’s investigation.

“This latest attack contains no interesting revelations about the EHRC, but it does open a fascinating window into the deranged conspiracy-theory-addled mind of Mr Williamson.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Action by Campaign Against Antisemitism has resulted in new criminal charges against the notorious antisemite Alison Chabloz.

Ms Chabloz is a virulent antisemite and Holocaust denier who has an extensive record of using social media to publicise her hatred for Jews and to convert others to her views about Jewish people.

Following a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was later continued by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Ms Chabloz became the first person in Britain to be convicted over Holocaust denial in a precedent-setting case.

Ms Chabloz is fixated on the idea that the Holocaust did not occur, and that it was fabricated by Jews and their supporters as a vehicle for fraudulently extorting money in the form of reparations. This forms the basis for her second obsession, that Jews are liars and thieves who are working to undermine Western society. Ms Chabloz is also connected to extremist right-wing movements, at whose meetings she gives speeches and performs her songs, in the UK, France and North America. 

The three new charges under section 127 of the Communications Act relate to two internet radio broadcasts featuring Ms Chabloz.

On 1st July 2019, we have alleged that Ms Chabloz was a guest on The Graham Hart Show, an internet radio show, with Graham Hart and Brian Smyth, both of whom are far-right extremists with antisemitic views. Mr Hart, who admits to admiring Hitler, was arrested in May following the presentation of evidence to the police by Campaign Against Antisemitism. During the show, Ms Chabloz said that “the police and the lower ranks, they will never get anywhere unless they become members of the local Freemason lodge, and that is basically the same as becoming a member of the synagogue”, and that “the Jews, they need to stop indoctrinating their children, you know their grandparents were gassed just because they were Jews. No wonder they grow up into psychotic maniacs. They are indoctrinated from birth with this bulls***, and they’ve been doing the same for centuries, even before the Holocaust. But the Holocaust is how most Jews identify themselves. That is the central pillar of Jewishness now, it’s the Holocaust: ‘Oh, we suffered so much’.”

On 5th May 2019, we have alleged Ms Chabloz was a guest on The Realist Report, an internet radio show hosted by John Friend, an American white-nationalist, antisemite and Holocaust-denier. During the show, in which Mr Friend endorsed Hitler’s treatment of European Jews, Ms Chabloz promoted the antisemitic conspiracy theory that the Jews control anything worth controlling; accused the Jewish people of inventing the Holocaust in order to profit financially; suggested that Hitler’s treatment of European Jews was caused by bad Jewish behaviour; insisted that there was nothing wrong with saying ‘Hitler was right’; claimed that the judge who convicted her had been intimidated by the ‘Jewish lobby’; and argued that Jews who did not conform to her idea of a member of Western society should be deported.

A trial date has not yet been set.

Earlier this year, an investigation instigated following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism found that Ms Chabloz had falsely claimed that a court officer – who was horrified to hear the allegation – had agreed with her vile antisemitic views.

Last year, Ms Chabloz had her application for a judicial review denied by the High Court following her landmark conviction on three charges of sending grossly offensive communications via a public communications network. That case began as a private prosecution by Campaign Against Antisemitism, which was then continued by the CPS. The charges related to three self-penned songs in which Ms Chabloz denounced a supposed Jewish conspiracy to dominate the world and attacked the Holocaust as a fraud perpetrated by Jews for financial gain. The conviction set a new precedent in British law, effectively delivering a landmark precedent verdict on incitement on social media and on whether the law considers Holocaust denial to be “grossly offensive” and therefore illegal when used as a means by which to hound Jews.

Ms Chabloz has also been banned from entering France, where Holocaust denial is illegal, for forty years until 2059.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are pleased to see that the CPS is moving on these actionable offences committed by a notorious and unrepentant antisemite following action by Campaign Against Antisemitism. If Alison Chabloz continues to pile up convictions with no punitive impact or remedial effect on her behaviour, that is a mockery of justice. If convicted of these charges, Ms Chabloz must face a sentence with real teeth if the criminal justice system wishes to deter others from following her odious example.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for the Labour Party and the Co-operative Party MP Barry Sheerman to lose both parties’ whip over a tweet posted this morning.

Mr Sheerman, who has been the MP for Huddersfield since 1979 tweeted: “Apparently there has been a bit of a run on silver shekels!” After Twitter users asked what he was talking about, he posted another tweet, seemingly referring to the first, saying: “Apparently Richard Desmond & Philip Green were on the original list for seats in the House of Lords!”

As Twitter users denounced him, Mr Sheerman later deleted the tweets and instead tweeted, hours later: “I apologise for my earlier tweet. I did not intend the meaning which has upset many, and I am very sorry for the upset and offense I have caused. I will think more carefully in future and will reflect on this…I have fought antisemitism all my political life & have been a Labour Friend of Israel since joining as a student at the LSE I am deeply sorry that my clumsy tweet has caused offence.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Barry Sheerman’s first reaction on hearing that two prominent Jewish businessmen supposedly missed out on peerages is to think about ‘silver shekels’, alluding in one fell swoop to both classic and modern antisemitic tropes about Jews corrupting politics with money and being more loyal to Israel than their own countries.

“Mr Sheerman must immediately face disciplinary proceedings and lose the whip of both the Labour and Co-operative Parties. Sir Keir Starmer also has a more fundamental question to answer about his parliamentary party: how long are Labour MPs capable of going without making brazenly antisemitic statements? Labour’s antisemitism problem apparently goes well beyond the Party’s far-left contingent.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Independent Doctors Federation hosted Prof. John Ashton earlier this week, despite the public health expert’s long history of antisemitic comments.

Prof. Ashton’s record includes comparing Israel to the Nazis and holding Jews responsible for the actions of the State of Israel, both of which are breaches of the International Definition of Antisemitism, as well as trolling Jewish women MPs.

The Independent Doctors Federation describes itself as the leading membership organisation representing Independent medical practitioners in the UK for both specialists and general practitioners.

It is likely that the Federation was unaware of Prof. Ashton’s views when he was invited and hosted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is grateful to one of the members of the Federation who brought the event to our attention.

After thousands signed our petition calling on the BBC, ITV and Sky News to stop featuring Prof. Ashton on their programmes, Prof. Ashton appears to have had fewer bookings by major broadcasters.

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on all decent organisations and individuals to shun Prof. Ashton until he makes amends for his history of anti-Jewish racism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

John Ware, the maker of the BBC Panorama documentary “Is Labour Antisemitic”, is reportedly commencing legal proceedings against two members of the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL).

Naomi Wimbourne-Idrissi, one of the group’s founders, and web officer Richard Kuper, will join Jeremy Corbyn as defendants in separate libel actions by Mr Ware.

It is understood that the libel action concerns comments made by Ms Wimbourne-Idrissi on the radio, in which she claimed that Mr Ware allegedly had a “terrible record of Islamophobia, far-right politics” and that the BBC had in the past had to “apologise” for his journalism and discipline him. The claims were then repeated on the JVL website. Mr Ware denies the claims.

JVL confirmed they it was “defending” a libel action against two of its officers.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Mr Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party.

Recently, the Labour Party reached a settlement with Mr Ware and the whistleblowers featured in the programme over alleged libels made by the Party during the show that questioned the motives of the claimants.

Mr Ware’s cases have been brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A senior volunteer at Campaign Against Antisemitism has written on our behalf to the Ivors Academy calling for it to rescind Wiley’s 2019 Ivors Inspiration Award.

In his letter, Joe Glasman, an award-winning composer, Ivors member and former Ivors award panellist, noted that Wiley has “spent the last several days on an antisemitic tirade” and wrote that it would be “untenable for an individual who holds such horrific antisemitic views to continue to be held up as worthy of such an award by the Academy, an honour bestowed specifically upon those whom the Academy considers to be inspirational role models for composers and young artists.”

Mr Glasman went on to note that the Academy is “rightly dedicated to diversity, equality and inclusivity” but that this means that the Academy “must be a safe space for all minorities, and that includes Jews.”

Mr Glasman observed that he could not remain a member of the Academy if it fails to revoke Wiley’s award, but expressed confidence that Ivors would make the right decision.

The full letter can be read below.

Twitter has permanently banned the former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard, David Duke, from its platform.

Mr Duke has a long history of vile antisemitic views and is a prominent white supremacist.

Twitter’s decision comes a month after YouTube banned the far-right racist. It also comes after a global walkout from Twitter earlier this week to protest its failure to address antisemitic hatred on its website.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Twitter has done the right thing by banning arch antisemite and prominent racist David Duke. But why on earth has it taken this long? Yet again Twitter has been slow to act on cases that are not remotely borderline. However, if the 48-hour global boycott earlier this week has brought about a culture change at Twitter, that is to be welcomed, and hopefully the former Grand Wizard is only the first of many Jew-haters to be booted from Twitter.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has been informed by Google that it has decided to remove only one video from Wiley’s YouTube channel, from which he continues to broadcast disturbing videos to almost 250,000 followers.

The performer, who has was finally banned from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following worldwide outrage, is now uploading further videos to a small Instagram account that appears to be new, and his popular YouTube channel.

The videos continue in the same vein as his previous videos and his recent interviews with Sky News and The Voice, a newspaper for the black community, in which he reaffirmed his belief in antisemitic conspiracy theories and bigoted stereotypes about Jews.

For example, in one of the new videos, Wiley demands that an unspecified “you”, which appears from the context to refer to Jews in general, try taking his passport away so that Wiley can see quite how much power the unnamed “you” has.

In another video, he reads the name of a Twitter user and demands to know whether she is a Jew.

In yet another video, he says that he had to “throw myself on the bonfire” to show his audience and “draw everything out — you saw it”.

The videos have already attracted many thousands of views, and comments posted beneath them are vehemently antisemitic.

Google has decided to remove one video, which it said was antisemitic, but not the ones cited above. Google will also revoke Wiley’s monetisation privileges.

A spokesperson for Google told Campaign Against Antisemitism: “Hate speech and content that promotes hate against religious groups is strictly prohibited on YouTube. We’ve worked hard to develop responsible and universal Community Guidelines that make clear what content is unacceptable on our platform, and we enforce our policies consistently, and regardless of viewpoint.”

We are now appealing the decision following failed talks with Google’s management in the UK. Campaign Against Antisemitism has until now had good relations with Google and acts as a ‘trusted flagger’, helping to highlight antisemitic material on YouTube.

Hundreds of thousands of people joined the #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate boycott of Twitter and Instagram. We had hoped that social media companies might have learned from this, but Google’s decision to allow Wiley to continue to broadcast his disturbing messages to hundreds of thousands of his followers on YouTube shows that Google is just as bad as the rest.

We are concerned that his fans could be inspired to act on Wiley’s hateful broadcasts. That is why we have asked social networks to take him off air, and reported Wiley to the police and intend to privately prosecute him should the authorities refuse to act. This underlines how urgent it is that the Government legislates to regulate these deeply irresponsible companies.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are aghast. Today is Tisha B’Av, one of the saddest day of the Jewish calendar, when we remember past persecution of the Jewish people. Today of all days, an appalling antisemite who was banned from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following a global campaign, has shown up on YouTube to continue broadcasting, and Google has decided to defend him.

“Google is acting as though Wiley has not spent the past week spewing antisemitic conspiracy theories to hundreds of thousands of people using every social media platform available to him. He has called for Jews to be shot, for a ‘war’ against Jews, and said that Jews are rich exploiters, slavers, cheats, thieves and cowards. He has even claimed that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters, drawing on the same conspiracy theory whose believers have tormented Jews in London and murdered Jews in the states of New Jersey and New York.

“Google is behaving dangerously and sending a clear message that it provides a safe space for Jew-hate. Google’s failure to act will not go unanswered. It is now the last bastion for this appalling antisemite. We have appealed the decision following failed talks with Google’s management in the UK and hope that the company will now see sense.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Online Monitoring and Investigations Unit is aware that Wiley, who has was finally banned from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following worldwide outrage, is now uploading disturbing videos to a small Instagram account that appears to be new, and a YouTube channel with almost 250,000 followers.

The videos continue in the same vein as his previous videos and his recent interviews with Sky News and The Voice, a newspaper for the black community, in which he reaffirmed his belief in antisemitic conspiracy theories and bigoted stereotypes about Jews.

For example, in one of the new videos, Wiley demands that an unspecified “you”, which appears from the context to refer to Jews in general, try taking his passport away so that Wiley can see quite how much power Jews have.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Facebook and Google, which own Instagram and YouTube, have been made aware of Wiley’s latest attempts to use their platforms to broadcast his appalling views. We have discussed this with them and asked that they urgently close down his remaining accounts. Wiley seems to be on a quest to discredit himself even further and to persuade his audience to hate Jews and even to go to ‘war’ with Jews. His musical career is undoubtedly over, but we are concerned that his fans could be inspired to act on his hateful broadcasts. That is why we have asked social networks to take him off air, and reported Wiley to the police and intend to privately prosecute him should the authorities refuse to act.”

The Voice newspaper must apologise for its disastrous interview with Wiley that failed to distinguish between reporting on antisemitism and enabling it.

In his interview, Wiley doubled down on his previous social media comments, describing Jews as rich exploiters and slavers, using classic antisemitic tropes and generalising about an entire ethnic group following an apparent dispute with his management team.

But rather than challenge Wiley’s views, the interviewer, Joel Campbell, suggested that there might be ‘salient’ points in Wiley’s racist ranting and seemed to affirm the idea that the Jewish community has a ‘stranglehold’ on the black community. The article also failed convincingly to dispute Wiley’s unfounded and antisemitic claims that Jews are rich exploiters and slavers.

The article’s commentary was also unacceptable. “There is no way to put this all in one nutshell but the hypothesis that you need to get a Jewish lawyer in order to progress in the music business may be a complete fallacy (I haven’t done the numbers, looking into the correlation in respect of who is and isn’t successful with or without one), but yet it remains,” Campbell wrote, adding: “I’ve never seen anyone Jewish refute or confirm this (maybe there was never a need felt to do so), but maybe, it’s a discussion that needs to be had?”

The notion that artists from the black community require a Jewish lawyer to advance is not “a discussion that needs to be had”. If anything, a discussion needs to be had about how The Voice could possibly have published such a disastrous article about such a sensitive topic. There is a difference between reporting on Wiley’s antisemitism and enabling and amplifying it. The Voice’s article was very much on the wrong side of that line.

Wiley had spent the last several days spewing antisemitic bile on social media before being locked out of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram following a global #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign and mass 48-hour social media boycott. Wiley’s comments were condemned by the Prime Minister, the Home Secretary, politicians from across parties, celebrities and many others.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “In its interview with Wiley, The Voice newspaper repeatedly played down Wiley’s antisemitism, suggesting that there might be ‘salient points’ hidden within his racist ranting and seeming to affirm the idea that the Jewish community has a ‘stranglehold’ on the black community, not to mention failing convincingly to dispute Wiley’s unfounded and antisemitic claims that Jews are rich exploiters and slavers. There is a difference between reporting on racism and enabling it. The Voice was firmly on the wrong side of that line. It must apologise and explain how it managed to get such a sensitive topic so dreadfully wrong.

“Now that Wiley’s career as a performer is over and the social networks have finally stopped him from spewing hatred online, he must be stripped of his MBE and prosecuted. The message from the criminal justice system must be clear that those who incite racial hatred will face the full force of the law. Should the authorities fail to act, we stand ready to take our own legal action.”

Various other figures have weighed in on the article as well.Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for the revocation of Wiley’s MBE and for him to be prosecuted for incitement to racial hatred.

The antisemitic grime artist Wiley has given incendiary interviews to Sky News and The Voice Online.

Wiley has spent the last several days spewing antisemitic bile on social media before being locked out of TwitterFacebook and Instagram following a global #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign and mass 48-hour social media boycott, in which Campaign Against Antisemitism participated.

Wiley’s comments were condemned by the Prime Minister, the Home Secretary, politicians from across parties, celebrities and many others.

In his interviews, Wiley doubled down on his previous comments, describing Jews as rich exploiters and slavers, using classic antisemitic tropes and generalising about an entire ethnic group following an apparent dispute with his management team. Nevertheless, the intensity of Wiley’s vitriol and some of the conspiracy theories he espoused indicate that these are longstanding beliefs that have incubated over time, rather than comments arising from the moment.

In a depressing passage in The Voice Online article, the interviewer explained that he had set out “to find out what had triggered [Wiley’s] outburst and why he would make such sweeping generalisations against a community of people in such a scathing manner. These questions were not being posed from an ignorant perspective, some of the views espoused by Wiley are the great unsaid outside of the black community.”

The notion that Wiley’s views may be widespread in some communities is deeply concerning.

The writer went on to say: “Putting anything remotely near considered antisemitic to one side of course, in fact out the window in the bin, not too many seem prepared to vocalise their consternation for some of the recurring themes Wiley believes is the stranglehold one community seems to have over another in particular relation but not confined to, the music business.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Wiley appears to be on a quest to destroy his career and reputation completely. He has passed up opportunity after opportunity to genuinely apologise. Instead of showing genuine contrition or a morsel of self-awareness after a weekend of racist ranting online, including calling for a “war” against Jews, Wiley still appears to be convinced that he is the real victim.

“Now that his career as a performer is over and the social networks have finally stopped him from spewing hatred online, he must be stripped of his MBE and prosecuted. The message from the criminal justice system must be clear that those who incite racial hatred will face the full force of the law. Should the authorities fail to act, we stand ready to take our own legal action.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for the revocation of Wiley’s MBE and for him to be prosecuted for incitement to racial hatred.

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently visited Twitter’s London headquarters to shine a light on racism.

Jeremy Corbyn has deleted a past tweet exchange with the grime artist Wiley, who has become embroiled in controversy over an extended antisemitic rant.

Wiley, whose real name is Richard Kylea Cowie Jr., appears to have shown support for the former Labour leader, who thanked him for his endorsement.

However, with Wiley now at the centre of his own antisemitism scandal, Mr Corbyn, whose tenure as Labour leader was marked by the Party’s institutional antisemitism, has apparently deleted the tweet, but has not issued any statement explaining why or condemning Wiley’s antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Jeremy Corbyn has not found time to express a shred of solidarity with the Jewish community even as #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate became Twitter’s top trending hashtag, but he has found time to cover his own tracks. Mr Corbyn’s deletion of his positive Twitter exchange with Wiley without any statement condemning his antisemitism suggests that he is acting purely out of self-interest to try to protect the shards of his shattered reputation as a supposed ‘anti-racist’.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism recently called for Mr Corbyn to be suspended from Labour after he made a conspiratorial statement about a legal settlement reached between Labour and former staffers turned whistleblowers.

Mr Corbyn has a long history of antisemitism controversies implicating him directly, and over 57,000 people signed our petition denouncing him as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Twitter has permanently deleted antisemitic performer Wiley’s account. They did so following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism under immense pressure amid a worldwide 48-hour boycott of Twitter under the hashtag #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate.

Last night, Campaign Against Antisemitism went to Twitter’s London headquarters to shine a light on the company after it failed so spectacularly to address racist incitement on its platform.

Numerous examples of antisemitic tweets were projected onto Twitter’s building in an effort to embarrass Twitter into cleaning up the mess that it has enabled and allowed to fester online.

The video can be watched here.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Following discussions with Campaign Against Antisemitism, during which we made clear that the beginning of their path to building faith would be the removal of Wiley’s account, this morning Twitter has finally listened. The closure of Wiley’s account is too little too late, but it is at least a start for this deeply irresponsible social network.

“After Twitter’s abysmal response to blatant anti-Jewish incitement on its platform, last night we decided to literally shine a light on the company and project onto its London headquarters some of the hateful tweets that Twitter permits on its platform.

“From their pitiful responses to the hate spewed daily on their platforms, it is evident that social media companies will stop at nothing to make a profit. It is time for these deeply damaging and irresponsible companies to be held accountable for the hatred they help to spread.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others walked out from Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for 48 hours from Monday morning as part of a #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign following the social media platforms’ failure to take appropriate action against racism on their websites.

It has taken Facebook several days, but it has finally made the decision to ban Wiley from Facebook and Instagram (which is owned by Facebook), soon after Campaign Against Antisemitism publicised Facebook’s private damage control outreach to advertisers.

In a statement, Facebook said: “There is no place for hate speech on Facebook and Instagram. After initially placing Wiley’s accounts in a seven-day block, we have now removed both his Facebook and Instagram accounts for repeated violations of our policies.”

It is unclear whether Wiley will be able to open new accounts in future, without any assurance or evidence that he will refrain from racist incitement.

Twitter, however, has so far failed to ban Wiley from its platform for any longer than seven days, despite the rapper’s antisemitic rant having begun on Twitter and only later moved to Instagram and Facebook.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Although it took Facebook several days to reach the right decision, it has now banned Wiley from its platforms. Twitter, however, has yet to do so, despite Wiley having launched his antisemitic tirade on that platform. All eyes are now on Twitter, which evidently still values profit over decency. Twitter has disgraced itself in failing to take responsibility and act against antisemitism but it can still follow Facebook in belatedly making the right decision to ban Wiley for his unrepentant racist incitement.

“It is a lamentable state of affairs that it takes a 48-hour global boycott of social media to convince Twitter and Facebook to take the most elementary action against someone using their platforms to call for Jews to be shot. Twitter’s performance over the past few days has been beyond abysmal. Nobody makes a better case for regulation of social media than the technology companies themselves.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others have walked out from Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for 48 hours as part of a #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign following the social media platforms’ failure to take appropriate action against racism on their websites.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

Facebook has sent a message to advertisers, the Government and NGOs in a desperate bid to stem rising backlash over its failure to delete antisemitic performer Wiley’s Instagram messages.

The e-mail from Steve Hatch, Facebook’s Vice-President for Northern Europe, which we have reproduced in full below, sought to justify the steps that Facebook has taken, but even as the e-mail was sent, Wiley continued to post prolifically on Facebook.

So far it appears that Facebook has done little more than to remove several of Wiley’s antisemitic posts and enforce a block on his official Instagram account for 7 days (Facebook owns Instagram).

In its statement, Facebook said that “No one at Facebook finds this type of content and behaviour anything other than abhorrent.”

The statement explained that after Wiley’s posts were reported to it, its teams investigated and gathered “contextual advice from our partners who represent the Jewish community. Their partnership and expertise is invaluable in understanding the nuances of antisemitic language.”

It added that “Our dedicated law enforcement engagement team was also made aware that a criminal report had been made to the Metropolitan Police,” after Campaign Against Antisemitism made a complaint to the Metropolitan Police regarding Wiley’s posts.

Facebook continued: “These initial investigations led us to remove a number of posts from Wiley’s Instagram account. Generally, the first time we remove a user’s post we let them know why they broke our guidelines as we think it’s important they have the opportunity to learn from their mistakes. But in common with many platforms, on Facebook and Instagram if a user repeatedly breaks our rules we take a series of further enforcement actions. These can range from different types of restrictions on their activity to a total removal of their account. We have enforced this policy numerous times globally and locally regarding hate speech including the suspension and subsequent removal of numerous UK organizations and individuals from our platforms.”

Facebook says that it continued its investigations over the course of Saturday 25th July and “removed further pieces of content that violated our hate speech guidelines, subsequently placing his account in a 7 day block.”

“We absolutely recognize,” Facebook concluded, “that we always have more work to do in tackling complex and evolving situations like this one. Hate speech has no place on our platforms and we will continue to update you on how we evolve our approaches and policies to counter it.”

The full e-mail is reproduced below.

Incredibly, even as this update was disseminated to advertisers, Wiley has continued to rant on his Facebook account, including against high-profile Jewish individuals, with no consequences. Facebook has yet to take any action against these posts and this account.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Facebook is in panic mode as it realises it can longer hide from the consequences of its promotion of racist Jew-hatred on its platforms. But even as it seeks to assure advertisers that it is taking action against behaviour on Instagram that it considers ‘abhorrent’, it is allowing that behaviour to continue on Facebook.

“Despite all the media attention that this story has received, Wiley has still been able to maintain his Facebook account and continue posting from it. There is evidently no depth to which a user can sink before Facebook decides to put human decency before profit.

“In its statement, Facebook is trying to claim that it has done enough against Wiley’s account, but it has not taken long for reality to catch up and betray the company’s failure to take hate seriously.

“Advertisers would be wise to think twice about whether to associate their brands with corporate enablers of racism, and the Government must take action to bring an end to the culture of impunity at social media companies.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism and others have walked out from Twitter, Instagram and Facebook for 48 hours as part of a #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign following the social media platforms’ failure to take appropriate action against racism on their websites.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

Facebook’s e-mail to advertisers in full

Good afternoon.

I wanted to update you about the actions Facebook has taken following the antisemitic posts on Instagram by UK artist Wiley this weekend, which have now included removing a number of posts and enforcing a seven day block on this account. I am also setting out some further details of our broader approach to preventing and tackling hate speech on our platforms. We are sending the same communications both to our partners in Government and NGOs.

If you or any of your teams would like to discuss over VC in more detail over the coming days please do let me know.

Best wishes,

Steve

No one at Facebook finds this type of content and behaviour anything other than abhorrent.

We currently work with a number of anti-hate speech NGOs representing the Jewish community who advise us on our policies, and help us to deliver education programmes off and on our platforms. Our partners are also able to report content that concerns them directly to us, often providing invaluable additional context that can help us enforce our rules.

Late Friday night, one of our partners contacted us regarding recent posts on Instagram from the account of the UK artist Wiley. Following the temporary suspension of his Twitter account, Wiley began to post similar content about Jewish people on his Instagram account. This included screenshots of posts that had been deleted from Twitter, and a series of videos. 

We have trained teams who handle reports of hate speech content, and this includes those who specialize in the way hate is expressed against different communities, and team members with specific knowledge of the UK context. Immediately after the report at around 11pm on Friday 24th July, our dedicated teams began to investigate the posts from Wiley. 

As part of this investigation, we continued to gather expert contextual advice from our partners who represent the Jewish community. Their partnership and expertise is invaluable in understanding the nuances of antisemitic language. Our dedicated law enforcement engagement team was also made aware that a criminal report had been made to the Metropolitan Police. We work closely with the Met in situations such as this one, and our team stands ready to provide any assistance that we can.

These initial investigations led us to remove a number of posts from Wiley’s Instagram account. Generally, the first time we remove a user’s post we let them know why they broke our guidelines as we think it’s important they have the opportunity to learn from their mistakes. But in common with many platforms, on Facebook and Instagram if a user repeatedly breaks our rules we take a series of further enforcement actions. These can range from different types of restrictions on their activity to a total removal of their account. We have enforced this policy numerous times globally and locally regarding hate speech including the suspension and subsequent removal of numerous UK organizations and individuals from our platforms.

Over the course of Saturday 25th July, Wiley’s activity on Twitter led him to receive a further suspension from that platform for seven days. From this point on Saturday morning, his use of Instagram to post videos increased significantly. During this time we continued our investigations into his posts, and removed further pieces of content that violated our hate speech guidelines, subsequently placing his account in a seven day block. This means the user is not able to log in for seven days, and subsequently cannot post or message other users. That block was put in place just over 24 hours from the first report from our partners. The account will continue to be monitored and its content reviewed.

I hope that you will find this update today useful. We absolutely recognize that we always have more work to do in tackling complex and evolving situations like this one. Hate speech has no place on our platforms and we will continue to update you on how we evolve our approaches and policies to counter it.

Steve Hatch
VP | Northern Europe

A crowdfunder launched to raise money for Jeremy Corbyn’s legal defence has received money from donors calling themselves “Adolf Hitler” and “B*stard Son of Netanyahu and Starmer”.

The crowdfunder was launched by a supporter of Mr Corbyn’s and does not appear to have his formal endorsement, however the supporter said: “The funds on this campaign will not be touched and remain on GoFundMe until the details for distribution have been established with Jeremy’s office and I will continue to provide updates as they become available.”

Other donors also used provocative names or left offensive comments, such as ‘Jack T’, who claimed that Mr Corbyn had been targeted by “people within the Labour Party working on behalf of the racist State of Israel”.

Another complained: “We love Jeremy Corbyn and he is all we got! Him being seen and propagated by reich wing media and portrayed like he can be the next S***ler is absurd beyond belief [sic].”

The campaign, called Jeremy’s Legal Fund and hosted by GoFundMe, has so far raised over £300,000.

Mr Corbyn is being sued by the journalist John Ware for defamation. Another defamation case, brought by the Jewish activist Richard Millet, is also underway.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: ““Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, the Labour Party became institutionally anti-Semitic, driving Labour’s own workers to defy their own Party and blow the whistle on the Jew-hatred within it. It was Mr Corbyn’s senior team that directed a forceful effort to drag the whistleblowers’ names through the mud, in some cases driving them to the point of considering suicide. Instead of apologising inshore for the attempts to bully and silence these principled whistleblowers, Mr Corbyn has now attacked the Labour Party for apologising to them.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Prime Minister has spoken out against Wiley’s antisemitism, calling it “abhorrent”, and declared that Twitter’s response was “not good enough”.

A spokesperson for Boris Johnson said: “The Prime Minister would echo the comments of the Home Secretary yesterday that the antisemitic posts by Wiley are abhorrent. The Prime Minister would also echo the Home Secretary’s comments that this material should not have been able to remain on Twitter and Instagram for so long.”

The spokesman added that “social media companies need to go much further and faster in removing hateful comment such as this” and that “the message is clear: Twitter needs to do better on this.”

The comments come after Home Secretary Priti Patel also said: “The antisemitic posts from Wiley are abhorrent. They should not have been able to remain on Twitter and Instagram for so long and I have asked them for a full explanation. Social media companies must act much faster to remove such appalling hatred from their platforms.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has joined others in walking out of Twitter and other social media platforms for 48 hours.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

You can keep up with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s updates during the walkout at antisemitism.org/news or by subscribing to our e-mail updates and switching them from weekly updates to daily updates.

A leaked email from a senior Corbyn ally in Labour Party headquarters shows that he recognised that a controversial leaked report about the Party’s handling of antisemitism was misleading and that there may be adverse consequences following its dissemination.

Thomas Gardiner, who resigned a few weeks ago as Labour’s Director of Governance and Legal, is reported to have sent an email on 11th April to the Party’s General-Secretary saying that the report on Labour’s handling of antisemitism ought not to be circulated because emails and WhatsApp messages from Party staffers had been “presented selectively and without their true context in order to give a misleading picture.”

An unredacted version of the 851-page report was nevertheless leaked, giving rise to potential date breach claims that may cost the Labour Party millions of pounds in legal costs.

In his email, Mr Gardiner expressed concern that the report would “lay false blame” on him, that searches of staffers’ email accounts, including his own, were “not authorised” and “improper” and that use of confidential WhatsApp messages represented “a clear and unacceptable breach of confidence,” adding: “Further, these messages are presented selectively and without their true context in order to give a misleading picture.”

Although the report had by then been leaked, Mr Gardiner said “I realise it will not be helpful not to further use the report, given that it has apparently been leaked in a previous version, but I must register this formal objection.”

The report, which Campaign Against Antisemitism described at the time as “a desperate last-ditch attempt to deflect and discredit allegations of antisemitism”, was originally compiled for submission to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). On advice from Labour’s lawyers, the Party has not submitted the report to the EHRC.

The EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Ms Formby has released a statement saying that the searches of staff email and social media accounts were authorised and were carried out in response to requests by the EHRC. Other allies of Mr Corbyn’s have reportedly claimed that Mr Gardiner had supported the compilation and publication of the report but rowed back only after it was leaked.

Labour is currently conducting an internal investigation into the provenance, leaking and content of the report.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Swastika graffiti was reported on a Jewish home in Stamford Hill over the weekend.

The graffiti, on Springfield, left the family and small children traumatised about being targeted and fearing for what may happen next.

The incident, which took place on Sunday 26th July, was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD851 26/07/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign has launched today and gone global, with Jewish communities around the world, including in Australia and the United States, joining British Jews in walking out of Twitter and other social media platforms for 48 hours to protest antisemitic hatred on the platforms.

The hashtag #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate has also been trending on Twitter, while numerous politicians from across the political spectrum and celebrities have joined the walkout, which began as the idea of actress Tracy Ann Oberman, with whom we are proud to be closely associated, who was joined by activists including Saul Freeman, Fiona Sharpe and others.

Celebrity backers include the historian Simon Sebag-Montefiore, former Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, actors Jason Isaacs and Eddie Marsan, the broadcaster Ian Dale, the comedy writer Armando Iannucci, musician Billy Bragg, and Sarah Brown, the non-profit executive and wife of a former Prime Minister.

Emma Barnett, the BBC presenter, also gave an impassioned monologue on her radio show about why Wiley’s antisemitism – which was the trigger for the walkout – “burns deep”, while Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis has written to the chief executives of Twitter and Facebook (which owns Instagram) accusing them of complicity for not doing more to stamp out antisemitism on their platforms.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

You can keep up with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s updates during the walkout at antisemitism.org/news or by subscribing to our e-mail updates and switching them from weekly updates to daily updates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism and our allies are walking out from Twitter and Instagram for 48 hours on Monday and Tuesday after the social networks refused to close the social media accounts of the musician known as Wiley over his unhinged incitement against Jews.

A raft of celebrities, ministers and commentators are standing behind the walkout, with #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate now a major trending hashtag on Twitter.

On Friday, Campaign Against Antisemitism called for the prosecution of Wiley, the revocation of his MBE, and the closure of his social media accounts by Twitter and Facebook, which owns Instagram. Wiley has already been dropped by his management.

The Home Secretary, Priti Patel, has joined our call for the social networks to be held accountable as large amounts of antisemitic material remained available despite some being deleted by the networks in what appears to have been a token intervention.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Wiley has been tweeting and instagramming vile antisemitism including calling for Jews to be shot and for ‘black people’ to go to ‘war’ with Jews. He clearly has deeply-held antisemitic beliefs based on unhinged conspiracy theories that in our experience are indicative of long-term exposure to Jew-hatred.

“Instead of acting immediately to close down Wiley’s accounts, Twitter and Facebook have decided to protect this racist, with Twitter deleting only a few token tweets and leaving most of Wiley’s incitement to racial hatred online. They have decided to allow a racist to continue to use their platforms to reach hundreds of thousands of people. That is why we are walking out from these social networks and we are heartened to see so many decent people standing with us in doing the same.”

The walkout began as the idea of actress Tracy Ann Oberman, who we are proud to be closely associated with, who was joined by activists including Saul Freeman, Fiona Sharpe and others.

Those who oppose antisemitic racism are encouraged to join the walkout and to add the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism profile badge in solidarity.

You can keep up with Campaign Against Antisemitism’s updates during the walkout at antisemitism.org/news or by subscribing to our e-mail updates and switching them from weekly updates to daily updates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for the prosecution of the musician known as Wiley over his unhinged incitement against Jews. We have also called for the revocation of his MBE and asked Twitter and Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, to close his social media accounts.

The rapper, whose name is Richard Kylea Cowie but who is known as Wiley, has spent today engaged in an escalating rant which has culminated in calls for Jews to be shot and for black people to go to “war” against them.

After a day spent likening Jews to the Ku Klax Klan and claiming that Jews had cheated him and were “snakes”, Wiley tweeted that Jews should “hold some corn”, which is a slang expression meaning that they should be shot. He added “Jewish community you deserve it”.

He also called on “black people” to go to “war” with Jews.

Wiley repeatedly evoked conspiracy theories that Jews were responsible for the slave trade and that modern-day Jews are in fact imposters who usurped black people — a conspiracy theory that has incited acts of terrorism against Jews, such as a stabbing attack in Monsey in New York in December.

As Wiley spewed his antisemitic venom, Campaign Against Antisemitism responded with the facts, for example that the conspiracy theory that Jews were responsible for the slave trade has been described by the Legacies of British Slave Ownership project at University College, London, as based on “no evidence whatsoever”.

Wiley’s racist ramblings, which he apparently referred to as “Black History Lesson For Today”, come after the musician known as Ice Cube tweeted a picture of an antisemitic mural and several other celebrities have promoted the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan. During his rant, Wiley praised Ice Cube.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Our Crime Unit has reported this matter to the Metropolitan Police Service as we consider that Wiley has committed the offence of incitement to racial hatred, which can carry a substantial prison sentence. We have additionally asked Twitter and Facebook, which owns Instagram, to close down his accounts which have hundreds of thousands of followers, to prevent further outpouring of anti-Jewish venom. Our Regulatory Enforcement Unit is contacting the Honours Forfeiture Committee at the Cabinet Office to ask that Wiley’s MBE be revoked, and we will be looking to ensure that no reputable label or manager works with him again.

“The conspiracy theories evoked by Wiley today claiming that white Jews were responsible for the slave trade usurped the position of black people have caused recent bloodshed, for example the terrorist attack against Jews in Monsey, New York in December.

“Wiley has many hundreds of thousands of followers on social media and we have seen today that a significant number of them truly believe the unhinged hatred that he is spreading. We are treating this as a very serious matter which must be met with the firmest of responses.”

The British rapper Wiley has spent the day delivering an antisemitic rant on Twitter, comparing Jews to the Ku Klux Klan, making comments about Jewish power and control of the “system” and insisting repeatedly that “Israel does not belong to you”.

Among the comments were:

  • “Is it anti semetic [sic] to say Jewish people have power?’
  • “If you work for a company owned by 2 Jewish men and you challenge the Jewish community in anyway of course you will get fired”
  • “My ex manager was South Africa/ Jewish and I promise you he taught me so much about how this all works I was shocked [sic]”
  • “Red Necks Are the KKK and Jewish people are the Law…Work that out [sic]”
  • Listen to me Jewish community Israel is not your country I’m sorry”; Jewish community ya too touchy anyway Israel is not yours hold that”; “Israel does not belong to you”; “I don’t care Cos Israel is ours what about that”; and “Israel is ours who wants to talk about that?”; a sentiment also repeated herehere; and here
  • “Certain people out here actually using hitlers tricks and I don’t like hitler just saying tho [sic]”
  • “In some cases the oppressed become the oppressor [sic]”
  • “The Star of David that’s our ting [sic]”
  • “I’m not anti semetic I am anti slippery people there’s a difference [sic]”

Some other tweets in the rant can be accessed herehereherehereherehereherehere; and here.

Wiley’s repeated claim that “Israel does not belong to you”, accompanied by the assertion that “Israel is ours who wants to talk about that?”, as well as his claim that “The Star of David that’s our ting [sic]”, suggests that he may be espousing views associated with the hateful Black Israelite Hebrews movement, which has been known to harass Jews and has been connected to at least one violent antisemitic shooting in the United States.

Wiley’s racist ramblings, which he apparently referred to as “Black History Lesson For Today”, come after Ice Cube tweeted a picture of an antisemitic mural and several other celebrities have promoted the antisemitic hate preacher Louis Farrakhan.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Likening Jews to the KKK is a hideous antisemitic slur, which Wiley can add to the antisemitic tropes he has tweeted about Jewish power and Jews in business. He joins a number of celebrities who have promoted antisemitic themes or individuals in recent weeks, some of whom have apologised and sought rehabilitation. Wiley must immediately do the same, otherwise no respectable label or manager should work with him ever again.”

John Ware, the maker of the BBC Panorama documentary “Is Labour Antisemitic”, is reportedly suing former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for repeating libels that saw the Party reach a settlement with Mr Ware and the whistleblowers featured in the programme.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Mr Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party.

This week, the Party settled the case, issuing an apology and reportedly paying damages and costs worth hundreds of thousands of pounds.

However, Mr Corbyn described the settlement as “disappointing”, saying that it “risks giving credibility to misleading and inaccurate allegations about action taken to tackle antisemitism in the Labour Party in recent years.”

It is understood that Mr Ware will now sue Mr Corbyn directly.

Mr Ware explained his motivations in an impassioned article.

Meanwhile, a former Labour General-Secretary is suing the Labour Party over the leaked internal report which he claims tried to blame him for the Party’s antisemitism crisis.

Lord McNicol, a moderate who served in the role under Ed Miliband and in the first years of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, will be joining some fifty other individuals named in the report who have brought legal claims against the Party after their names were circulated on social media and far-right websites.

The report, compiled in the last weeks of Mr Corbyn’s leadership, tried to deflect from his and his allies’ failings and cast blame on staff whom it claimed were ideologically motivated to undermine Mr Corbyn. It is widely believed that the compilation and leak of the report were intended to undermine the investigation into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). A full statutory investigation was launched by the EHRC in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Mr Ware’s and Lord McNicol’s case, as well as those of the whistleblowers, have been brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has this week called for Mr Corbyn to be suspended from Labour after his conspiratorial statement about the legal settlement.

The damages and legal costs arising from the multiple cases arising from Labour’s antisemitism crisis could amount to millions of pounds.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for the former director and trustee of Islamic Relief Worldwide to be banned from serving as a charity trustee in future after numerous antisemitic comments that he made on social media were uncovered.

The Times has reported that Heshmat Khalifa, who ran Islamic Relief Worldwide, Britain’s largest Muslim charity that received some £570 million in income over the past five years from the United Nations, the European Commission and British taxpayers, posted derogatory comments about Jews on Facebook.

In more than a dozen posts in 2014 and 2015, Mr Khalifa called Jews “the grandchildren of monkeys and pigs” and threw antisemitic insults against Egypt’s President, calling him a “pimp son of the Jews”, a “Zionist pig”, a “Zionist traitor” and a “Zionist criminal”. President el-Sisi deposed his predecessor, Mohammed Morsi, who was affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood.

Mr Khalifa, who was born and educated in Egypt and became a British citizen in 2005, wrote the comments in Arabic. He also used his page to promote the charity and was friends on the platform with other charity trustees.

Mr Khalifa, who has been with the charity since 1999, resigned after The Times confronted the organisation with his comments.

The charity reportedly said that it “sincerely regrets any offence caused” by the comments, which “contravene the values and principles of Islamic Relief Worldwide”, which is a “purely humanitarian organisation with no political affiliations” and worked to help people “of all faiths and none, without discrimination by race, religion, gender or sexual orientation”.

It continued: “Heshmat Khalifa has resigned from the board of trustees of Islamic Relief Worldwide with immediate effect. He will also play no further part in any other Islamic Relief boards. We reject and condemn terrorism and believe all forms of discrimination – including antisemitism – are unacceptable.”

Mr Khalifa regretted the “language and sentiments expressed”, saying that his comments were “my expressions of frustration with the political regime, rather than beliefs that I hold,” and added: “I did not intend to insult the Jewish community and neither do I hold views which are antisemitic. I have dedicated much of my life’s work to promoting tolerance and freedom of religion and beliefs.”

It is understood that the Charity Commision has opened an investigation.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is appalling that Mr Khalifa was able to lead for so long one of Britain’s largest charities whilst expressing brazenly antisemitic views. Islamic Relief has questions to answer about how this went unnoticed. We hope that the Charity Commission will now act to ban him from acting as a charity trustee ever again.”

A tribunal has backed a university after it dismissed a professor for using “positive stereotypes” about racial groups, including Jews.

Stephen Lamonby, a 73-year-old professor, was dismissed by Solent University for making controversial statements in a private conversation with his course leader, including that “I believe that the Jewish are the cleverest people in the world [sic]. They are much maligned because of it. I asked if you were Jewish because of your ability with maths/physics etc. Which is a speciality of theirs.”

He later explained that “I was excited to think she might be one of them – excited to meet a Jewish physicist, who had been my heroes since boyhood.”

Prof Lamonby had also said that “Germans are good engineers” and made a similar comment about Japanese people and Americans. He further apparently said that he “had a soft spot” for young black men because “many are without fathers” and so “need all the help they can get.”

Prof Lamonby took the University to a tribunal, but the Judge C H O’Rourke said: “For the avoidance of doubt, I find that it is clearly at least potentially racist to group nationalities, races, ethnic or religious groups, by entire categories and to ascribe certain abilities or talents (or the opposite) to them, when, of course, as with any such group, talents or abilities will vary wildly from individual to individual…

“While Mr Lamonby sought to argue that his stereotyping (which it was) was positive, such ‘positivity’ is nonetheless potentially offensive to the recipient. A Jew told they are good at physics – because they are a Jew – may well consider that as demeaning their personal intellectual ability/hard work. Secondly, it could also be simply grossly offensive, as the person may not actually be Jewish, but feel some characteristic is being ascribed to them. Thirdly, even if they are Jewish, they may quite properly consider it none of Mr Lamonby’s business.”

The case has caused some controversy because many of Prof Lamonby’s comments were, in his view, complimentary “positive stereotypes”. However, after the judgment Prof Lamonby complained that “You can’t make any comments [in universities] now because they are totally obsessed with racism and to talk about Jews in the context of racism is crazy because they are not even a race, they are an ethnicity.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for universities to take action against academics who indulge in negative stereotypes and antisemitism. If a professor can be dismissed for promoting positive stereotypes, it stands to reason that those deliberately denigrating Jewish students or intimidating them should face the sack.

If any students are concerned about antisemitism on campus or need assistance, they can call us on 0330 822 0321, or e-mail [email protected]

The Labour Party could be facing a legal bill of over £5 million over claims arising from its scandal of institutional antisemitism, according to the JC.

The settlement reached by the Labour Party yesterday in libel proceedings brought by the maker of the BBC Panorama programme, “Is Labour Antisemitic”, and the whistleblowers it featured, including the legal costs, was reportedly in the region of several hundred thousand pounds.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and programme maker John Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases were brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

However, it is anticipated that costs from claims connected to a leaked internal report by the Labour Party could rise into the millions. It is understood that more than 50 individuals are pursuing claims against the Party after their names were circulated on social media and far-right websites.

In addition, it is possible that the Party may face a fine from the Information Commissioner’s Office in connection with the personal data in the unredacted leaked report, which in some cases led to threats against Jews named in the report.

There is also the possibility that claims may arise following the publication of a report into Labour antisemitism by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), which launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Party in May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Mr Lewis called yesterday’s settlement the “first of many battles” in the effort for legal redress of the victims of Labour antisemitism.

It is understood that Sir Keir Starmer has tasked Lord Falconer, the Shadow Attorney General, to manage the Party’s response to matters arising from antisemitism in the Party.

Yesterday, Campaign Against Antisemitism called for Jeremy Corbyn to be suspended from Labour after his conspiratorial statement about the legal settlement.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

After Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that Twitter was locking accounts featuring Stars of David in their profile pictures, Twitter is reviewing its policy, which it claims was directed at ‘yellow stars’ specifically, which it categorised as “hateful imagery”.

Several Twitter users recently contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism reporting that their accounts had been locked, and Twitter provided the following rationale: “What happened? We have determined that this account violated the Twitter Rules. Specifically for: Violating our rules against posting hateful imagery. You may not use hateful images or symbols in your profile image or profile header. As a result, we have locked your account.”

Twitter appeared to have deemed the Star of David, a symbol of Judaism and Jewish pride, to be “hateful imagery”, and was locking the accounts of users who displayed it.

Now Twitter has claimed that the policy was directed only at ‘yellow stars’. Yet the Stars of David in the profile pictures of locked accounts that we saw also included artistic blue Stars of David and graffitied white Stars of David.

Twitter has claimed in its statement that “While the majority of cases were correctly actioned, some accounts highlighted recently were mistakes and have now been restored.”

We are pleased that Twitter has taken remedial action in this individual cases, however questions remain as to whether this was a genuine policy ineptly administered, or whether Twitter has provided an after-the-fact rationalisation for why the accounts of Jewish users displaying their identities were locked.

In response to Twitter’s statement, Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Only one of the accounts locked featured a yellow star, and it very clearly did so as a means of reclaiming the yellow stars used by the Nazis. This is precisely the kind of inept response to antisemitism that we have come to expect from Twitter, which just last week tried to convince us that the viral antisemitic #JewishPrivilege hashtag was legitimate.

“We would happily help Twitter, but they largely ignore us when we approach them, which we take as a reflection of their inconsistency in addressing this. It seems that Twitter prefers to go after Jewish users who proudly display their identity but not after antisemitic users who unabashedly promote anti-Jewish vitriol.”

Others also observed the locking of accounts with Stars of David in their profile pictures.

Recently, Twitter refused to take action against the viral antisemitic hashtag #JewishPrivilege, and earlier this year the social media giant was forced to apologise for permitting advertisements to be micro-targeted at neo-Nazis and other bigots.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is calling for Jeremy Corbyn to be suspended from the Labour Party after he called the Party’s decision to settle the defamation case brought by the Panorama whistleblowers and the journalist John Ware “a political decision” that was “disappointing”.

Mr Corbyn said that the settlement reached today, which reportedly requires the Labour Party to issue an apology and pay damages and costs worth hundreds of thousands of pounds, “risks giving credibility to misleading and inaccurate allegations about action taken to tackle antisemitism in the Labour Party in recent years.” In other words, Mr Corbyn was sticking to the same line that he and the Party took when he was Leader.

The outrage is exacerbated by the fact that ordinarily the Labour Party and Mr Corbyn might have been expected to stand up for whistleblowing workers who call out abuses by their employers. Indeed Mr Corbyn even tweeted as much in 2017, quoting his Shadow Attorney-General Shami Chakrabarti saying: “Whistleblowers keep us safe. We can’t allow them to be silenced.”

It now appears, however, that Mr Corbyn believes that those whistleblowers who tried to keep Jews safe by revealing how the Labour Party under his leadership failed to address antisemitism should be silenced.

Mr Corbyn has a long history of antisemitism controversies implicating him directly, and over 57,000 people signed our petition denouncing him as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.” Campaign Against Antisemitism submitted three complaints against Mr Corbyn over the years since 2016 and these complaints formed the basis of our referral of the Labour Party to the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).

It is past time for Mr Corbyn to be disciplined and suspended by the Labour Party.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “From the backbenches, Jeremy Corbyn continues to spread conspiracy theories to cover up how the Labour Party became institutionally racist under his leadership. A few weeks ago he gaslit the Jewish community by claiming that the EHRC is ‘part of the government machine’ and now he is gaslighting the whistleblowers he bullied, some almost to the point of suicide. We have been calling for Mr Corbyn to be disciplined since 2016. We are again calling on Sir Keir Starmer to suspend Mr Corbyn now and open a disciplinary investigation.” 

The Panorama programme, titled “Is Labour Antisemitic?”, was televised in July 2019 and showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Labour leader Mr Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases were brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Labour Party has settled a defamation case in the High Court brought by seven whistleblowers who featured in last year’s BBC Panorama’s programme titled “Is Labour Antisemitic?” as well as the journalist behind the programme, John Ware.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and the whistleblowers and Mr Ware commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases were brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Today, the Labour Party settled the case, issuing an apology and reportedly paying damages and costs worth hundreds of thousands of pounds.

Mr Corbyn and his former senior aide Seumas Milne and the Party’s former General Secretary, Jennie Formby, are reportedly uneasy with the Party’s decision to settle the case.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Today’s extraordinary settlement shows that the Labour Party recognises that its attempts to discredit the courageous whistleblowers, as well as one of the nation’s most respected journalists, were indefensible. To see the Labour Party trying to destroy the reputation of its own workers for calling out Jew-hatred, in some cases causing serious mental health conditions, was an ignominious spectacle and demonstrated how, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour was ready to ruthlessly betray its own principles and people in order to cover its institutional racism against Jews. As the complainant in the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s statutory investigation into that same institutional racism, we expect the Party to adopt a similarly apologetic approach when the Commission reports.” 

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is appalled by the slap-on-the-wrist sentence for two teenage brothers convicted for beating a senior rabbi bloody late last year.

The two brothers, who pleaded not guilty, were given a twelve-month Youth Rehabilitation Order and sentenced to an electronically-monitored curfew from 6:00 to 18:00 for just 30 days, as well as a victim surcharge of £21 each. They were also both ordered to attend a ten-day Diversity Awareness Programme.

The brothers  — who are aged fifteen and sixteen and cannot be named for legal reasons — were said to have shouted “f*** Jews” and “dirty Jew” during the attack, which took place at approximately 21:45 on Friday 29th November as the rabbi walked along Amhurst Park in Stamford Hill. The assailants ran off laughing.

The incident took place during the Jewish Sabbath, when Orthodox Jews do not use telephones, but the incident was reported to the police and Stamford Hill Shomrim, a volunteer Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol.

The 54-year-old victim, a senior rabbi, was visiting Stamford Hill from Israel for a wedding and was left shaken after the attack, with an injured back and a bleeding finger. He immediately left the UK.

The suspects were charged in December and convicted last month with racially aggravated common assault at Stratford Magistrates’ Court on 25th June following a two-day hearing. Sentencing took place today at Stratford Youth Court.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) had applied for a longer sentence, as the attack was racially motivated. A spokesperson said at the time of the convictions that “this was an unprovoked and despicable act against a Jewish man who was holidaying in the UK. He was clearly targeted in this hate crime and should not have been subjected to such behaviour in our society,” adding that “I hope these convictions provide the victim with some closure and show just how seriously the CPS takes hate crime, which has a corrosive effect on our society and will be prosecuted robustly.”

Detective Constable Matthew Cooksey of the Metropolitan Police has now said: “Hate crime is not tolerated and we take such offences extremely seriously This incident highlights the efforts we are willing to take to track down suspects. It is upsetting that the boys refused to take responsibility for their crimes by pleading not guilty. I hope the conviction has given some sort of closure to the victim.”

However, it is difficult to square the claim of the police and CPS that antisemitic hate crime is taken seriously with the lenient sentence that the court handed down to the offenders, who did not even admit to the crime.

Stephen Silverman, the Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “This was an appalling violent attack on an innocent scholar visiting London, which left him not only with physical injuries but an impression of the UK that sadly our country is beginning to deserve. This failure of the British justice system shows once again that on the rare occasions when antisemites are prosecuted, they face dismally lenient sentences that would not deter anyone.”

“This pitiful sentence is a scandal and makes a mockery of justice. It is a betrayal of British Jews, sending the message that violent assaults motivated by anti-Jewish hatred are barely punished, and signals to victims of antisemitism that their attackers will not face justice. No wonder only a third of British Jews believe that the courts do enough to protect them, when sentences like this demonstrate that Jews do not receive justice in modern Britain. If the CPS means what it said about taking antisemitic crime seriously, it must go to the Crown Court to seek a tougher sentence.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Labour Group is on the brink of losing control of Brighton and Hove City Council as a second councillor has now quit the Party in an antisemitism controversy.

Yesterday, Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that three Labour councillors were facing allegations of antisemitism and considering their political futures. Cllr Kate Knight had resigned from Labour in the face of an impending investigation, Cllr Anne Pissaridou had been suspended from the Party but continued to sit with the Labour Group, and Cllr Nichole Brennan had faced no sanction from the Party.

Cllr Knight’s resignation meant that Labour was no longer the largest Party on the Council, falling from twenty members to nineteen, which was equal to the Greens who served as the Opposition. Labour consequently offered to share power with the Greens.

But now, Cllr Brennan’s resignation means that the Greens are now the largest Party and must decide whether to accept the power-sharing arrangement, let Labour continue to run the Council or seek to take administration of the Council over themselves.

Brighton and Hove City Council is the second local authority in recent weeks to change control due to antisemitism. Recently, in Crawley a Labour councillor resigned from the Party in order to defend herself against antisemitism accusations, leaving Crawley Borough Council with no overall control.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.Image credit: Brighton and Hove Council

Brighton and Hove Council is in disarray as three Labour councillors are embroiled in antisemitism controversies, with one of the councillors having now quit the Party leaving Labour having to offer to share power with the Greens.

Cllr Kate Knight has resigned from the Labour Party in anticipation of a suspension after a series of allegedly antisemitic Facebook posts were uncovered.

Cllr Knight said: “I abhor antisemitism which, along with all other forms of racism, is a scourge that blights our society and every political party. I am not antisemitic and I regret if anything I posted caused distress, as this was not my intention. I do not want this matter to distract from the vital work that the Council needs to do, as we all continue to come to terms with the effects and future consequences of COVID-19. So, after deep reflection and with much regret, I have resigned my membership of the Labour Party with immediate effect.”

Meanwhile, Cllr Anne Pissaridou was suspended from the Labour Party over allegedly antisemitic Facebook posts that she posted several years ago. She stepped down as chair of the Environment, Transport and Sustainability Committee, however she is inexplicably still a member of the Labour Group on the Council.

Cllr Pissaridou said: “I am deeply sorry for my actions and any distress I have caused to the Jewish community. This happened several years ago, before I was a councillor, and the posts I shared do not reflect my views. I do not seek to excuse my mistake. I deeply regret not properly reading information before sharing such hurtful links. I am aware of the complaint that has been made to the Labour Party and will fully co-operate with any investigation.” 

Previously, Cllr Nichole Brennan apologised and resigned from her role as deputy housing chairwoman and rough sleeping chief pending an investigation after pictures emerged showing her holding a sign calling Israel a “racist, apartheid state”. However, it subsequently transpired that she reacted to the ensuing antisemitism investigation by saying she “will not bow down to white supremacy”.

Cllr Brennan has not been suspended from the Labour Party and she continues to sit with the Labour Group.

This means that, of the three controversial councillors who helped to make up Labour’s twenty-strong Group on the Council, one has resigned from the Party, one has been suspended but is still inexplicably sitting with the Group, and the third has not been suspended or faced sanction. The Labour Group now has nineteen councillors, which is equal to the Greens, the Opposition Party on the Council. Consequently, Labour has now reportedly agreed to share power with the Greens.

Recently, in Crawley a Labour councillor resigned from the Party in order to defend herself against antisemitism accusations, leaving Crawley Borough Council with no overall control.

In a further development, in a statement the Leader of the Labour Group on Brighton and Hove Council noted that “I have agreed with the Labour Group that we will establish a Code of Conduct for all Labour councillors. This will have emphasis on social media and the absolute necessity of ensuring people know that what they are sharing comes from trusted sources of information, and the importance of recognising antisemitic tropes.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the Leader to incorporate into the new code a provision to refer to the International Definition of Antisemitism – which both the Labour Party and Brighton and Hove Council have adopted – in any antisemitism matters.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Image credit: Brighton and Hove Council

The High Court has rejected a challenge to Ofcom’s decision not to sanction the BBC over the Panorama investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party.

The challenge was brought by Justin Schlosberg, a senior lecturer in journalism at Birkbeck University and Jeremy Corbyn enthusiast who is reportedly a member of Jewish Voice for Labour, the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation.

After the BBC rejected complaints against Panorama’s programme titled “Is Labour Antisemitic?”, including by the Labour Party itself, some thirty Labour activists escalated their complaint against Panorama to Ofcom, the broadcaster’s regulator, which declined to sanction the BBC over the programme. (The Labour Party decided not to complain to Ofcom.)

Mr Schlosberg then pressed the High Court for judicial review of Ofcom’s decision, raising £25,000 in a crowdfunding campaign. Mr Schlosberg apparently believed that the programme had not achieved due impartiality, as required by BBC regulations, and that the show misled viewers.

However, the High Court has now ruled not only that Mr Schlosberg filed his application for judicial review too late, but that his case was “nowhere near” the evidential threshold required for his challenge to succeed.

Mr Schlosberg has apparently been ordered to pay £4,812 to Ofcom and £4,000 to the BBC to cover their respective legal costs in respect of their preparation of Acknowledgements of Service.

The programme, which was televised in July 2019, showed former Labour Party employees speaking out publicly to reveal Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and it is understood that they and John Ware, the maker of the programme, commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases are being brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

A local councillor in Worcester has recounted how her mezuzah was ripped from her front door and posted through her letterbox with a swastika drawn onto it.

A mezuzah is a decorative case containing a Jewish prayer which is traditionally fixed to the doorpost of a Jewish home.

Cllr Louise Griffiths, a Conservative, then tabled a motion at Worcester Council to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism, which the Council unanimously agreed to do.

Cllr Griffiths said: “Antisemitism was not something I experienced on a regular basis, but it has seemingly become part of my daily life in recent years. For me, having the council sign up to this definition of antisemitism is a no-brainer.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long urged widespread adoption of the Definition. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

Greater Manchester Police (GMP) is reportedly investigating one of its own officers after a swastika was etched onto a colleague’s belongings.

An officer arrived for his or her shift on Sunday only to find a swastika emblazoned on their items in an act the force described as “disgraceful and disgusting”.

Assistant Chief Constable Mabs Hussain said: “I can wholeheartedly say that we are appalled that one of our employees felt that this behaviour was acceptable.

“A colleague has been subjected to a hate crime and there is no place for behaviour like this in GMP or policing nationally, and it’s being treated incredibly seriously.

“It is absolutely unacceptable that an officer has been faced with such an atrocity during their shift and we’re urging any officers or staff with any information to report it.”

The House of Lords has backed plans by the Home Office to proscribe the neo-Nazi group, Feuerkrieg Division.

The group is active in North America and Europe, and the proscription order means that its members could face up to ten years in jail.

Such proscriptions assist in deterring recruitment to neo-Nazi groups and broadcast the Government’s intolerance for far-right activity.

Last month four members of National Action, a proscribed neo-Nazi terrorist group, were sentenced to prison.

Image credit: ADL

Twitter has deemed the Star of David, a symbol of Judaism and Jewish pride, to be “hateful imagery”, and is locking the accounts of users who display it.

Several Twitter users have contacted Campaign Against Antisemitism in recent days reporting that their accounts have been locked, and Twitter has provided the following rationale: “What happened? We have determined that this account violated the Twitter Rules. Specifically for: Violating our rules against posting hateful imagery. You may not use hateful images or symbols in your profile image or profile header. As a result, we have locked your account.”

The social media platform advises users that if they delete the “hateful imagery”, i.e. the Star of David, the account may be unlocked.

The Stars of David in the profile pictures of locked accounts vary from artistic blue Stars of David and graffitied white Stars of David to, most ironically, a portfolio of yellow Stars of David.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It is deplorable enough that Twitter consistently fails to act against antisemitism on its platform, but now it is taking action against Jews for the simple crime of showing pride in their identity by displaying a Star of David. It never fails to astound just how low Twitter is prepared to go.

“So often social media companies claim that they lack the resources to tackle hate on their platforms, but Twitter has put the lie to that claim by demonstrating that it does have the resources, but chooses to target the benign symbol of a victimised minority instead of the countless racists who use its platform with impunity.

“Twitter must immediately restore these accounts, apologise to the owners, and pledge finally to take robust action against the antisemites whom it has enabled for so long.”

Others also observed the locking of accounts with Stars of David in their profile pictures.

Recently, Twitter refused to take action against the viral antisemitic hashtag #JewishPrivilege, and earlier this year the social media giant was forced to apologise for permitting advertisements to be micro-targeted at neo-Nazis and other bigots.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

Lloyd Russell-Moyle, the Shadow Minister for Natural Environment and Air Quality, has resigned from the Labour frontbench, citing a “campaign by the right-wing media” and targeted abuse.

It comes days after he was forced to apologise after it was revealed that he had called Zionism, the movement to give Jews the same right to self-determination as all other peoples, “a dangerous nationalist idea”.

Mr Russell-Moyle has a terrible record on antisemitism, having defended Melanie Melvin, who had tweeted that a Syrian gas attack had been “filmed by the BBC at Pinewood on the orders of Mrs May and the Israeli lobby” and Rebecca Massey who had claimed that “Israel has [the] Tory [and] Labour parties under control”, backed Ken Livingstone and declared that the “Israel lobby manufactured the UK Labour Party’s antisemitism crisis”.

He has also shared a leaked dossier designed to blame Labour’s antisemitism crisis on anti-Corbyn factions within the Party. The unredacted version that he and others shared led to details of antisemitism complainants being shared on neo-Nazi and white supremacist websites.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “It was deeply disappointing that Sir Keir Starmer appointed Mr Russell-Moyle to his Shadow Cabinet, given his record. Mr Russell-Moyle should still face disciplinary proceedings over his past conduct.”

On 28th May 2019, the EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism previously published first-of-its-kind research on the records of every frontbench Shadow Cabinet member on antisemitism. Following Kate Green’s promotion to Shadow Education Secretary after the sacking by Sir Keir Starmer of Rebecca Long-Bailey for promoting an article containing an antisemitic trope, we have investigated her record over the past five years.

As we pointed out in our analysis of the records of other Shadow Cabinet members, the deepest stain on the records of each of the new members is their overall inaction during the years of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership despite the Labour Party’s descent into racism. They were bystanders when several Jewish colleagues were hounded out of the Party, and they stood by too when principled colleagues made the difficult decision to leave the Party because they could not countenance campaigning for the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn to become Prime Minister, which all of the new members of the Shadow Cabinet did at the end of last year. Indeed some members of Sir Keir’s Shadow Cabinet served in Mr Corbyn’s. Collectively, they have a mountain to climb in order to reclaim the authority to speak out against antisemitism — or indeed any form of prejudice.

Some of Sir Keir’s Shadow Cabinet members have long records on antisemitism – whether positive, negative or mixed – but it is equally telling when their records are short, as it signifies just how little they did as their once fiercely anti-racist Party became mired in anti-Jewish hatred.

Turning to Ms Green, she served briefly in Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Cabinet as Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities in the first few months of his leadership.

She has been vocal in her disgust at antisemitism in the Labour Party, showing solidarity with then-Labour MP Luciana Berger on multiple occasions, opposing Ken Livingstone’s statements and declaring that she was “sickened” by statements by the disgraced then-Labour MP Chris Williamson.

Ms Green also attended a rally against antisemitism in the Labour Party.

However, Ms Green campaigned for the controversial Labour candidate Lisa Forbes, despite her deeply problematic social media activity. Ms Green later stated: “I know Jewish members are disappointed and angry that I did so, and are concerned that they can no longer trust me to stand up for them. I feel deep regret that my action has lost me trust among Jewish members and friends.  I have been spending time this week speaking to community leaders and parliamentary colleagues about the steps I and the Party must take to rebuild the trust we have lost.”

Ms Green appeared to show confidence in Mr Corbyn’s and Labour’s capacity to address the antisemitism crisis.

She welcomed the investigation of antisemitism in the Labour Party by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), which was launched following a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism. Ms Green wrote that the Party must “take immediate action in response to any actions or rectifications the EHRC recommends”.

During the election campaign, Ms Green expressed her shame that a local voter supporting Mr Corbyn had indulged in antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The far-right group, National Defence League (NDL) has been accused of highjacking a protest in Glasgow at the end of last month.

The NDL, which formed following a split with the Scottish Defence League, disrupted a housing policy demonstration in George Square, leading to the arrest of six individuals.

The group promotes far-right tropes and is reportedly connected to an English neo-Nazi figure.

The NDL is believed to have connections to the ‘Blood & Honour’ far-right coalition, which has been active in the UK since the 1980s.

New research has shown how far-right groups are encouraging followers to “deliberately infect” Jews with COVID-19 and target other minorities.

The Commission for Countering Extremism has said that a variety of groups have been seeking to “breed hate” and promote conspiracy theories, including that the pandemic is part of a Jewish plot.

According to Sara Khan, the lead commissioner, the research shows that there are five primary categories of conspiracy theory targeting Jews, namely that “the virus is fake and part of a Jewish plot to mislead the public, that it’s real and was deliberately created for malevolent purposes, that Jews are the primary spreaders of the virus, that Jewish people are dying in disproportionately higher numbers and posts that incite others to deliberately spread the virus to Jews.”

The research also notes how Islamists are using the pandemic to radicalise followers and promote anti-Western narratives.

Ms Khan has called for action against such conspiracy theories and the groups that promote them.

Various reports, including by Campaign Against Antisemitism, have shown how the far-right and others have exploited the pandemic to target the Jewish community.

The University of York has reportedly adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long urged widespread adoption of the Definition. The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism and Lord Pickles worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street.

In recent months, other universities, including the University of Bristol and University College London also adopted the Definition, while the University of Warwick is mired in controversy for refusing to do so.

The development follows a call on universities to adopt the International Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has reacted to the Labour Party’s disclosure that it has received the draft report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), in which Campaign Against Antisemitism is the sole complainant.

Gideon Falter said: “Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, the Labour Party became institutionally antisemitic and brought almost half of British Jews to consider fleeing the country. The Party must be forever changed after this episode so this can never happen again.

“Those responsible remain in the Party and must be held to account if Sir Keir Starmer is to tear antisemitism ‘out by its roots’, as he has promised. The EHRC’s report is a pivotal moment in this corrective process, which is why we made the original referral to the EHRC and were the sole complainant in its investigation.

“Sir Keir told us to judge him not by his words but by his actions, but today marks the first 100 days of his tenure as leader and he has still failed to set out a timeline for fixing Labour’s broken disciplinary process or, with one exception in relation to Rebecca Long-Bailey, take action over incidents in the Party.

“The EHRC has considered a great deal of evidence from us and we will have more to say when the report is published in due course.”

Labour has 28 days in which to make representations to the EHRC in relation to the draft report.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The outspoken actress Miriam Margolyes has claimed that former Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn was “forced” to resign due to “a conspiracy within the Party motivated from Israel”.

Ms Margolyes made the comments to The Times, adding that Mr Corbyn “was not and never was an antisemite,” apparently despite all the evidence to the contrary.

Over 57,000 people signed our petition denouncing Mr Corbyn as an antisemite and declaring him “unfit to hold any public office.”

The notion that accusations of antisemitism are made by Jews in bad faith or emanate from Israel – supposedly as a means to undermine criticism of the Jewish state – are themselves antisemitic tropes.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is writing to the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) after it refused to act against a newspaper that printed a letter comparing Israel to the Nazis because its outdated Editors’ Code of Practice only covers discrimination against an individual.

The Journal, a local newspaper in North-East England, published a letter in May from an individual named Mem Tahir, who regretted that the Jewish community in the region was unable to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Bergen-Belsen due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but then proceeded to say: “When one looks back at history, and looks at the sects that suffered most in the past, one sees that the sufferers in the past are now repeating the atrocities!” The author then expressly compared the effect of Israeli policy to how “the Jewish population suffered under the Nazi regime.”

The letter was a breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism, under which  “drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

Following an intervention by Campaign Against Antisemitism and CAMERA, the editors published a semi-apology in the latest edition of the newspaper, saying: “In Saturday’s Journal, we carried a letter headlined ‘Ending cycles of suffering’, which referred to Israel’s treatment of Palestinians. The letter did not reflect the views of The Journal and we apologise for any offence caused.”

It has now emerged that the letter also appeared in another newspaper, the Evening Chronicle, leading to complaints to IPSO by the local Jewish community and the Representative Council of North-East Jewry, which made their correspondence with IPSO available to Campaign Against Antisemitism.

IPSO has responded to say that there was no breach of the provisions of the Code with regard to accuracy, as “under the Code, the publications were entitled to publish Mem Tahir’s letter on a highly divisive and complex political issue.”

But IPSO also rejected the complaints in connection with Clause 12 of the Code, dealing with discrimination, because “Clause 12 is designed to protect specific individuals mentioned by the press from discrimination based on their race, colour, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation or any physical or mental illness or disability. It does not apply to groups or categories of people. Your concern did not relate to a specific individual. Because of this, your complaint did not engage the terms of Clause 12.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The notion that only individuals but not groups can be discriminated against on the basis of race is not sustainable. For the Code to provide for instances where a Jew or an individual with another protected characteristic is targeted but not for when Jews as a group are targeted leaves the field wide open for antisemitic material to be disseminated in the print media, just as it was in this case. We shall be writing to IPSO urging it to update its Code in line with 21st-century sensibilities.”

We are grateful to the Representative Council of North-East Jewry for bringing this case to our attention and for our collaboration on this matter.

Twitter has refused to take action as an antisemitic hashtag, #JewishPrivilege, has gone viral over the past 24 hours.

The abusive tweets were remarkable for the range of antisemitic motifs they adopted, as a small sample of examples illustrates.

One user wrote, in a post reminiscent of classical Christian antisemitism and nineteenth-century philosophical antisemitism: “#JewishPrivilege is being born into a world where your ancestors have ‘progressive-ly’ transformed an entire civilisation into a Jewish ‘utopia’ by inverting its formerly Christian values into their exact opposites.”

Another said: “#JewishPrivilege is running the Slave Trade, owning the Slave Ships and owning the Cotton Plantations but constantly blaming Slavery on White people with the very media that you completely control.”

Contrast that post with yet another: “#JewishPrivilege is shaming whites while pretending to be one of us…”.

Radical left-wing antisemitism blames the Jews for being white, while for white supremacist antisemites the Jews are not white enough.

The hashtag was also then co-opted by Jews and allies attacking it.

However, on being challenged to take action against the hashtag, Twitter reportedly refused, saying that it did not breach its terms of service, which evidently permit the platform to be used for the dissemination of racist material.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The idea that Jews are a ‘privileged’ group is a slur designed to deny that antisemitism exists and to imply that Jews are a cause of racism towards other minorities. It is an antisemitic concept targeting a people who have suffered relentless persecution, exile, mass murder and the Holocaust, and it has no place in decent discourse.

“It is horrifying to see that #JewishPrivilege has been one of Twitter’s most popular hashtags of the past 24 hours. That it has gone viral demonstrates how ‘unpriveleged’ Jews in fact are. The accounts spewing this anti-Jewish hatred will still be there tomorrow, retweeted in the thousands as Twitter predictably but disgracefully refuses to take any action, adding yet another entry to the platform’s long record of enabling racism against Jews. Twitter’s refusal to act is not just tone-deaf but brazen. Antisemites are able to use Twitter to reach millions and by failing to act on anti-Jewish incitement Twitter is enabling it. Social networks are allowing racism to run rampant and it is high time they were regulated like all other mass media.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The controversial Labour MP, Lloyd Russell-Moyle, has apologised for calling Zionism “dangerous” after historic social media posts were uncovered.

Mr Russell-Moyle, the Shadow Minister for Natural Environment and Air Quality, wrote in 2009 that Zionism is “a very dangerous nationalist idea”. He also said, in reference to Jewish claims to the Land of Israel, that the “idea of inheriting/claim a land that you may have never visited or seen but have a ‘heritage’ claim for is not progressive in its very nature.”

The comments were made on a Facebook group for Woodcraft Folk, an education organisation in which Mr Russell-Moyle had a role, during which period children apparently as young as nine voted to boycott Israeli goods.

Mr Russell-Moyle has reportedly apologised, saying: “I have now deleted these posts and recognise why they were offensive,” insisting that “I am completely and unreservedly committed to supporting Keir Starmer and Angela Rayner’s pledge to rid the Party of antisemitism.”

It has also been revealed that Mr Russell-Moyle wrote a letter of support for Rebecca Massey when she was suspended from the Party. The former chair of Central Hove, Brunswick and Adelaide CLP was apparently suspended on 18th May and expelled on 2nd June, but although Ms Massey had breached the International Definition of Antisemitism on several occasions, according to Ms Massey her expulsion was because of her support for the disgraced ex-Labour former MP Chris Williamson in his independent bid for Parliament after he was booted from the Labour Party.

According to The Sunday Times, Mr Russell-Moyle’s letter of support for Ms Massey only detailed her past support for the Party.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Kent Police are investigating far-right stickers with phrases such as “Hitler was right”, “they lied about Hitler” and “national socialist now”, just weeks after Campaign Against Antisemitism reported that similar stickers appeared in the area.

The new graffiti was found in Cliftonville and Dane Valley in the first week of July.

The report comes soon after members of the proscribed National Action group were sentenced to prison, having engaged, amongst other activities, in far-right stickering and recruitment campaigns.

At the time, Campaign Against Antisemitism commented that we have monitored and reported on far-right stickering operations, including on university campuses, for a long time, including by the new far-right Hundred Handers group. We continue to call on the authorities to take action against these seemingly low-level incidents, including because they are gateways into more heinous and dangerous activity.

A police spokesperson said: “Kent Police received reports on July 1 and 7 regarding offensive graffiti and other material found on street furniture and buildings in several roads in the Cliftonville and Dane Valley areas. Enquiries into the reports are ongoing as officers work to identify potential CCTV opportunities.” 

If you have any more information, please contact Kent Police on 01843 222289 quoting 46/116043/20.”

A police officer has been charged with being a member of the banned neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action following his arrest in March.

Benjamin Hannam, 21, has been suspended from duty in the Metropolitan Police following an investigation by the Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command.

Mr Hannam will appear at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in August.

It is alleged that he belonged or professed to belong to the proscribed group between December 2016 and January 2018 and that he falsely represented himself in his application to join the Metropolitan Police in this connection.

He is also charged with other, unrelated but serious offences.

Deputy Superintendant Ella Marriott said: “These are extremely serious charges for anyone to face, and I fully understand and appreciate how deeply concerning it might be for the public, and particularly local communities here in north London, that the charges are against a serving police officer.”

Other members of National Action were recently convicted and sentenced to prison for their role in the organisation.

National Action was proscribed as a terrorist organisation in December 2016 following a long campaign by Campaign Against Antisemitism and others. Under section 11 of the Terrorism Act 2000, membership of a proscribed terrorist organisation is a criminal offence.

Audible, the online audio book store, has removed antisemitic books from offer after CAA draws them to attention of advertisers on the website.

Booktrust, the nation’s largest children’s reading charity, was being advertised on the website alongside audio book titles such as “Jewish-Zionist Warmongering”.

After Campaign Against Antisemitism drew Booktrust’s attention to this use of its brand, the titles were removed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has recently used a similar strategy dealing with the controversial Urban Dictionary website as well.

Another Labour councillor on Sandwell Council has been revealed to have a record of problematic remarks.

Although Cllr John Edwards says on his Twitter biography that he is “allergic to bigots”, he has described accusations of antisemitism as “smears”, called criticism of the disgraced then-Labour MP Chris Williamson a “smear campaign”, described the International Definition of Antisemitism as “unfit for purpose”, implied comparisons of Israeli policy to the Nazis in breach of the Definition by saying to then-Prime Minister David Cameron that “when you leave Auschwitz David Cameron go to Gaza”.

Cllr Edwards has been a Labour councillor for forty years.

Earlier this week, the Leader of Sandwell Council resigned from her post and was suspended by the Labour Party pending investigation, after Campaign Against Antisemitism called for decisive action by the local authority and the Party over her social media history.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The fashion brand, SHEIN, has apologised for selling a swastika necklace.

Following criticism from fashion influencer Marissa Casey Grossman and others, the “metal swastika pendant necklace”, retailing at $2.50, was removed from sale.

In a statement, the brand said: “SHEIN was not selling a Nazi swastika pendant, the necklace is a Buddhist swastika which has symbolised spirituality and good fortune for more than a thousand years. The Nazi swastika has a different design, it is pointed clockwise and tilted at an angle. However, because we understand the two symbols can be confused and one is highly offensive, we have removed the product from our site.

 “As a multicultural and global brand, we want to apologise profusely to those who are offended, we are sensitive to these issues and want to be very clear that we in no way support or condone racial, cultural and religious prejudice or hostility.

“We are a global and all-inclusive brand and we are taking extreme measures to ensure that all items are cleared through a rigorous vetting process before we retail them.”

Image credit: Fashionambitionist

An inspiring alliance of Jewish and Muslim women in Birmingham removed antisemitic graffiti found in the city reading “Die Jewish”.

The group, determined to show that its members and their communities were “stronger together”, removed the graffiti found on a brick wall in Billesley, transforming it into a rainbow.

A local resident discovered the spray painted words and contacted other women across the city to replace it with the hopeful message: “Standing Together Against Hate – Jewish and Muslim women together.”

West Midlands Police reportedly praised the group for their initiative.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The silver lining of antisemitic incidents can be the inspiring response of non-Jewish allies who abhor racism against their Jewish neighbours. The graffiti showcases the worst of Britain, but such responses can show our country at its best.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Benita Wishart / IAB

After pressure from Campaign Against Antisemitism, the Leader of Sandwell Council has been suspended by the Labour Party pending an investigation and has resigned from her leadership role.

Cllr Yvonne Davies is being investigated by the Party over tweets she sent in 2018, one of which promoted a petition calling for a parliamentary debate over whether Israel has an “improper influence” over British politics, a notion reminiscent of historically popular claims of excessive Jewish power in national politics. In another tweet, Cllr Davies linked to a story titled “Is Israel’s hand behind the attacks on Jeremy Corbyn?”, alongside which she commented: “This makes interesting reading if anyone is wanting to understand where all this emphasis on Labour and antisematism (sic) comes from…”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

A complaint regarding Cllr Davies submitted to Labour reportedly accused her of “breaching Labour’s social media policy”.

In a cabinet meeting yesterday, Cllr Davies resigned as Leader, having been elected to the post a year ago. In her eighteen-minute resignation statement, she reportedly criticised “the white male old guard” who sought “only to preserve their own power base for its own sake”.

The local authority has seen multiple changes in leadership in recent years and has reportedly been dogged by scandal.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

TikTok, the popular social media video platform, has reportedly removed numerous videos that promoted a sickening antisemitic song, but only after its own algorithm ensured that they were viewed over 6.5 million times.

The song included the words “We’re going on a trip to a place called Auschwitz, it’s shower time” and apparently appeared on the platform on Sunday. One video featuring the song showed a giant robot scorpion with a swastika trapping and gassing people.

That video received more than six million views, a number eerily corresponding to the number of Jewish victims of the Nazis. Other videos using the song to accompany Holocaust-related graphics garnered another half million viewers. In all, nearly 100 TikTok users made use of the song for their videos.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It was incredibly distressing to watch this sickening TikTok video aimed at children showing a swastika-bearing robot grabbing and incinerating Jews as the music poked fun at Jewish men, women and children being killed with poison gas at Auschwitz

“TikTok has a particular obligation to tackle this content fast because it specialises in delivering viral videos to children and young adults when they are most impressionable, and yet our research has shown that TikTok has become one of the fastest vectors for transmission of memes mocking the Holocaust. We cannot overstate how damaging it is for children to be bombarded with this sort of extreme racist content. They are being radicalised and groomed by extremists when they are using their smartphones and tablets without parental supervision. Social networks keep proving that they will not tackle this incitement. They must be forced to by regulation or we will scarcely recognise future generations.”

This is not the first time that videos on TikTok have been used to mock the Holocaust, and the platform has been shown to be infested with far-right antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

A Jewish activist has bravely revealed on Twitter how casual antisemitism persists in some social justice circles.

Adam Ma’anit, a writer, activist and former co-editor of the New Internationalist, has described the casual antisemitism he faced on his first day at a new job, demonstrating that quiet forms of prejudice against Jews persist even when they do not make headlines.

Mr Ma’anit writes:

“On the first day of my new job, I was introduced to a former employee who was held in high regard. Squinting their eyes at me they asked the question most foreigners dread: ‘Where are you from?’ My colleagues just froze in that awkward British embarrassed way but said nothing.

“I tried to deflect. They persisted. ‘No, really, where are you from?’ now edging towards me. I lacked confidence because this was literally my first day on the job. The silence of seven people all staring at me palpable as this interrogation continued unabated.

“‘I’m Israeli,’ I said reluctantly because I knew where this would lead. ‘Aha!’ They exclaimed. Eyes now no longer squinting, head nodding like they had known all along I stood out as not quite belonging. Not one of them. The public interrogation continued, my colleagues mute.

“‘Don’t you want to burn that Israeli passport?’ they said, making a sparking lighter gesture with their hand and a barely contained grin. Now seriously uncomfortable, everyone staring at me, I meekly said that I didn’t and that it was my only passport.

“My visible discomfort (I physically moved behind a desk to put distance between myself and them) must have finally inspired one person to yank themselves out of their own awkwardness and they eventually managed to steer the conversation away.

“I felt humiliated. I made an excuse to go outside to get some air. I cried. I wanted to call my wife to tell her what had just happened. We had just had a baby, moved house, and I needed this job so badly. I didn’t want to complain, because this person was clearly revered.

“They had a rep for being a particularly fearless direct action activist, and in that world that carries with it a lot of currency and cred. I have since never been to an office party because they would be there.

“What astonishes me is that if this was done to a person of any other nationality (we get trainings on this), it would rightly be seen as bigoted othering. This is how ‘Zionists’ get dehumanised in progressive spaces. It’s an acceptable, even encouraged, righteous hatred.

“I’m not interested in apportioning blame to one individual. This problem is fairly endemic in what [the academic] David Hirsh calls ‘the community of the good’. It allows people to dress up discriminatory racist discourse and action against 90+% of Jews within a morally acceptable frame.

“No good comes from dehumanisation. The person who aggressively othered me because of my nationality had no trouble desecrating a memorial, wanting people to take inspiration from a terrorist group that murders children to ‘bump off’ Israeli politicians, or Nazi comparisons.

“I’ve worked in lefty activist circles all my adult life. I’ve had to endure numerous such instances of callous dehumanisation and disregard. Everything from offensive Holocaust comparisons to justification for terrorism ‘Hizballah’s not that bad’, ‘Hamas want peace’ [Hizballah and Hamas are both genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations].

“In one job, a colleague nonchalantly said to me that they ‘would never have imagined a time when they would employ a Jew, let alone an Israeli Jew’. A trade unionist told me that they’ve ‘never met a good Jew before’. A Parliamentary assistant called me a ‘self-hating Jew’.

“A prominent non-Jewish social justice activist confidently opined that ‘Jews sadly haven’t learned the moral lessons of the Holocaust’. An environmental activist spat in my face when they learned I was from Israel and threatened to assault me if they saw me again.

“I’m ashamed to think about how often I just kept quiet about it. Certain circles are extremely hostile to anyone who goes against the grain. If anything is going to change, the left need to start listening to Jews (and I don’t mean the few token Jews they Bat-dial in a pinch).

“After the disaster that was Corbynism, when I see people clinging desperately onto the same tired narratives of ‘smears’, gaslighting Jews, still defending the indefensible, I know that this won’t shift until enough of us stand up to it.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The phrase “F*** Yids” has been found daubed on a telephone box in Stamford Hill.

The antisemitic graffiti was discovered inside the phone booth outside Stamford Hill Library, Portland Ave, London N16 6SB.

The graffiti was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD7279 06/07/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

A Labour councillor has reportedly resigned from the Party in order to defend herself against antisemitism accusations, leaving Crawley Borough Council with no overall control.

Karen Sudan will now sit as an independent on both West Sussex County Council and Crawley Borough Council, leaving Labour and the Conservatives with seventeen councillors each on Crawley Borough Council, such that Labour no longer controls the local authority.

The antisemitism allegations reportedly turn on three tweets that Cllr Sudan posted. In one tweet, from 2017, Cllr Sudan declared that she was opposed to “all kinds of racism” but was blocking a group of Labour antisemitism activists from interacting with her on the social media platform.

A second tweet, from 2018, apparently accused the media of being “too busy making up and/or exaggerating stories about antisemitism in the Labour Party” to worry about other forms of racism. This tweet was sent during the summer of 2018 when Labour was deciding whether to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism and various antisemitism scandals involving Jeremy Corbyn were uncovered.

The third tweet, from earlier this year, shared a link to an article titled ‘Reject the Ten Pledges’, alluding to ten pledges that a Jewish charity was asking Labour leadership candidates to make to demonstrate their commitment to fighting antisemitism in the Party. The article apparently claimed that the notion that Labour had an antisemitism problem had been “widely debunked” and described the ten pledges as “politically motivated weaponisation of antisemitism to attack the Left and the Palestine solidarity movement”.

Cllr Sudan, who has been a member of the Labour Party for 50 years, insisted that she is “not an antisemite”, described the evidence as “pathetic”, and claimed that if she remained a member of the Party, she would “have to keep quiet” about the allegations during an investigation to avoid being suspended, so “the only way I could do that and stop the gossip and the maligning stuff that would be around it was to resign from the Party and put it out there so that people can see how stupid and ridiculous it is.”

In a statement, Peter Lamb, Labour’s leader on the council, denied that the complaint had come from one of Cllr Sudan’s Labour colleagues, saying: “I think she thinks it’s me but I’m not an idiot. If we were going to put in a complaint against someone, we’d wait until the end of the year when you get the chance at the local elections to replace them with someone else.” It is disconcerting that complaints about racism might only be submitted with electoral considerations in mind.

Bizarrely, Mr Lamb reportedly added: “Reading through the text of what was submitted, it looks very professionally written to my mind – which rather removes anyone in the Labour group.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The Conservative backbench MP Chris Green has apologised for retweeting a poem referencing ‘Rothschilds’ and ‘New World Order’.

Mr Green, the MP for Bolton West, earlier retweeted and then deleted a video in which the controversial comedian Chris McGlade reads a poem called “The Right to Hate”. The poem is dedicated to “all those globalists out there” and criticises the “global New World Order”. The poem’s narrator also complains of being called an antisemite but insists that “the Rothschilds are the richest banking family in this world and that’s got nothing to do with them being Jewish and everything to do with them being multi-billionaires who really do influence the dollar, pound and yen.” Mr Green retweeted the poem with the caption “If you love poetry, this is worth a listen.”

In his apology on Twitter, Mr Green said: “Antisemitism comes in many forms, some more obvious than others. I tweeted a section of a poem that in other parts ref “New World Order” & “Rothschilds”. I should have been more careful about what & who I was tweeting. I offer a full & unreserved apology & have deleted the tweet.”

Mr Green also explained to The Manchester Evening News that he deleted the tweet as soon as he realised what the rest of the poem contained. He said: “The key thing is that as soon as you know that you have done something wrong you address it. As soon as I realised I had done something wrong I got rid of it and I felt I also needed to give an explanation and an apology.”

However, he apparently added: “One of the things I’m a little bit concerned about is that I think some people believe that I shared the entirety of this poem but it was only a small clip. I had no idea who this bloke was and I hadn’t seen or heard from him before. It was a clip from the poem. It was a two-minute section of it. I don’t know if someone’s been smart with the editing or something because there was zero reference to the New World Order or the Rothschilds in what I tweeted.”

The Bolton West MP has recently come under fire for his activity on social media.

The poem was also retweeted by the leader of the Social Democratic Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Steve Reed MP has apologised for tweeting that a Jewish millionaire was a “puppet-master” hours after Sir Keir Starmer announced this morning that he would speak to his Shadow Communities Secretary about the matter.

On 4th July, Mr Reed tweeted “Is millionaire former porn-baron Desmond the puppet-master for the entire Tory cabinet? @Robert Jenrick @PritiPatel”.

The tweet was a reference to a planning controversy relating to Richard Desmond, the Jewish businessman, and the Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick. However, the notion of Jews as all-powerful puppet-masters is a classic antisemitic trope, and Mr Reed came under fire and deleted the tweet. The tweet was also retweeted (and also deleted) by another Labour MP, Mike Amesbury.

Now, after Sir Keir Starmer announced that he would review the matter and speak to Mr Reed about the tweet, Mr Reed has tweeted: “I want to apologise unreservedly for the language in the tweet I posted on Saturday. It was inappropriate and as soon as I realised my error I deleted it.”

Previously, Andrew Percy MP, The Conservative co-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Antisemitism, reportedly said: “Alluding to Jews as puppet-masters is an age old antisemitic trope and for a Shadow Cabinet member to use this trope is totally unacceptable. If Keir Starmer was serious about tackling antisemitism he would sack Steve Reed on the spot. Otherwise the British people will rightly conclude the action taken against Rebecca Long-Bailey last week was done out of political convenience rather than principle.”

A source close to Mr Reed had previously said: “Steve did not know Richard Desmond was Jewish. He deleted the tweet and did not mean to cause any offence.”

Ms Long-Bailey was recently dismissed by Sir Keir after sharing an article in The Independent that contained an antisemitic trope.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Waterstones has announced that it will remove from sale all books by the conspiracy theorist and antisemitic hate preacher David Icke.

The bookseller reportedly made the announcement after one of Mr Icke’s books, titled ‘Everything You Wanted to Know But Have Never Been Told’, was found at a branch in Southport in a section marked “alternative histories and conspiracies”.

A spokesperson for Waterstones told the Jewish News newspaper: “Most of the selection is done at a local, shop-floor level. We will look into this immediately to ensure any stock is removed from sale.”

Mr Icke uses social media, his books and his stage performances to incite hatred. His preaching is so absurd that since the 1990s he has been dismissed as a crank, but because he is dismissed, there has been no major opposition to him and he has built up a following of thousands upon thousands of disciples whom he has persuaded to adamantly believe that the world is in the grip of a conspiracy run by the “Rothschild Zionists”. His repertoire includes conspiracy myths and tropes classified as antisemitic according to the International Definition of Antisemitism. Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully persuaded some venues to pull out of hosting his events.

Recently, Ofcom sanctioned the television channel London Live for airing an interview with Mr Icke on COVID-19 and Facebook and YouTube resolved to remove Mr Icke from their platforms, albeit because of his conspiracies regarding the pandemic rather than because he is a Jew-hater.

The antisemite Gilad Atzmon has condemned Google for deleting the Youtube channel of the convicted French antisemite Dieudonné M’bala M’bala.

Mr M’bala M’bala, generally known simply as Dieudonné, is a French comedian and political activist who has been convicted for hate speech and advocating terrorism, among other offences, in France and Belgium.

His Youtube channel was apparently reduced to a black screen reportedly as part of a crackdown on hate speech by Google, which owns Youtube.

Mr Aztmon, linking to the story, wrote: “This morning we learn that Black Voices do not matter at all,,, @MbalaDieudo’s YouTube channel is deleted by Google… We know who is behind it yet, the only question that bothers me is where is #BLM?”

Mr Atzmon is an antisemite who has reportedly blamed the Grenfell Tower tragedy on “Jerusalemites” as well as reportedly telling university students that “the Jews were expelled from Germany for misbehaving.” He is not shy about his antisemitism, telling a Jewish Twitter user in 2014: “I am not a Jew any more. I indeed despise the Jew in me (whatever is left). I absolutely detest the Jew in you.”

At one stage, Mr Atzmon was forced to make a humiliating apology to Campaign Against Antisemitism following defamation proceedings, and Campaign Against Antisemitism has successfully pressured venues not to feature Mr Atzmon due to his record of antisemitism.

Most recently, Mr Atzmon has disgracefully tweeted that “The #Left should decide whether it is ‘pro #Jewish’ or ‘pro #Black’ cos the two contradict each other…” Nevertheless, The Guardian newspaper thought it fitting to wish him a happy birthday.

Nigel Farage has been condemned over his repeated use of conspiratorial language popular in far-right circles.

Mr Farage, the leader of the Brexit Party, has recently made reference to “unelected globalists shaping the public’s lives based on secret recommendations from the big banks” and, commenting on the Black Lives Matter movement, has said that it is funded by “globalists”. Mr Farage has made use of these phrases repeatedly in the past.

He has also made continual reference to the Jewish financier, philanthropist and political activist George Soros, Goldman Sachs and “cultural Marxism”.

While these tropes are not necessarily antisemitic in isolation, Mr Farage’s repeated use of these tropes, which are very popular in far-right circles, has led to wide condemnation.

Mr Farage has previously courted controversy with comments about a “Jewish lobby” in the United States, and participated in a series of interviews on the far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ radio show.

Andrew Percy MP, The Conservative co-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Inquiry into Antisemitism, reportedly said: “These conspiracy theories have real world and dangerous consequences and are without question antisemitic. So now he is being put on notice. Farage needs to cut it out before he causes further harm by providing further fuel to racist antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories.”

Catherine McKinnell, Mr Percy’s Labour co-Chair, said: “Talk of shadow cabals, Soros conspiracies and other nonsense has repeatedly been proven to find its roots in anti-Jewish racism. His choice of language, which echoes some of that circulating amongst the far-right online, is worrying and getting worse.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Steve Reed MP tweeted a reference to a Jewish billionaire as a “puppet-master” before deleting the tweet, and now all eyes are on Sir Keir Starmer in anticipation of his response.

Mr Reed, the Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, tweeted on 4th July: “Is millionaire former porn-baron Desmond the puppet-master for the entire Tory cabinet? @Robert Jenrick @PritiPatel”.

The tweet was a reference to a planning controversy relating to Richard Desmond, the Jewish businessman, and the Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick.

Andrew Percy MP, The Conservative co-Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Antisemitism, reportedly said: “Alluding to Jews as puppet-masters is an age old antisemitic trope and for a Shadow Cabinet member to use this trope is totally unacceptable. If Keir Starmer was serious about tackling antisemitism he would sack Steve Reed on the spot. Otherwise the British people will rightly conclude the action taken against Rebecca Long-Bailey last week was done out of political convenience rather than principle.”

Ms Long-Bailey was recently dismissed by Sir Keir after sharing an article in The Independent that contained an antisemitic trope.

It is understood that a source close to Mr Reed said: “Steve did not know Richard Desmond was Jewish. He deleted the tweet and did not mean to cause any offence.”

However, the tweet was retweeted (and also deleted) by another Labour MP, Mike Amesbury.

Sir Keir, appearing on LBC this morning, said that he “hasn’t seen” the tweet “but will take a look at it”. All eyes will be on Sir Keir to see what action, if any, he chooses to take.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has produced a video showing how antisemitism in the Black Lives Matter movement is a betrayal of the legacy of real Civil Rights heroes.

The short video can be watched below. Please share it widely.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called for “strong and decisive action” against the Leader of Sandwell Council and the former leader of Dudley Council after it emerged that the Labour Party is investigating them over antisemitism.

Cllr Yvonne Davies, the current Council leader at Sandwell, is being investigated over tweets she sent in 2018, one of which promoted a petition calling for a parliamentary debate over whether Israel has an “improper influence” over British politics, a notion reminiscent of historically popular claims of excessive Jewish power in national politics. In another tweet, Cllr Davies linked to a story titled “Is Israel’s hand behind the attacks on Jeremy Corbyn?”, alongside which she commented: “This makes interesting reading if anyone is wanting to understand where all this emphasis on Labour and antisematism (sic) comes from…”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, “Using the symbols and images associated with classic antisemitism (e.g. claims of Jews killing Jesus or blood libel) to characterise Israel or Israelis” is an example of antisemitism.

A complaint regarding Cllr Davies submitted to Labour reportedly accuses her of “breaching Labour’s social media policy”.

Cllr Davies reportedly commented: “I do retweet stuff that I probably shouldn’t, but I do not have an antisemitic bone in my body. I have a career of tackling discrimination and unfairness and I would certainly not consider that people who are Jewish have any influence at all over matters that we deal with in society. Whether countries do, and clearly Russia, China, Israel…a lot of countries get involved in stuff for political purposes…but I don’t relate that to anybody’s religion and I think anybody that does is making a big mistake. This is about politics, it’s not about religion at all. Certainly I will be careful in future about what I retweet, because clearly I’m aware that there is a lot of sensitivity around this issue and that things can be taken out of context.”

In Dudley, Cllr Pete Lowe, a former leader of the council, former parliamentary candidate and former Labour candidate for West Midlands Metro Mayor, posted a tweet purporting to shop historical maps of Israel, which he shared in order to criticise the dismissal of Rebecca Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet for sharing an article that contained the antisemitic conspiracy theory. The picture was accompanied in the tweet by a caption from Cllr Lowe reading: “No words of explanation….just in case! #RebeccaLongBailey #LabourParty”. The tweet was subsequently deleted.

Ian Austin, the former Labour MP for Dudley North who quit over antisemitism in the Party, described the tweets as “completely unacceptable”. Mr Austin is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The suggestion that Israel has an ‘improper influence’ in British politics and is ‘behind attacks’ on Jeremy Corbyn is totally unacceptable. The idea that the Jews – or the Jewish state – have outsized influence in national affairs is an infamous antisemitic trope that has no place in political parties or on a local council, let alone coming from the Leader of the council. Both the Labour Party and the council must take strong and decisive action. Those defending Rebecca Long-Bailey’s promotion of an antisemitic conspiracy theory, be they MPs or local councillors, must also be brought to book. At a time when so many are showing solidarity against racism, it is appalling that some individuals in Labour continue to defend or indulge in antisemitism.”

Meanwhile, in Greenwich in London, the Leader of the Council has reportedly referred a fellow Labour councillor to the Party over a series of tweets promoting the controversial group Labour Against Witchhunt” and defending Ms Long-Bailey. Cllr David Stanley reportedly promoted a petition in the form of an open letter to Mr Corbyn, who was then Leader of the Labour Party, worrying that “any criticism of the actions of the state of Israel is now immediately conflated with antisemitism” and “a cynical alliance between those who wish to deflect criticism of Israel and Zionism, and the right-wing in the Labour Party and the news media, who oppose your wider politics.” Cllr Stanley also apparently retweeted posts with the hashtag #IStandWithChrisWilliamson, in reference to the disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson.

Cllr Stanley said: “I have always condemned antisemitism in the strongest possible terms, and fully supported Greenwich council signing up to the full [International Definition of Antisemitism]. I have no time for antisemitic conspiracy theories, but recognise that criticism of the state of Israel can sometimes be wrongly conflated with antisemitism. I support a fair and rigorous procedure for those Labour members who are subject to disciplinary measures due to alleged antisemitic comments.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls for action against these three councillors both by the Labour Party and by their own local authorities.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Roger Waters, a former musician with a long record of baiting Jews, has apologised for saying that American leaders are puppets of a Jewish billionaire and that Israel teaches America how to “murder the blacks”.

Mr Waters made the outrageous remarks in a friendly interview with an Arab channel, but has now apologised for the antisemitic outburst.

The former Pink Floyd star said of the “puppet” remark that “I had no idea that I was evoking an antisemitic trope. I regret any harm or hurt my use of words caused Jewish people, and also any ways it may have reinforced damaging lies about Jews. Nothing could have been further from my intentions.”

Regarding the antisemitic conspiracy theory that Israel was to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, Mr Waters said: “A friend I called for guidance on this… told me that Israel does not train US police in tactics like those used to kill George Floyd. They don’t have to.”

Mr Waters has apparently not offered any apology for saying that Zionism needs to be “removed” or his similar past calls for Israel’s destruction.

In a past concert, Mr Waters unveiled a balloon pig with a Star of David emblazoned on its side.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The fact that Mr Waters did not realise that saying that rich Jews control countries was an antisemitic trope speaks to the breathtaking ignorance of a man who holds very certain opinions on the Jews and other controversial topics. Perhaps Mr Waters will humbly reflect on his record and become less outspoken in future.”

Image credit: MEMRI

The Forward Momentum faction has prevailed in internal elections in the pro-Corbyn pressure group.

Forward Momentum was backed by John McDonnell, the former Shadow Chancellor and senior ally of former Leader Jeremy Corbyn, and won on a platform of critical engagement with the new Labour Leader, Sir Keir Starmer.

The Momentum Renewal slate, which was backed by former Shadow Justice Secretary Richard Burgon and called for an uncompromising opposition to Sir Keir’s leadership, was defeated.

It is understood that Forward Momentum is also critical of what it perceived as the autocratic leadership style of former leader Jon Lansman, who was among Mr Corbyn’s most vocal Jewish supporters.

Momentum played a leading role in whitewashing the Labour Party’s antisemitism scandal during the period of Mr Corbyn’s leadership.

Mr McDonnell too has a long record of defending Labour’s abominable record on antisemitism. Recently, he retweeted a Twitter user with a history of extreme views and questioning the Holocaust. When this was brought to Mr McDonnell’s attention he deleted the retweet and unfollowed the user.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

 

The BBC has reportedly ordered its television presenters not to wear Black Lives Matter (BLM) badges on air after Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed worrying antisemitism in the movement and its other extreme views emerged.

Executives at the public broadcaster declared that “visual symbols of support” for BLM should not be worn on screen after leaders within BLM hijacked the killing of George Floyd to spread antisemitism and to promote an extreme agenda. “The BBC cannot be seen to support any kind of cause over another, and Black Lives Matter is certainly a campaign,” the BBC ruled.

The decision was part of a wider backlash against the BLM movement after Campaign Against Antisemitism called out antisemitic tweets over the weekend. Police forces and several celebrities have distanced themselves from the movement, as has the Premier League.

Among the first football clubs to break with BLM were Tottenham Hotspur, which said that “it is unacceptable that a value-based action is being hijacked by those with their own political agenda,” and Crystal Palace, which announced: “We would like to make clear that we do not endorse any pressure group or body that carries the same term in its name, and we strongly believe that organisations should not use this important force for change and positivity to push their own political agendas. We want to be part of a world that is fair, inclusive and open to all.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are not surprised that the antisemitic outbursts and revelations of other extremist views from within the BLM movement are causing those who had lent their support to distance themselves. All decent people oppose racism, which is why seeing anti-Jewish racism emerging from within the movement against anti-black racism has been an ugly sight. Prejudice cannot be beaten with more prejudice.”

The Conservative MP Chris Green retweeted and then deleted a video in which the controversial comedian Chris McGlade reads a poem called “The Right to Hate”.

The poem is dedicated to “all those globalists out there” and criticises the “global New World Order”. The poem’s narrator also complains of being called an antisemite but insists that “the Rothschilds are the richest banking family in this world and that’s got nothing to do with them being Jewish and everything to do with them being multi-billionaires who really do influence the dollar, pound and yen.”

Mr Green retweeted the poem with the caption “If you love poetry, this is worth a listen.” The Bolton West MP has recently come under fire for his activity on social media.

The poem was also retweeted by the leader of the Social Democratic Party.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Swastikas have appeared by the River Lea in the North London neighbourhood of Stamford Hill.

The graffiti was observed this morning by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol. If you have any more information, please contact the Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123.

Meanwhile, in Barnet, a man has been charged with 18 counts of racially or religiously aggravated criminal damage in connection with multiple incidents of antisemitic graffiti on bus stops in the borough between February and July 2019.

Nicholas Lalchan, 47, is due to appear at Willesden Magistrates’ Court on 21st July.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Premier League and various footballers and commentators have begun withdrawing support from Black Lives Matter (BLM) after Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed antisemitism within the movement.

The Premier League reportedly said in a statement it was “aware of the risk posed by groups that seek to hijack popular causes to promote their own political views” and that “these actions are entirely unwelcome and are rejected,” it added. The statement came after the ‘official’ Black Lives Matter movement Twitter account published an antisemitic tweet accusing Zionism of having “gagged” Britain, among other extreme views espoused by organs of the movement.

On Sky Sports, pundits and commentators Patrice Evra, Jamie Redknapp, Gary Neville and Kelly Cates all opted to stop wearing BLM badges in coverage this week. Matt Le Tissier had already revealed that he had worn the badge because studio executives had required him to do so and that he is reviewing the matter.

The developments came after Gary Lineker distanced himself from the Black Lives Matter movement. The footballer-turned-celebrity was asked by actor Laurence Fox on Twitter as to his views on the Black Lives Matter movement following the controversy this weekend, and he responded: “Why do you ask? I didn’t retweet it and wouldn’t dream of doing so, therefore I can’t really understand what your issue is.”

Other sportsmen are also understood to be reconsidering their support for the movement following numerous controversies, distinguishing between their strongly-felt opposition to racism against the black community and their disenchantment with the Black Lives Matter movement itself.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “We are not surprised that the antisemitic outbursts and revelations of other extremist views from within the BLM movement are causing those who had lent their support to distance themselves. All decent people oppose racism, which is why seeing anti-Jewish racism emerging from within the movement against anti-black racism has been an ugly sight. Prejudice cannot be beaten with more prejudice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism called out the verified ‘@UKBLM’ Twitter account for its antisemitic tweets over the weekend.

A man driving past a prominent synagogue in a Jewish area was heard shouting “Hitler” at the Jews gathered outside.

The incident took place on 29th June outside Hagers synagogue just off Golders Green Road in North London, and was reported by Shomrim North West London, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Witnesses should contact Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Image credit: Google

The Black Lives Matter Movement has condemned “antisemitism slurs” directed at BLM UK, a separate entity which claimed that Zionism “gagged” Britain.

Campaign Against Antisemitism criticised BLM UK, an entity of unknown provenance that exists only on Twitter and GoFundMe, after it claimed that “British politics is gagged of the right to critique Zionism” following the dismissal of Rebecca Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet for sharing an article that contained the antisemitic trope that Israel is somehow to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd.

Now the Black Lives Matter Movement, which describes itself as having been “formed in London in 2016 and is not affiliated to BLMUK,” published an article on its website titled “BLMUK, Palestine and media antisemitism slurs”, which insisted that the Black Lives Matter Movement “support[s] the struggle against racism in all its forms” including antisemitism, called for action against racism against black women MPs in the Labour Party (with reference to a controversial internal leaked report), and called the criticism of BLM UK a “witch hunt” which “weakens the fight against all forms of racism” and that this is “the aim of much of the media and the right in this country”.

It was not clear why standing up to antisemitism by BLM UK could “weaken the fight against all forms of racism”.

Following the exposure of antisemitism in the Black Lives Matter movement by Campaign Against Antisemitism, there has been a considerable withdrawal of support from the movement by mainstream society and celebrities who nonetheless rightly maintain an abhorrence of racism toward the black community.

Seumas Milne, Jeremy Corbyn’s divisive senior aide, and Thomas Gardiner, Labour’s Director of Governance and Legal Affairs, have both quit their employment with the Party.

Mr Milne, who has a record of espousing extreme political views, served as Executive Director of Strategy and Communications under Jeremy Corbyn. As a political appointee, his departure following the election of Sir Keir Starmer as Leader of the Party was widely considered inevitable.

Thomas Gardiner’s role in Labour Headquarters involved overseeing the catastrophic complaints process, and became known for his decision that a meme showing an alien crustacean with a Star of David emblazoned on its back sucking the life out of the Statue of Liberty was somehow not antisemitic.

Mr Gardiner’s departure represents the next stage of the clearout of controversial Labour staff by the new General-Secretary, David Evans, who replaced Corbyn ally Jennie Formby.

Mr Gardiner is being replaced by Alex Barros-Curtis, an aide of Sir Keir, on a temporary basis.

While the removal of tainted staff is a welcome development, the promised independent disciplinary process has yet to materialise.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The television personality and journalist Piers Morgan has not responded to comment regarding a historic photograph of him wearing a Nazi uniform at a costume party.

The photograph has been made exclusively available to Campaign Against Antisemitism by Guido Fawkes.

We have been told that the photograph was taken at a costume party about 30 years ago, at which Mr Morgan was heard saying “Heil Hitler!” and seen goose-stepping.

We wrote to Mr Morgan to advise that, while we do not imagine that he is an admirer of the Nazis and we recognise that he was very young at the time, nevertheless it did not appear to be an appropriate way to behave.

However, Mr Morgan has not responded. He has in the past demanded explanations and apologies from celebrities and politicians for their past conduct, however he seems not to apply the same rules to himself.

Image credit: Guido Fawkes

Just days after Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed a journalist’s record of inflammatory social media posts, he is no longer featured as a writer at the online magazine for teenagers.

Toby Maxtone-Smith, who worked at The Day, responded to a report about antisemitic Chelsea fans performing Nazi salutes, singing about ‘Yids’ and imitating a gas chamber by complaining on Twitter about “snide journos [journalists] desperate to make a quick buck ruining someone’s life for behaving like a d***head while pissed”.

He also made jokes about foreskins and claimed that the reason the Labour Party’s antisemitism scandal was covered by the media supposedly to an extent greater than Jeremy Corbyn’s vote against the Falklands War was because “Jews are over-represented among the kind of people journalists know. The media is very bad at checking its own biases.”

Mr Maxtone-Smith has made further worrying comments on a different Twitter account, and he has also made derogatory comments about Chinese people and Roma, as well as women.

After Campaign Against Antisemitism exposed his record, he no longer features on the masthead of the online magazine.

Gary Lineker has distanced himself from the Black Lives Matter movement after it published an antisemitic tweet accusing Zionism of having “gagged” Britain.

The footballer-turned-celebrity was asked by actor Laurence Fox on Twitter as to his views on the Black Lives Matter movement following the controversy this weekend, and he responded: “Why do you ask? I didn’t retweet it and wouldn’t dream of doing so, therefore I can’t really understand what your issue is.”

Meanwhile on Sky Sports, pundit Matt Le Tissier revealed that studio executives had required him to wear a badge supporting the Black Lives Matter movement and that he is reviewing doing so, while other sportsmen are also reconsidering their support for the movement following numerous controversies, distinguishing between their strongly-felt opposition to racism against the black community and their disenchantment with the Black Lives Matter movement itself.

Campaign Against Antisemitism called out the verified ‘@UKBLM’ Twitter account for its antisemitic tweets over the weekend.

Facebook is under pressure from advertisers to act against hate speech on its platform, as part of a “Stop Hate for Profit” campaign.

Major brands are suspending their advertisements on Facebook in an effort to force the tech behemoth to address proliferating hate speech.

Among the brands who have joined the campaign are Coca Cola, Unilever, Verizon and Honda US.

However, concerns have been raised as to double standards regarding which hate speech is rightly banned from social media platforms and which hate speech, wrongly, is not banned. For example, the broadcaster Maajid Nawaz has observed that antisemitism – particularly when it emanates from the far-left, Islamist terrorist groups and minority users like Louis Farrakhan – is given a free ride.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Withdrawing advertising revenue from online platforms works. It forces them to stop finding excuses and change their behaviour — we have been doing this for years; for example we just forced Urban Dictionary to remove an abhorrent antisemitic term of abuse. Tech platforms already successfully prevent the posting of certain types of content such as copyright works and child pornography. The failure to address the proliferating antisemitic and racist content on Facebook is therefore a failure of willpower. Vile antisemitic content on these platforms is not hard to find and it is a reason that the far-left, Islamist groups and the far-right, are so able not only to intimidate Jewish users but also incite the kind of violence that has left a trail of bodies in the real world, from Pittsburgh to Poway.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism continues its robust engagement with social media companies over the content that they enable to be published, and we continue to make representations to the Government in this connection.

The Oxford branch of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement has apologised for using the antisemitic ‘Freedom of Humanity’ mural as a cover photo for a Facebook event.

The mural originally appeared in East London in October 2012 after an outcry. In 2018 then-Leader of the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, was discovered to have defended the mural, which featured apparently-Jewish bankers beneath a pyramid often used by conspiracy theorists playing Monopoly on a board carried by straining, oppressed workers, several of whom had dark or black skin.

After a local councillor criticised the advertisement, Oxford BLM issued an apology, saying that the matter was “deeply concerning and the person who used the image is deeply sorry. We absolutely do not condone the image used and have since removed it. We will use this time to learn from their mistakes and ensure every person who attends our events feels safe. We stand resolutely against antisemitism, and see our struggles for liberation as interconnected.”

The mural has recently been promoted without apology by the American rapper Ice Cube, also in connection with the Black Lives Matter movement. It is inexcusable to sully the noble cause of fighting anti-black racism by using expressions of anti-Jewish racism. Racism cannot be combated by recourse to other forms of racism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The use of a blatantly antisemitic mural – which has even been in the news in recent years due to Jeremy Corbyn’s defence of it – to promote an event is unacceptable, and we are pleased that the Oxford chapter of the BLM movement removed it within a few hours and issued an apology promising to learn from the mistake. It is regrettable that the national BLM movement did not show similar contrition when it tweeted that Zionism ‘gagged’ Britain yesterday. BLM should aspire to be a movement against racism that unifies people and achieves lasting change, not a movement that spreads hatred and achieves lasting division. You cannot fight prejudice with prejudice.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called on the BBC to ban Maxine Peake for appearances on its television and radio platforms until she makes amends for promoting an antisemitic conspiracy theory.

Ms Peake is reported in The Independent to have said: “The tactics used by the police in America, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck, that was learnt from seminars with Israeli secret services.” Rebecca Long-Bailey MP subsequently shared the article and was consequently sacked from the Shadow Cabinet.

Ms Peake subsequently said for promoting the notion that Israel is to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, saying: “I feel it’s important for me to clarify that, when talking to The Independent, I was inaccurate in my assumption of American Police training & its sources. I find racism & antisemitism abhorrent & I in no way wished, nor intended, to add fodder to any views of the contrary.”

However, Ms Peake did not apologise.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Sir Keir Starmer has shown leadership by sacking a senior frontbencher for sharing Maxine Peake’s antisemitic conspiracy theory. The BBC should follow suit and end its work with Maxine Peake until she formally apologises for promoting an antisemitic trope and agrees to undertake antisemitism training. Her mealy-mouthed ‘clarification’ is not enough. If the BBC fails to act after having taken strong action against some of its own presenters for racial comments against other minorities, the public will rightly conclude that it has a double standard when it comes to antisemitism.”

Labour’s Nia Griffith has said that defenders of Rebecca Long-Bailey are guilty of antisemitism while her colleague, Claudia Webbe, has refused to say whether she believes that the conspiracy theory publicised by Ms Long-Bailey was antisemitic or not.

Ms Long-Bailey was sacked from the Shadow Cabinet last week for sharing an article in The Independent in which the actress Maxine Peake promoted an antisemitic conspiracy theory that Israel was somehow to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd. Far-left factions of the Labour Party, including MPs have rallied to Ms Long-Bailey’s defence.

Ms Griffith, the Shadow Welsh Secretary, when asked whether MPs who supported Ms Long-Bailey were themselves guilty of antisemitism, replied: “Well I think they are and I think they’re also in danger of going backwards and going back over old arguments and old mistakes because what we need now is clear, decisive action to make sure that we root out antisemitism in the party.”

Among those defending Ms Long-Bailey are John McDonnell, the former Shadow Chancellor who launched a petition calling for Ms Long-Bailey’s reinstatement, and other MPs such as Claudia Webbe.

Ms Webbe appeared on BBC radio and was asked whether she believed that the conspiracy theory that appeared in the article shared by Ms Long-Bailey was antisemitic but refused to answer. “Was it antisemitic or not?” the host, Emma Barnett, asked at least four times, and Ms Webbe responded that “the leader himself has said that he didn’t fire Rebecca because she did something antisemitic,” an erroneous assertion that was quickly corrected by Ms Barnett. Ms Webbe refused to be drawn on whether the conspiracy theory was antisemitic, saying only “I’ve given you my answer,” “you’re not actually going to get any further from me” and “the conspiracy theory is wrong. Of course it’s wrong…I do know that it is a conspiracy theory absolutely.”

Ken Livingstone, who was suspended from Labour for comments about Hitler and Zionism, has also maintained, even following Ms Long-Bailey’s dismissal, that there is no antisemitism problem in the Party. Ms Webbe used to serve as a full-time advisor to Mr Livingstone.

The Socialist Campaign Group of councillors has also published a statement in support of Ms Long-Bailey, declaring: “It is not racist to criticise the repressive actions of states nor to point out the links between repressive authorities.” Incredibly the signatories have still not grasped why the conspiracy theory is antisemitic, but perhaps that is not surprising given one of their number – Cllr Jo Bird – has joked in the past about “Jew process” and has twice been suspended from the Labour Party. It is understood that senior trade unionists have also expressed support for Ms Long-Bailey.

Former leader and current Shadow Minister Ed Miliband insisted that those defending Ms Long-Bailey would not face disciplinary action.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has called out the UK chapter of Black Lives Matter (BLM) today after it claimed that “Zionism” has “gagged” Britain.

BLM’s official UK account tweeted this morning: “As Israel moves forward with the annexation of the West Bank, and mainstream British politics is gagged of the right to critique Zionism, and Israel’s settler colonial pursuits, we loudly and clearly stand beside our Palestinian comrades. Free Palestine.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism responded: “The Black Lives Matter movement should embrace solidarity from Jews. There have been calls for violence against us from prominent BLM supporters with no official condemnation. Now from the official UK BLM account, we hear the lie that fighting antisemitism has ‘gagged’ legitimate debate.

“Zionism is the movement for the self-determination of Jews. The right to the ‘self-determination of peoples’ is universal and enshrined in Article 1 of the UN charter. So-called ‘anti-Zionism’ exclusively denies Jews that universal right and is therefore antisemitic.

“BLM should aspire to be a movement against racism that unifies people and achieves lasting change, not a movement that spreads hatred and achieves lasting division.

“Educate yourselves. You cannot fight prejudice with prejudice.”

As social media swiftly divided amongst those who firmly backed BLM and those who were appalled by their bigotry, BLM chose to entrench its position, issuing further tweets that ‘gaslight’ Jews and seek to redefine what antisemitism is.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has continued throughout the day to expose and explain their bigotry.

The far-right attacks the Jews for not being white enough and the far-left attacks the Jews for being too white.

BLM is treading a well-worn path walked by many extremists and abhorred by real civil rights leaders like Dr Martin Luther King Jr, who once told a student in Boston who had made a comment attacking ‘Zionists’: “When people criticise ‘Zionists’, they mean ‘Jews’. You’re talking antisemitism!”

This is not the first time that Campaign Against Antisemitism has had to contend with prejudice from supposed anti-racists, and no matter where the hatred comes from, we will always do whatever it takes to defend British Jews. It is why we are here.

Labour’s far-left Socialist Campaign Group of MPs met with Sir Keir Starmer today to express their opposition to the sacking of Rebecca Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet after she shared an article containing an antisemitic trope baselessly linking Israel to the killing of George Floyd. Not only did they call for Ms Long-Bailey’s punishment to be reversed, showing that they have learned nothing from this scandal, but they also revealed the extent of their obsession by then managing to spend the rest of the meeting discussing Israel.

Ms Long-Bailey was sacked for sharing an article in which the actress Maxine Peake claimed that Israel was to blame for the killing of Mr Floyd. Ms Peake is reported in The Independent to have said: “The tactics used by the police in America, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck, that was learnt from seminars with Israeli secret services.” This is an antisemitic conspiracy theory, as it needlessly and baselessly injects the Jewish state into a matter that has nothing to do with it. Even Ms Peake was forced to admit it was untrue.

Numerous far-left outriders and MPs have tried to claim that casting the trope as antisemitic is to silence criticism of Israeli policy, despite there being no grounds at all for the conspiracy theory that kneeling on people’s necks is an innovation of the Jewish state.

Jeremy Corbyn, the former Leader of the Labour Party, apparently urged Sir Keir in the meeting to take a tough line on Israeli policy and to meet the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, presumably in the hope that the group might persuade Sir Keir, contrary to the view of the mainstream Jewish community and elementary logic, that the conspiracy theory is not antisemitic.

It is extraordinary – but wholly unsurprising – that a meeting precipitated by the offensive injection of Israel into an unrelated matter is devoted to discussion of Israel.

Other far-left MPs have also weighed in on Ms Long-Bailey’s behalf in the last two days.

John McDonnell, the former Shadow Chancellor, launched a petition to reinstate Ms Long-Bailey.

Richard Burgon, a former Shadow minister under Mr Corbyn, stated: “I don’t think she should’ve been sacked for sharing The Independent’s interview with Maxine Peake.”

John Trickett MP wondered “what has Sir Keir got against Northern socialists from working class backgrounds?” and implicitly described Ms Long-Bailey’s sacking a “provocation”.

Claudia Webbe MP complained that Labour should be more focused on calling for Cabinet ministers to be sacked.

Ian Lavery MP simply tweeted: “I support @RLong_Bailey.” In a video he urged Labour members to stay and “fight” the “new direction” in the Party.

Bell Ribeiro-Addy, who has herself courted controversy, said that she was “disappointed” with Ms Long-Bailey’s dismissal.

Clive Lewis chimed in as well, and so did Aspana Begum. Nadia Whittome called the departure of Ms Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet a “loss for our Party”.

Zarah Sultana, a new MP with one of the longest records of Jew-baiting statements, said that she was “disappointed” at the departure of Ms Long-Bailey.

Ms Long-Bailey herself revealed that she had learned nothing from the episode, reportedly saying that she understood why the claim made by Ms Peake had caused “extreme concern” but insisted that politicians should not shy away from talking about police brutality. “There is a valid concern about police practices across the world and I don’t think that, worded in the right way, it’s racist or antisemitic to draw attention to that,” she said, apparently unwilling or unable to grasp that her words still implied that the Jewish state has something to do with police brutality in the United States of America.

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on Sir Keir Starmer to discipline the MPs who have defended Ms Long-Bailey, at best turning a blind eye to the racism that she promoted, or in some cases disagreeing that there was anything wrong with her having done so. That they raised the matter of Israeli policy at their meeting with Sir Keir suggests the latter.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Plaid Cymru has now become implicated in the scandal around Labour’s Rebecca Long-Bailey, who shared an article containing an antisemitic trope, as the Welsh party’s former leader and one of its local councillors come to Ms Long-Bailey’s defence.

Ms Long-Bailey was sacked for sharing an article in which the actress Maxine Peake claimed that Israel was to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd, an antisemitic trope. Ms Peake is reported in The Independent to have said: “The tactics used by the police in America, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck, that was learnt from seminars with Israeli secret services.”

Ms Wood, the former Plaid Cymru leader, asked: “If criticism of Israel’s government is antisemitism, is criticism of the Saudi Arabian regime Islamophobia / racism? Need to be clear on this, as I am a critic of the leadership of both of these countries & want to be neither antisemitic nor Islaphophobic [sic].” She then tweeted an Amnesty USA article that several far-left outriders have suggested evidences the conspiracy theory that Israel is linked to the death of Mr Floyd, even though the article itself makes no such claim and Amnesty International released a statement explicitly denying any linkage between Israel the death of Mr Floyd. As we have explained, the claim of a linkage between Israel and Mr Floyd’s death have nothing to do with Israeli policy.

Ms Wood posted further tweets linking to the Amnesty International statement and a Twitter thread that helped to explain why the link is antisemitic. But she did not apologise, instead only expressing gratitude for the “context”.

Meanwhile, Steve Collings, a Plaid Cymru local councillor in Gwynedd, which is the only local authority in the country controlled by Plaid Cymru, also came to Ms Long-Bailey’s defence.

In an extended Facebook post, Mr Collings wrote: “Maxine Peake made the accusation that the Israeli apartheid state trained the US police to use the deadly tactics that were used to kill George Floyd. She said this as part of the wider point that racism is an international phenomenon which is not limited to one country or regime.” He described the evidence of such a claim as “circumstantial” and the efforts to show why the claim is antisemitic as a “counter-attack” that “focuses on proving whether or not that ‘exact’ tactic was ‘taught’, and if it wasn’t anyone drawing this connection outlined above is an antisemitic conspiracy theorist and hates Jews.”

He went on to draw an analogy equating Israel with ISIS and Hamas, two genocidal antisemitic terrorist organisations, and said that there is a double standard in how this has been reported versus how it would be reported if it involved a Muslim protagonist.

Given the inexactitude of Mr Collings’ analogy, it is difficult to understand what his ramblings achieved other than to make the offensive and antisemitic equation of the Jewish state with racist genocidal terror groups that are obsessed with the annihilation of Jews.

We are grateful to a concerned member of the public for bringing Mr Collings’ post to our attention.

This is not Plaid Cymru’s first foray into antisemitic discourse. Earlier this year a Party activist who was suspended over antisemitism was reinstated with no sanction and was due to stand as a candidate for the Party in elections for the Welsh Assembly.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Plaid Cymru will now be under pressure to act after two of its leading politicians have come to the defence of Rebecca Long-Bailey, whom Sir Keir Starmer has demonstrated has no place in his Shadow Cabinet. Plaid Cymru will have to decide if its standards are level to Labour’s or not.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Tahir Ali, a new Labour MP, has become the second last of all sitting MPs to sign up to the International Definition of Antisemitism, according to the All Party Group Against Antisemitism, which organised the campaign. But he reportedly only did so in the presence of the Opposition Chief Whip, which suggests the Labour Party may have placed him under significant pressure.

Mr Ali was recently discovered to have been a member of a Facebook group backing Rebecca Long-Bailey for the leadership of the Labour Party – a group replete with antisemitic material.

Mr Ali’s signature means that of all the sitting MPs only Labour’s Grahame Morris has declined to sign the Definition.

Sinn Fein’s seven MPs have also not signed up, but they do not take their seats in Parliament.

Signing up to the Definition is an important first step in tackling antisemitism, however the Definition must now be used and appropriate policies adopted and implemented by all public bodies, local authorities and universities in order to combat anti-Jewish hatred.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

The leader of the Social Democratic Party (SDP) has retweeted a video referencing a ‘New World Order’ and the Rothschilds, two tropes commonly associated with antisemitism.

William Clouston, who became leader of the minor party in 2018, retweeted a video in which a British man reads a poem called “The Right to Hate”. The caption in the tweet that Mr Clouston retweeted said: “This man is absolutely nailed on with this. Some really powerful points in this.”

Although Mr Clauston’s Twitter biography says “RTs [retweets] are not endorsements,” in this case it is difficult to understand how it could be anything other than an endorsement as there are no other tweets providing any other explanation.

The poem is dedicated to “all those globalists out there” and criticises the “global New World Order”. The poem’s narrator also complains of being called an antisemite but insists that “the Rothschilds are the richest banking family in this world and that’s got nothing to do with them being Jewish and everything to do with them being multi-billionaires who really do influence the dollar, pound and yen.”

The video was also shared by the SDP’s official North East account.

Campaign Against Antisemitism advocates for zero tolerance of antisemitism in public life. To that end we monitor all political parties and strive to ensure that any cases of concern are properly addressed.

Rebecca Long-Bailey was sacked for sharing an article in which the actress Maxine Peake claimed that Israel was to blame for the racist killing of George Floyd. Ms Peake is reported in The Independent to have said: “The tactics used by the police in America, kneeling on George Floyd’s neck, that was learnt from seminars with Israeli secret services.”

Some people are wondering why this claim is antisemitic.

The idea that American police officers learned the techniques that caused Mr Floyd’s death from their Israeli counterparts is popular on the far-left. Sometimes reference has even been made to an Amnesty USA article that some, including the rapper Lowkey, the columnist Owen Jones, Novara Media’s Aaron Bastani and the expelled Labour member and antisemite Jackie Walker, understood to be evidencing the theory. In its interview with Ms Peake, The Independent also referenced the article, but mistakenly attributed it to Amnesty International.

However, not only did the Amnesty USA article not say that American police forces had learned specific policing techniques from Israel — merely that American police train with Israeli police, as police forces across the world do — but Amnesty International released a statement explicitly denying any linkage between Israel the death of Mr Floyd, saying that “the precise nature of the training offered to US police forces by Israeli officials is not something we’ve documented. Allegations that US police were taught tactics of ‘neck kneeling’ by Israeli secret services is not something we’ve ever reported and the article in question has rightly been amended to acknowledge that.”

The architect of the bilateral training programmes between American and Israeli police forces has also rejected the theory as “not only false, but dangerous,” elaborating to say: “Despite suggestions to the contrary, there is no field training involved in either the conferences or trips, and no training on holds or arrest mechanics. The exchanges, which are hosted by the Israel National Police, focus on effective techniques in thwarting terrorism. Participants learn how Israeli law enforcement deters, disrupts, and responds to terrorist attacks. They explore the ideology of suicide bombers and other attackers, ways to de-escalate an ongoing incident, and the intelligence-gathering and -sharing process.”

The theory is, therefore, without evidence, and accordingly a conspiracy.

Conspiracy theories make people stupid, because they allow them to believe stupid ideas — in this case that the Jewish state invented kneeling on people’s necks and taught American police how it is done — and to believe those stupid ideas in the absence of evidence.

This particular conspiracy theory is antisemitic, because it observes an evil — police brutality or systemic racism in the United States — and looks to link it with Israel, in order to associate the Jews through the Jewish state with that evil. Moreover, for antisemites, associating a phenomenon with Jews not only makes Jews look bad but can also make the phenomenon itself seem worse.

The conspiracy theory has also regrettably tied into revolting claims that Jewish interests and the interests of the black community are somehow at odds or that fighting antisemitism might itself be racist against black people — claims that have repeatedly been made by far-left MPs in the Labour Party.

Some understood the condemnation of the conspiracy theory linking the death of Mr Floyd to Israel as showing that criticism of Israel is silenced by claims of antisemitism, for example by Leanne Wood, the former leader of Plaid Cymru. The Communist activist Ash Sarkar also said that the “disgraceful decision” to fire Ms Long-Bailey from the Shadow Cabinet “undermines the position the Labour Party has insisted on all along that it’s possible to criticise Israeli policy without being antisemitic. Shameful, shameful stuff.”

But the linkage of Mr Floyd’s death to Israel is not criticism of Israeli policy. It is criticism of American police brutality or systemic racism in the United States that unnecessarily — and, as we have seen, baselessly — blames the Jewish state for that evil. It has nothing to do with Israel or Israeli policy and serves only (and deliberately) to tarnish Israel by attaching it to a foreign evil entirely unrelated to it.

It is antisemitic.

Justice, justice, you shall pursue - צדק צדק תרדף
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