The University of Warwick has been condemned by Andrew Percy MP in the House of Commons for refusing to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Percy, who co-chairs the All Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, urged public bodies to adopt the Definition in comments in Parliament last week, saying that “this applies to universities as well where we have a big problem with antisemitism on campuses”. In particular, he singled out “universities like Warwick, whose Vice-Chancellor is refusing to sign up” to the Definition.

The Vice-Chancellor declined to adopt the Definition because it did not offer “any added value,” declaring that the university would not “formally adopt individual definitions of specific forms of discriminatory behaviour.” The Vice-Chancellor explained that “to adopt one would inevitably lead to the adoption of a whole series of such definitions.” The university, however, would be “mindful” of the Definition.

The decision was criticised by the Warwick Jewish Israeli Society, which, following Mr Percy’s comments, reiterated its call on the university to adopt the Definition. The president of the Society said that the reference to the university’s refusal to adopt the Definition in the House of Commons “is a damning indictment of our university”, adding: “Enough is enough. The university should finally listen to Jewish students and adopt the Definition without delay.”

The university’s Students’ Union also criticised the Vice-Chancellor’s decision, noting that the university has adopted a “revamped Sexual Misconduct policy” because “it was widely agreed that a specific definition of sexual misconduct was a given for an effective process to be formulated.” It concluded that “we cannot therefore place our trust in the university to take racism seriously – particularly in the area of discipline – without an equally specific definition of what racial discrimination actually entails. It is unacceptable for victims of racism to constantly have to explain and unpack their experiences in order to be taken seriously.”

It is understood that negotiations on the matter at the University of Warwick will continue.

Robert Jenrick, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has made several calls on universities, as well as local councils, to adopt the Definition, warning that those that do not may be named and shamed and have their funding cut.The Universities Minister, Chris Sikdmore, has also called on universities to adopt the Definition.

Baroness Deech has warned political leaders against “passive acts of commemoration” on Holocaust Memorial Day, calling instead for them “to commit to protecting Jewish communities from violence and hatred.”

Writing in The House magazine, Baroness Deech noted that “the Holocaust is a collective trauma for the Jewish people. The unbearable knowledge of what occurred has affected, informed and inspired Jews and the State of Israel.” However, she warned that Holocaust Memorial Day “must be about more than remembrance: it must be about action.”

Baroness Deech, who is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, observed the appalling rise in antisemitic crime. Indeed Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

She also noted the full statutory investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) into antisemitism in the Labour Party, which is the largest political party in Europe. The EHRC launched its investigation on 28th May 2019 following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

While recognising the importance of commemorating the crimes of the past, Baroness Deech stipulated that world leaders much also “commit to concrete action to fight antisemitism and redouble their efforts to stem the resurgence of race hatred in Western countries.”

“Substantive steps,” she suggested, might include wider adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism, including at universities, more funding and training to secure Jewish communal institutions, and more resources for education “about the Jewish story in order to inoculate against antisemitism before it starts.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism joins Baroness Deech in calling for #ActionNotWords in the commemoration of antisemitism in the past and the fight against its resurgence today.

The Sheffield branch of the University and College Union (UCU) has been criticised for holding an event to mark Holocaust Memorial Day featuring a controversial Jewish academic who holds unrepresentative views regarding the International Definition of Antisemitism.

The event was in fact billed as an evaluation of the Definition. The speaker was Brian Klug, a Senior Research Fellow at St Benet’s Hall, University of Oxford, who defended the Labour Party’s unacceptable substitute for the Definition.

Among the critics was Holocaust survivor and founder trustee of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, Agnes Grunwald-Spier MBE, who insisted that she was “not raising the issue…because I object to controversial views being expressed in a university – on the contrary,” but rather because Dr Klug is reportedly opposed to the adoption of the Definition by universities – “a very useful tool in controlling hate speech against Jews” – his opinions will not be balanced at the event and it is inappropriate to use Holocaust Memorial Day to promote divisive views. “I also object,” she said, “to a day which is supposed to reflect on the lessons of the Holocaust and to remember the many victims of the Nazis and subsequent genocides being hijacked in this manner.”

UCU has a very negative reputation in the Jewish community, resulting from a poor record when it comes to fighting antisemitism, including refusing to adopt the Definition, repeatedly endorsing the antisemitism-riddled Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against the Jewish State (the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of British Jews find intimidating) and fighting a legal battle against a Jewish academic who unsuccessfully sued UCU for breach of the Equality Act 2010.

Most recently, in October, the union sent an e-mail to secretaries of local branches encouraging them to mark Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January and providing a near-exhaustive list of minority groups persecuted by the Nazis — but failing to include the Jews.

Labour leadership hopeful Emily Thornberry has praised Jeremy Corbyn for “always calling out those people who play the race card” at a Holocaust Memorial Day event.

Speaking at an event at Islington Assembly Hall to an audience that included fellow local MP Mr Corbyn, Ms Thornberry advised that it was not just the pupils present who needed to learn the lessons of history, but also the “adults, especially the politicians amongst us.”

Mr Corbyn also addressed the ceremony, describing how “the Nazi Party rose to power and how they murdered six million Jewish people along with all the travellers and gypsies they could, along with lesbian and gay people.”

A Holocaust survivor, Hana Kleiner, lamented in Mr Corbyn’s presence “the current rise of antisemitism” and blasted Holocaust denial “in the face of all the documented evidence”.

The Mayor of Islington, Cllr Rakhia Ismail, mentioned the “need to hold politicians to account” over genocides around the world, but suggested that it was “Number 10 (Downing Street) and America or other parts of the world” who were guilty of “supporting blindly” contemporary genocides.

Other politicians were unimpressed with the political speeches. Dame Margaret Hodge MP, said: “If it wasn’t so serious, this would be a joke. I think Emily Thornberry needs to reflect on the reality before she makes statements like that.”

Ian Austin, the former Labour MP who resigned from Labour over antisemitism and is an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “It’s easy to speak about racism at a Holocaust commemoration.  But their words would have much more weight if the Labour Party had not been poisoned by racism against Jewish people under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership. He could start to make amends by booting out the racists and apologising for his responsibility for this scandal before he stands down.”

The event comes after Mr Corbyn appeared to back Rebecca Long-Bailey, long viewed as the “continuity candidate”, for the leadership, describing her as “our candidate for leader” at a political event. Mr Corbyn’s aides suggested that the Party leader had not intended to formally endorse Ms Long-Bailey.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which was equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders in the 2019 general election. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament accounted for 82 percent of all incidents.

Rory Stewart has described the significance of Holocaust Memorial Day as “eternal”, and that the Holocaust “shines a light on how even in perceived metropolis liberal cities…scapegoating, racism and prejudice can result in the greatest of human horrors. It makes us see how seemingly ordinary people can evolve into an evil kind. It makes us see how quickly political rhetoric and posturing can become murder.”

The former Conservative MP turned independent candidate for the London mayoralty, also described the Shoah as “the darkest period in the history of mankind.”

Writing in the JC, Mr Stewart insisted that “the threat of antisemitism remains live and real. It is seen now in Britain not only among the far-left and the far-right.”

He said that “Holocaust Memorial Day must forever remain an essential part of this country’s educational calendar.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

All Members of Parliament have reportedly signed up to the International Definition of Antisemitism, with the exception of Labour’s Graham Stringer, Tahir Ali, Andy McDonald and Grahame Morris, apparently “despite repeated attempts to contact them,” according to the All Party Group Against Antisemitism, which organised the campaign.

Sinn Fein’s seven MPs, who do not take their seats in Parliament, have also not signed up.

The welcome near-unanimity of the House of Commons on how to define and identify antisemitism is a turnaround from the summer of 2018, when Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party, including at least one current leadership contender, opposed the Party’s adoption of the Definition.

Signing up to the Definition is an important first step in tackling antisemitism, however the Definition must now be used and appropriate policies adopted and implemented by all public bodies, local authorities and universities in order to combat anti-Jewish hatred.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that 42% of British Jews have considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics, and close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

UPDATE: Andy McDonald MP has now reportedly signed up to the Definition (28.01.2020).

Photographs taken by the Duchess of Cambridge of Holocaust survivors with their descendants have been pre-released to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

The photographs, taken at Kensington Palace earlier this month, will feature in an exhibition of powerful images to open later this year. The Duchess is known to be a keen photographer.

Each portrait depicts the relationship between a survivor and younger generations of their family.

The Duchess reportedly spent time with the two survivors she photographed, saying that despite “unbelievable trauma at the start of their lives” they were “two of the most life-affirming people” she had met, and that “they look back on their experiences with sadness but also with gratitude that they were some of the lucky few to make it through.”

She added that “their stories will stay with me forever,” and that “it is vital that their memories are preserved and passed on to future generations, so that what they went through will never be forgotten.”

She wanted the “deeply personal” portraits to be a “celebration” of family and the life that they have built since immigrating to Britain in the 1940s.

The Duchess credited Anne Frank as one of the “underlying inspirations” behind the photographs, saying that she was particularly drawn by the young victim’s “sensitive and intimate” interpretation of the Holocaust.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge participated, along with other prominent figures, in a national commemorative event in Westminster yesterday. HRH Prince Chalres joined world leaders in Jerusalem last week, while the Duchess of Cornwall and Lord Pickles represented the UK at Auschwitz.

Boris Johnson has written, to mark the Holocaust, of how “it is so important that those of us who remain continue to remember.”

Writing in the Jewish News, the Prime Minister warned against Holocaust denial: “Because even though the Shoah was a crime so unprecedented it required the creation of a new word – genocide – simply to describe it, its perpetrators wished for it to be left unnoticed by the history books. Despite their enthusiastic participation in the slaughter, they didn’t want the world to know what they had done. They wanted us to forget.

“Today, a growing number of antisemites seek to continue that dismal work. They downplay the scale of the killing, draw false equivalence with the contemporary world, even outright deny that what happened, happened. We cannot let them gain a foothold. Because if we allow the likes of Buchenwald, Belsen and Babi Yar to become simply obscure names on a map, we not only betray the memory of those who died there.”

Mr Johnson reassured readers that “as long as I am prime minister, I will never allow this country to forget what happened 75 years ago. I will do all I can to see that we continue to learn the lessons of the past.”

He also declared that “the government I lead will stand with you and fight alongside you so that the darkest of nights is never again allowed to fall upon the Jews of the world.

“We owe those incredible survivors nothing less.”

An eleven-year-old Jewish girl, along with a four-year-old Jewish girl, were abused on Holocaust Memorial Day by a woman in the street who shouted at them: “I am going to cut your Jewish head off!”

The incident took place at 16:15 on 27th January on Moundfield Road in Stamford Hill and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD5856 27/01/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

To mark Holocaust Memorial Day, Campaign Against Antisemitism held an exclusive screening of Quezon’s Game, before its UK release date, with the director and leading cast members.

The award-winning film tells how Filipino President Manuel L. Quezon risked his career, his health and his country’s relationship with the United States in order to rescue more than 1,200 imperilled Jews from Nazi persecution at a time when most countries were turning Jewish refugees away.

The screening, at an Everyman cinema in London, was followed by an intimate discussion with the director, Matthew Rosen, and two leading cast members, about how the film was conceived and produced, as well as the reception of the film in the Phillipines and elsewere, and Filipino awareness of the Holocaust and other matters of Jewish and humanitarian interest.

To hear more about Campaign Against Antisemitism’s educational events, please subscribe to our mailing list at antisemitism.uk/act.

Andrew Percy, the MP who leads the All Party Parliamentary Group on Antisemitism, has criticised both major parties for tolerating a “disgusting rise in antisemitism tropes”.

Speaking last week during the Holocaust Memorial Day debate in the House of Commons, Mr Percy warned the Conservatives, of which he is a member, against engaging in conspiracies involving the wealthy Jewish activist financier, George Soros, explaining that “the Nazis treated Jews as vermin but also alleged that they had a plan for world domination. Sadly, the Soros conspiracy theories we see, which are prevalent on the far-right of politics, are simply an updated version of that disgusting ideology. Using George Soros’s Jewish heritage and puppet-master imagery is antisemitic.”

During the general election, the Conservatives suspended one parliamentary candidate and investigated at least three others over allegations of antisemitism.

Turning to Labour, Mr Percy noted, “sadly, that on the Labour benches – some 30 of the Party’s candidates at the recent election were accused of antisemitism – there is more work to be done to counter anti-Jewish racism.”

He continued: “As I have said previously, it brings shame on this country’s whole body politic that, sadly, this disgusting ideology has been at the heart of British politics and mainstreamed in recent years,” adding: “l am sad in one way, but proud in another, that when I knocked on the doors of working-class communities in my area at the election, people referenced the current rise in antisemitism as a concern. 

“We do not have a big Jewish community. I think that I am one of three Jewish constituents. We may be heading for a minyan [ten Jewish men], but there are certainly not many of us. It was sad but also reassuring to hear people in my area reference the need to do more on this at the recent election. I am very proud of the people in my area for standing as resolutely as they have.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and showed that 42% of British Jews have considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics, and close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Renee Salt, who was imprisoned in Auschwitz as a young teenager, remained silent about her experiences for 50 years, but is speaking out now as she says “antisemitism is very bad now”.

“For fifty years I couldn’t talk about it,” she says, but “the nightmares only stopped once we started talking about it.”

Ms Salt says that she was urged to talk about her experiences because she was advised that “if you won’t people won’t know what happened,” and she felt that “it should never happen again.”

When asked whether she thinks the sort of antisemitism she witnessed in her younger years is possible again, she replied: “Absolutely the antisemitism is very bad now. We didn’t expect it to happen again. But there you are.”

As for Holocaust deniers, “I would like to take them to Auschwitz and show them what happened…but I think they know what happened – it is too big to hide away.”

The interview can be watched here.

Robert Jenrick, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, has revealed that, further to his calls on them to do so, only 136 of the 343 local authorities in England had agreed to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Mr Jenrick has also announced that those councils expressly refusing to adopt the Definition would be named in the coming weeks and that they can expect to lose public funding if they failed to tackle antisemitism.

He said that he has “been clear that all universities and local councils…must adopt” the Definition, adding that “it is shocking that some still haven’t, demonstrating a serious lack of respect for this issue.”

“I will shortly publish the list of those councils that have told my department that they will adopt the Definition and those who have explicitly refused to do so. Organisations like these should not expect to receive public money if they cannot demonstrate that they are fighting antisemitism.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism praises Mr Jenrick’s announcement and his recognition that remembrance of the Holocaust must be acommpanied by action against antisemitism today.

Mr Jenrick’s announcement comes as the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Warwick is under fire for refusing to adopt the Definition.

Meanwhile, the Government is providing a fund of £500,000 to pay for 150 student leaders to hear from Holocaust survivors and visit Auschwitz every year, with a view to sharing their experiences with 24,000 other students over the next three years. The fund will reportedly expand a scheme that identified 30 English universities reporting a high level of antisemitism or racism.

The Government is also providing £1 million to the Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation to mark 75 years since the liberation of the camps, in addition to £300,000 pledged by the Mayor of London.

Pope Francis used his weekly address and blessing to tens of thousands of people in St. Peter’s Square yesterday to call for prayer and reflection over the Holocaust, while Muslim clergy have made a groundbreaking visit to Auschwitz to commemorate the victims.

The Pope said: “Indifference is inadmissible before this enormous tragedy, this atrocity, and memory is a duty. Tomorrow [on Holocaust Memorial Day], we are all invited to stop for a moment of prayer and reflection, each one of us saying in our own heart: ‘never again, never again’.” 

The Pope has also ordered the opening of the Vatican’s WWII archives, which Jewish groups have been requesting for years, and last week called the rise in antisemitism today a “barbaric resurgence”.

Meanwhile, a group led by the Secretary-General of the Muslim World League, Dr Mohammad bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, has been taking part in the commemorations at the Nazi extermination camp.

Dr Al-Issa, who is based in Saudi Arabia, led a group described as “the most senior Islamic leadership delegation” ever to visit Auschwitz, comprising 62 Muslims from 28 countries, including 25 prominent religious leaders.

Dr Al-Issa said: “To be here, among the children of Holocaust survivors and members of the Jewish and Islamic communities, is both a sacred duty and a profound honor,” adding: “The unconscionable crimes to which we bear witness today are truly crimes against humanity. That is to say, a violation of us all, an affront to all of God’s children.”

In a powerful opinion editorial in the UK, Dr Al-Issa wrote: “The Holocaust is truly the most horrific crime in human history, in which six million Jews perished at the hands of Hitler’s Nazi regime simply because they were Jews.

“This crime shook humankind. Only the malicious sympathise with it. These people are no less barbaric than the Nazis themselves, in terms of malevolence and brutality. Those who deny the Holocaust are equally criminal.”

He added: “I say that we Muslims condemn, in the strongest terms, what happened in the Holocaust, and express our sorrow and sadness at what we consider to be a crime of unparalleled proportions in human history.”

The BBC stands by the desecration of the Holocaust by its International Correspondent, Orla Guerin, as former Corporation executives describe it as “unjustifiably offensive”.

Ms Guerin appallingly used a primetime segment on the BBC’s flagship News at Ten programme to link the murder of six million Jews in the Holocaust to Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians. According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic.

However, a spokesman for the BBC has retorted: “The brief reference in our Holocaust report to Israel’s position today did not imply any comparison between the two and nor would we want one to be drawn from our coverage.” That inference, however, is precisely what viewers would make from the segment.

Danny Cohen, the former Director of Television at the BBC, slammed the BBC for its refusal to apologise, calling it a “deeply offensive lapse in judgment.”

Mr Cohen described the segment as “unnecessary, insensitive and particularly ugly in the days before Holocaust Memorial Day. Adding insult to injury, the report uses pictures of Holocaust victims in Yad Veshem during the sequence in which this link is made. This is inexplicably and unjustifiably offensive.” He also rubbished the BBC’s defence that there was no comparison between Israel and the Nazis in the report: “This is a difficult argument to sustain,” he said, “when the two elements appear in the very same sentence in the report.”

The former chairman of the BBC, Michael Grade, also expressed outrage at the statement from the BBC. “I think it was shocking,” he said. “When the BBC are under criticism they hide behind anodyne, anonymous quotes from a spokesman. Where is the senior editorial figure coming out to speak and face up to this? The BBC is operating under a complete double standard.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has made an official complaint to the BBC, which is a necessary precursor to making a complaint to Ofcom, the broadcasting regulator. We are waiting for a response.

Antisemitic graffiti was found spray-painted in South-East London just prior to Holocaust Memorial Day.

The graffiti, featuring a swastika and the sun cross symbol used by white supremacists, were daubed on a Caribbean takeaway in Greenwich, while Stars of David and the word “Jews” were sprayed on a Barclays Bank half a mile away in Blackheath.

The graffiti is believed to have been painted between 22:00 and 23:00 on Saturday 25th January, and has now been removed.

The Greenwich Council leader described the vandalism as “totally appalling and horrific” and reported that local residents were “worried and upset by what had happened”.

A police spokesperson said: “Officers are investigating a report of antisemitic and racist graffiti…Enquiries are ongoing and if you have any information that could help the investigation please call 101 and quote CAD340/26Jan.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Two eleven-year-old girls were subjected to antisemitic abuse on the eve of Holocaust Memorail Day, when a man shouted at them: “Hitler was the best, he was right, we hate Jews.”

The girls ran home in terror.

The incident took place yesterday, on 26th January, in Stamford Hill, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD2465 26/01/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

The Government has said that it will investigate educational material for children comparing Gaza to Holocaust, in breach of International Definition of Antisemitism.

The material – a course titled ‘Genocide Memorial Day’ – is recommended for children aged twelve and over, and was reportedly designed and circulated by a controversial pro-Iranian charity known as the Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC). The material was reportedly uploaded to the respected TES digital educational service, an open resource platform for teachers formerly known as the Times Educational Supplement, and also emailed to educators across the country in January.

The material makes repeated equations between the Nazi treatment of the Jews and Israeli Government policy. It also describes the “Israeli assault on Gaza” in 2009 as a genocide and includes images of Hamas flags. Hamas is proscribed as a terrorist organisation and seeks the genocide of all Jews worldwide.

A one-minute video produced by the IHRC promoting ‘Genocide Memorial Day’ also minimises the Jewish element of the Holocaust, such as by referring to the “eleven million victims of the Nazi Holocaust.” Alongside the Holocaust it also lists what it describes as genocides in Gaza.

The Definition says that “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is an example of antisemitism.

The IHRC’s ‘Genocide Memorial Day’ is to be marked on the third Sunday in January in a brazen attempt to conflate it with and undermine Holocaust Memorial Day. This is not the first attempt to do so. Labour’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn, and the Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, also tried to convert Holocaust Memorial Day into ‘Genocide Memorial Day’ in 2011 when they were both backbenchers.

One leading Holocaust educational campaigner accused the IHRC, through its material, of “using false equivocations of the Holocaust and deliberately conflating, downgrading and revising the Holocaust.”

Brandon Lewis, the Immigration Minister, called the revelation “stark and concerning” and promised to ‘follow up directly” on the matter with a parliamentary colleague in order to ensure that it “gets the proper attention”.

The IHRC is also behind the Al Quds Day marches in London, where Hizballah flags have been displayed and antisemitic statements have been made, such as blaming “Zionists” for the Grenfell fire disaster. Hizballah is an antisemitic genocidal terrorist organisation that has been proscribed and recently had its assets frozen by the British Government.

Last week, world leaders gathered in Jerusalem for an event entitled “Remembering the Holocaust, Fighting Antisemitism.” Organised by the World Holocaust Forum Foundation with Yad Vashem, under the auspices of the President of Israel, the gathering was arranged to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day today, which is the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

The purpose of the event, President Rivlin explained, was to “think about how to pass on Holocaust remembrance to generations who will live in a world without survivors, and what steps we must take to ensure the safety and security of Jews — all around the world.”

President Rivlin is right to link Holocaust remembrance with the security of Jews today — there is no point commemorating the Jews of the past while tolerating hatred against the Jews of the present.

Thanks to years of hard work by the Jewish community, successive British Governments have taken Holocaust education very seriously, and indeed our country sends more visitors to Auschwitz than any other.

But Holocaust education must be rigorous, and that means resisting the growing attempts to attribute it to abstract ills such as “prejudice” and “discrimination”. Antisemitism in the Holocaust was not a footnote: it was its core.

Holocaust denial must also be fought vigorously. This is particularly true in anticipation of a world without survivors. That’s why we at Campaign Against Antisemitism brought a private prosecution against the notorious Holocaust denier and antisemite, Alison Chabloz, when the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) refused to act.

Ms Chabloz wrote, recorded and publicised online songs denying the Holocaust and mocking its victims. Our action resulted in a landmark legal precedent, whereby Holocaust denial was deemed by the courts for the first time to be “grossly offensive” and therefore illegal when used as a means by which to hound Jews online. This groundbreaking ruling means that Holocaust denial, in certain circumstances, has become a crime in England for the first time.

Following our prosecution, Ms Chabloz was given a suspended sentence, the conditions of which she has since breached. She may therefore be sent to prison next month, pending an appeal.

This was not the only time we have been forced to act when the CPS would not. In July 2015, neo-Nazis sought to march through Golders Green. Due to our intervention, they were forced to gather in Westminster instead. At their rally, Jeremy Bedford-Turner claimed that Jews controlled the West, drank the blood of non-Jewish children and perpetrated the French Revolution and both World Wars, before demanding: “Let’s free England from Jewish control.”

For two years, the CPS blocked our efforts to have Mr Bedford-Turner prosecuted, insisting that no crime had been committed. We understand that the then-Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), Alison Saunders, personally interceded to overrule a senior prosecutor who had advised that the CPS should initiate a prosecution.

We took the CPS to court to subject its decision to judicial review and won, forcing the CPS to prosecute. In a victory for the Jewish community and a deserved humiliation for the DPP and CPS, a jury unanimously found Mr Bedford-Turner guilty of incitement and he was sentenced to a year’s imprisonment.

These are not isolated occurrences. Our analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group. Yet prosecution rates against antisemitic criminals remain low.

We, along with the radio station LBC, referred a secret Labour dossier of antisemitic incidents among Party activists to the Metropolitan Police back in September 2018. The Met’s Commissioner, Cressida Dick, revealed earlier this month that six arrests were made in early 2019 — the only arrests made in connection with Labour antisemitism — and that five case files were passed to the CPS in September 2019.

Despite the passage of several months, the CPS has yet to make a decision on whether to charge the activists, despite a former DPP declaring that he believes that the criminal threshold was met. We will continue pursuing these cases to ensure that the CPS does not run down the clock until it is too late for charges to be brought.

The problems in the Labour Party are well known. But as some leading figures in the Party now fall over themselves to say all the right things (others are less repentant), we will continue to hold them to account, including through our work as complainant in the ongoing investigation by the Equality and Human Rights Commission into Labour antisemitism.

Many Holocaust survivors have dedicated their lives to education by retelling their experiences. Others sought to ensure that antisemites suffered the consequences of their actions. Education and deterrence go hand in hand; without one, the other is doomed to failure. We must educate against antisemitism and we must ensure there are ruinous consequences for those who seek to do us harm.

As Holocaust survivors pass the baton to us to continue their work, we accept our solemn responsibility.

(This article was first published, in a slightly adapted form, in the Jewish Telegraph this weekend.)

A man screamed “Hitler did a great job in Auschwitz by killing all the Jews” at several Jewish pedestrians on Cazenove Road in Stamford Hill.

As the world spends the week commemorating the liberation of Auschwitz and preparing to mark Holocaust Memorial Day, antisemitism expressed with reference to the Holocaust endures.

The incident took place at 12:15 on 23rd January and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD3104 23/01/2020.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other faith group.

Jeremy Corbyn has audaciously referenced the “horrors of the past” in comments in Parliament on the Holocaust that are insulting to the Jewish community.

The Labour leader told MPs: “Next Monday we will be commemorating National Holocaust [Memorial] Day. It’s a time for us all to reflect on the horrors of the past and remind us of the evils of Nazism, genocide, antisemitism and indeed all forms of racism which we must always all be implacably determined to root out wherever it appears.”

The remarks were particularly audacious, given that Mr Corbyn has spent his time in office cultivating antisemitism in the Labour Party — quite the opposite of working to “root it out wherever it appears”.

Moreover, on Holocaust Memorial Day in 2010, Mr Corbyn hosted and chaired an antisemitic event that compared Israeli policy to that of the Nazis, in contravention of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A year later, on Holocaust Memorial Day 2011, John McDonnell, a fellow beckbench MP who would go on to serve as Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, and Mr Corbyn himself respectively proposed and seconded an Early Day Motion in Parliament calling for the word “Holocaust” in the name of the day to be replaced with “Genocide”, thereby removing its particular signifiance for Jews.

Given Mr Corbyn’s record and his consistent refusal to address the institutional antisemitism in his Party, much less learn the lessons of the Holocaust more generally, his remarks on “the horrors of the past” is empty and hollow.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which was equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders in the 2019 general election. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament accounted for 82 percent of all incidents.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The former Labour MP Ian Austin, who resigned from the Party over antisemitism, has won a “Backbencher of the Year award” at The Spectator’s annual Parliamentarian of the Year awards last night.

As the son of a Holocaust refugee whose entire family was slaughtered by the Nazis in the Treblinka extermination camp, Mr Austin’s upbringing instilled in him a firm sense of justice and the determination to fight bigotry wherever he saw it. As an MP, he led a successful campaign to drive the far-right British National Party out of his Dudley North constituency, and then served as a leading figure in the fight against antisemitism that has taken hold in the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn, ultimately resigning from the Party in disgust earlier this year.

During this year, Mr Austin also helped found a new campaign called Mainstream, which is “designed to encourage a return to respectable and responsible politics, and to banish extremism from British politics once and for all.”

CAA congratulates Mr Austin, whom we are proud to have as one of our honorary patrons, on this highly deserved accolade.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

HRH Prince Charles has said today that the “magnitude of the genocide that was visited upon the Jewish people defies comprehension” as he joins world leaders in Jerusalem to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Prince Charles elaborated, saying: “The scale of the evil was so great, the impact so profound, that it threatens to obscure the countless individual, human stories of tragedy, loss and suffering of which it was comprised. That is why places like [Yad Vashem] and events like this are so vitally important.”

The Prince of Wales revealed that it has been a “singular privilege” for him to have met so many Holocaust survivors who came to the UK and made immeasureable contributions, noting that, as fewer and fewer of them are among us, “we must commit ourselves to ensuring that their stories live on.” He also noted the propriety of holding the commemorative event in Israel, where so many survivors made their home.

He also reflected on his “immense pride” in his grandmother, Princess Alice of Greece, who saved a Jewish family in 1943 by hiding them in her home. She is buried on the Mount of Olives, has a tree in her name at Yad Vashem and is counted among the Righteous of the Nations, “a fact,” he said, “that gives me and my family immense pride.”

We “compound” the “tragedy” of the Holocaust, the Prince explained, “if we do not heed its lessons.” He therefore urged: “On this day, in this place, and in memory of the millions who perished in the Shoah [the Holocaust], let us recommit ourselves to tolerance and respect, and to ensuring that those who lived through this darkness will forever, as in the words of the prophet Isiah, ‘be a light unto the nations’ to guide the generations that follow.

The full speech can be watched below.

The speech, which incorporated numerous references to biblical and rabbinic writings, was part of an event titled “Remembering the Holocaust, Fighting Antisemitism,” was organised by the World Holocaust Forum Foundation and Yad Vashem, Israel’s National Holocaust Memorial, under the auspices of the President of Israel. Also in attendance were the President and Prime Minister of Israel, the Presidents of Germany, Russia and France, and the Vice-President of the United States, among others, making it the largest diplomatic gathering in Israel’s history.

The purpose of the event, President Rivlin explained, was to “think about how to pass on Holocaust remembrance to generations who will live in a world without survivors, and what steps we must take to ensure the safety and security of Jews — all around the world.”

Orla Guerin, the BBC’s International Correspondent, has appallingly used a primetime segment on the BBC’s flagship News at Ten programme to link the murder of six million Jews in the Holocaust to Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians.

In a story ahead of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, directly after interviewing a Holocaust survivor whose entire family was murdered by Nazi Germany, Ms Guerin showed images of young Israelis who were performing their military service entering Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem. Ms Guerin narrated in the background, saying: “The State of Israel is now a regional power. For decades it has occupied Palestinian territories. But some here will always see their nation through the prism of persecution and survival.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism, adopted by the British Government, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemitic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism will now make an official complaint to the BBC, which is a necessary precursor to making a complaint to Ofcom, the broadcasting regulator.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “The BBC is supposed to inform the British public, not feed them propaganda. Few could imagine perverting what is supposed to be an educational piece about the Holocaust to instead fuel the very antisemitism that such education is supposed to prevent, but that is what the BBC has done. It was utterly appalling to watch Orla Guerin hijack a segment dedicated to remembering six million murdered Jews, and instead use it as a vehicle to desecrate the memory of the Holocaust with her hatred of the Jewish state. Ms Guerin and the BBC editors who allowed this to be aired must be made to face the consequences of this sick act, which is why we are now making an official complaint and will take the matter to Ofcom if necessary.”

The University of Warwick Students’ Union has released a passionate statement calling on the university to think again after Vice-Chancellor Professor Stuart Croft refused to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism because it does not offer “any added value.”

In its statement, the Warwick Students’ Union regretted that the university would not be adopting the Definition and would rely instead on the “framework of the values and principles developed over the past year to determine its response to allegations of racial discrimination and hate crime,” which the SU itself was “heavily involved” in producing.

However, the Students’ Union went on to note that “blanket terms like ‘values’ and ‘respect’ have always been subject to ambiguity and debate…[and do] not take into account the severity and nuance that often accompanies racial discrimination.” The SU further noted that “when working on the revamped Sexual Misconduct policy and procedures, it was widely agreed that a specific definition of sexual misconduct was a given for an effective process to be formulated.”

Similarly, the Students’ Union argued, “we cannot therefore place our trust in the University to take racism seriously – particularly in the area of discipline – without an equally specific definition of what racial discrimination actually entails. It is unacceptable for victims of racism to constantly have to explain and unpack their experiences in order to be taken seriously.”

The statement went on to observe that the Universities Minister wrote to all UK universities calling on them to implement the Definition in full, that the SU itself adopted it following a student vote in 2016, that the SU has lobbied the university to follow suit, that the National Union of Students and the Union of Jewish Students have also recommended its adoption, and that Universities UK, which represents institutions of higher education, has also called on universities to consider adopting the Definition. The SU therefore called again for “specific definitions of racial discrimination” to be adopted by the university.

In December, the University of Bristol adopted the Definition, after a controversial debate. University College London has also adopted the Definition, following a call on universities to adopt the Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, Robert Jenrick.

Antisemitism at universities has long been a major focus for Campaign Against Antisemitism, however this year we will elevate it to one of our three major national strategic priorities. This will include working with university administrations to persuade them to formally adopt the Definition.

A scandal has erupted at the Party branch of the new pro-Corbyn MP, Sam Tarry.

Last week, at the Cranbrook and Valentines branch of the Labour Party in Mr Tarry’s Ilford South constituency, a motion was carried declaring that there was “no antisemitism in the Labour Party” and attacking the Board of Deputies of British Jews as being “consistent in its support for the Conservative Party”, accusing it of “illegally interfering in the Labour leadership contest.”

Alex Holmes, the vice-chairman of the Ilford South Labour constituency who spoke against the motion, reported that he was labelled an “agent of a foreign power” for doing so and described the gathering as “the worst Labour meeting I have ever attended.”

Three councillors condemned the motion and the atmosphere, saying: “Last night Cranbrook and Valentines Branch Labour Party passed a motion that minimised the scourge of antisemitism in the Labour Party…There are reports that members who spoke against the motion were bullied and antisemitic tropes were used at the meeting. Let us be clear: we utterly condemn this motion and believe that all accusations of abuse and antisemitism should be investigated. There is no place for antisemitism in the Labour Party and we expect swift action to be taken against anyone responsible.”

Mr Tarry said that there were “conflicting accounts of what happened and what was said” and described the allegations as “very serious”, but did not go further. His failure to condemn the motion elicited significant criticism, with another Labour MP reportedly saying that this was Mr Tarry’s “first test since being elected on stamping out antisemitism in his local party” and concluded: “so far he is failing badly”.

Mr Tarry then clarified that, having seen the motion and spoken to members in attendance, he requested that “any complaints go through the Party’s formal channels to ensure that this matter is dealt with thoroughly and impartially.”

Local councillors in Redbridge Labour voted overwhelmingly for an investigation. 

It subsequently emerged that the authors of the motion were senior figures in Jewish Voice for Labour (JVL), a pro-Corbyn antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation: Diana Neslen, a member of JVL’s steering group, and Murray Glickman, a JVL founder.

Ms Nelsen apparently once defended the use of the word “Zio” to attack Jews, claiming that there were “connections between Zionists and antisemites throughout history,” and on another occasion wrote that “the lessons of the Holocaust is [sic] that all lives are worthy and since the Israelis learnt the wrong lesson their baubles no longer have any currency.” Mr Glickman, meanwhile, has authored an essay titled: “Is Right To Exist Denial Really Antisemitic?”

It then transpired that Ms Nelsen and Mr Glickman had originally nominated Mr Tarry to be the local parliamentary candidate in the first place. His selection as Labour’s candidate was also mired in controversy, as his main rival was reportedly suspended by Labour the night before voting was scheduled to take place in October, prompting his supporters to allege that the suspension was politically motivated in order to clear the path for Mr Tarry. The rival is now apparently taking legal action against the Labour Party.

Mr Tarry went on to win the seat in the general election and succeed Mike Gapes as the local MP for the area. Mr Gapes was a principled MP who resigned from the Labour Party over antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has committed £300,000 from London to the Auschwitz-Birkenau Foundation, which manages the site, in order “to help ensure that the horrors of the Holocaust are never forgotten.”

The grant will reportedly support the preservation of the gas chambers, crematoria, barracks and other exhibits. The UK sends the most international visitors to Auschwitz-Birkenau, with some 300,000 people, including schoolchildren, visiting each year.

The Mayor also confirmed that he would join commemorations at Auschwitz later this month marking the 75th anniversary of its liberation.

Mr Kahn observed that “the Holocaust was one of the darkest times in human history and we must never forget the atrocities committed,” adding: “These lessons are all the more significant as we see antisemitism and hate crime on the rise.”

However, Mr Khan also faces criticism for campaigning for Jeremy Corbyn to become Prime Minister, despite Mr Corbyn’s antisemitism. Mr Khan is the most senior elected Labour official in the country and remains in Labour despite its degeneration into institutional antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

A teenager who set a Jewish passenger’s hair on fire while using racist epithets has been sentenced by Highbury Corner Youth Court.

The incident took place shortly before 19:00 on 26th March 2018 on the number 210 bus, when the teenager and another male sat in front of and behind the victim, who was working no a laptop.

The teenager, who was fourteen at the time and cannot be named for legal reasons, asked the victim: “are you a P**i or a Jew?” He then proceeded to singe the victim’s hair and, when confronted by the victim, said: “Are you Jewish? You can’t be Jewish because you don’t have horns. Do Jews keep money under their caps?”

The teenager also threatened to beat up the victim and smash his computer.

Appearing at Highbury Corner Youth Court on 16th January 2020 after pleading guilty to racially and religiously aggravated common assault, the teenager was sentenced to a four-month youth rehabilitation order and ordered to write a letter of apology to the victim and pay him £100 in compensation. The fourth month of rehabilitation was due to the racist nature of the attack.

The teenager was given an activity requirement of eight hours and one-to-one behavioural sessions with educational staff to combat racial discrimination.

Speaking in the court, the teenager reportedly expressed remorse for the attack, saying he had changed and grown as a person since the incident. He noted that he had now moved house and made new friends, and that he was focused on his GCSEs with a view to going on to higher education.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has given an impassioned condemnation of antisemitism in comments to Parliament.

Responding to a question in the House of Commons about marking Holocaust Memorial Day with action rather than mere signatures in books, Mr Johnson expressed his desire to do “absolutely everything we can to stamp out the resurgence of antisemitism.”

The Prime Minister proceeded to observe that, “as someone who is now 55 years old, I find it absolutely incredible that in the 21st century we have antisemitism rising again in this country. It is a disgrace and we must stamp it out.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that 42% of British Jews have considered leaving the UK, of which 85% cited antisemitism in politics, and close to two thirds of British Jews believe that the authorities, in general, are not doing enough to address and punish antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

A controversial new Labour MP with a history of unseemly comments, including about Jews, is embroiled in yet another such scandal.

Zarah Sultana, newly elected to represent Coventry South (albeit with a drastically reduced majority), reportedly told a Jewish student that it was “privilege” that allowed them to argue for peace in the Middle East, saying: “it is your privilege that lets you speak on stage and call for peace.”

In social media posts dating back to her (recent) student days and since deleted, Ms Sultana said that students who “go to Zionist conferences and trips should be ashamed of themselves” because they were advocating a “racist ideology”, and described Israel as a “state created through ethnic cleansing”.

She also said that “those who lobby for Israel” would “in the near future feel the same shame and regret as South African Apartheid supporters.”

One Jewish student who studied at Birmingham University at the same time as Ms Sultana said: “Her whole raison d’etre was that Jewish students were basically privileged white people who had no right to speak out on racism or injustices” and that she and her peers “completely overstepped the mark” when they “routinely targeted Jewish students who objected to their way of thinking.”

Ms Sultana has already been caught in controversy over her adoption of the language of antisemitic genocidal terrorist groups in advocating for “violent resistance” against Israelis; saying that she would celebrate the deaths of Tony Blair and other past and present world leaders (for which she was forced to apologise and was defended by Labour frontbencher John McDonnell); writing that “the Labour Right are scum and genuinely make me sick. Is there any form of discrimination that they won’t weaponise to politically point score like they’ve done in the past with antisemitism and now with homophobia?”; and accusing Jewish students on social media of being on the payroll of Israel’s Prime Minister.

Ms Sultana is a supporter of Rebecca Long-Bailey’s candidacy for the leadership of the Labour Party, and spoke at Ms Long-Bailey’s campaign launch.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Jeremy Corbyn’s decision to include his controversial chief of staff, Karie Murphy, in his list of nominations for peerages is another insult to the Jewish community by the leader of the Labour Party.

Ms Murphy has been a central figure in the Labour leader’s office, which has presided over the descent of the Party into institutional antisemitism and undermined the Party’s disciplinary processes and investigations into antisemitism. Ms Murphy was instrumental in advocating for a Corbyn-led government, which would pose an existential threat to British Jewry.

Even Labour figures are sceptical of the propriety of appointing such a senior Party figure to the House of Lords while Labour is being investigated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) over antisemitism. On 28th May 2019, the EHRC launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Rewarding Ms Murphy and elevating her to a life peerage, thereby guaranteeing her presence on the front line of British politics for years to come, is a malicious act.

It has also been reported that Ms Murphy is to be given additional responsibilities within the Party.

Mr Corbyn has a history of questionable nominations to the House of Lords, including Shami Chakrabarti, who authored a report into antisemitism in the Party that was widely panned as a ‘whitewash’. Mr Corbyn nominated her for a peerage and then appointed her as his Shadow Justice Secretary.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Lord Mann, the Government’s independent advisor on antisemitism, has told football clubs to enhance their efforts to tackle antisemitism and racism in stadiums, warning that “I have a voice and it will get more brutal if they don’t.”

He made the remarks at the unveiling of a mural at Chelsea’s Stamford Bridge honouring three footballers imprisoned by the Nazis. The mural was designed by a British-Israeli artist as part of Chelsea’s ‘Say No To Antisemitism’ campaign.

Lord Mann told attendees: “If I thought doing this was a PR stunt I wouldn’t be here. It could have huge ramifications in the fight against hate. I want other premier league clubs to follow Chelsea’s lead and speak out. I have a voice and it will get more brutal if they don’t.”

Bruce Buck, the club’s chairman, said the club’s commitment to fighting anti-Jewish racism was “never ending” and had “no time frame”, adding: “Maybe if antisemitism stops we’ll stop – but that’s not likely in our lifetime. It’s a very important project for Roman [Abramovich, the club’s owner].”

Lisa Nandy, a candidate for the Labour leadership, has pledged to implement any and all recommendations made in due course by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) in its full statutory investigation into the antisemitism in the Labour Party. The EHRC launched the investigation on 28th May 2019, following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Ms Nandy made the pledge to the BBC’s Andrew Neil in a television appearance.

She was also asked about tweets by Rachael Cousins, a prominent Labour activist who goes by “Rachael Swindon” on Twitter. Ms Cousins has reportedly accused the Board of Deputies of British Jews of being “Conservative backers” and called on it to “condemn all atrocities by the israeli military in the West Bank”. Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the State of Israel is an example of antisemitism under the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Ms Nandy labelled the comments “antisemitic” and called for Ms Cousins to be suspended by the Party and investigated.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse by parliamentary candidates.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Italy has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds this decision at a time of rising antisemitism in Europe.

The decision has been ratified by the Italian cabinet, which also appointed Prof. Milena Santerini as the national coordinator on combating antisemitism. Prof. Santerini serves as Professor of Pedagogy at the Catholic University in Milan, vice-president of the Shoah Memorial Foundation of Milan and a member of the National Didactic Council of the Shoah Museum in Rome and the Contemporary Jewish Documentation Center.

The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Italy joins a growing list of countries to use the Definition, including France, Greece, and Cyprus, which recently adopted it.

HM Treasury has today announced that it is designating the entirety of Hizballah as a terrorist organisation under the UK’s terrorism and terrorist financing rules.

Last year, following a gruelling effort over several years by Campaign Against Antisemitism and our allies, Hizballah was finally proscribed completely by the then-Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, with the support of the then-Foreign Secretary, Jeremy Hunt. Ensuring that the Government completely proscribes Hizballah has been an important objective for Campaign Against Antisemitism since our charity was established.

Previously, the British Government distinguished between Hizballah’s “military wing” and “political wing”, even though Hizballah mocked the Government and said that no such distinction exists. The loophole enabled brazen shows of support for Hizballah, including pro-Hizballah parades through central London which were organised by a registered charity, and fundraising and even recruitment for any supposedly non-military activities conducted by Hizballah were permitted in Britain. It was extremely likely that such funds were used to finance terrorist activity, and could even have been used to target British subjects.

We even launched a private prosecution against the leader of the parades who in 2017 claimed that “Zionists” had paid the Government to burn down tower blocks, days after the horrifying Grenfell Tower inferno, but our private prosecution was successfully taken over and shut down by the Crown Prosecution Service, despite the best efforts of our lawyers.

Now, with Mr Javid as Chancellor of the Exchequer, HM Treasury has today announced that the financing of any Hizballah activity will be proscribed under terrorist financing rules.

During our campaigning work against Hizballah, we gained the support of figures from the former commander of British forces in Afghanistan, a former Downing Street Chief of Staff to a prominent Muslim leader. Their voices were strengthened by calls from the Mayor of London and others, but the Government repeatedly proved unyielding.

Whilst the British Government has acted to end a long and shameful betrayal of British Jews, some have called for even greater leniency. Jeremy Corbyn, who famously called Hizballah his “friends”, even argued for the lifting of any restrictions on the group in the UK and spoke at numerous pro-Hizballah parades. One branch of the Labour Party even debated whether members of Hizballah should be allowed to join the Party.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are delighted that our ongoing efforts to ensure the full proscription of all antisemitic genocidal terrorist groups, including Hizballah, continue to bear fruit. Hizballah’s allies in the UK will now find it even harder to help finance the illegal operations of the group. We now call on the Government to keep up the momentum and ban the terrorist group Hamas in its entirety as well.”

There are calls for the chair of the governors of a school in Canning Town to be fired over an “inflammatory” poem.

Dante Micheaux became chair of the governors of the Eastlea Community School, which is run by Newham Council, in 2016.

One of his poems, titled “Siding with the Israelis” and published in 2010, has caused controversy.

Among the concerning lines are “I will become a conqueror of refugees exiled in their own home, an exploder of babies in bassinets, a barbed-wire fence dissecting families, so we can lie in the dust & watch snails race up Golgotha,” which appears to contest the right of Jews to self-determination and justifies terrorist violence against Jews. In another line, the narrator pledges to “piss on the pilgrims that have come to pray [in Jerusalem] – show you what a Zionist can be.”

Newham Council is reportedly investigating the matter.

A white supermacist sticker has been found at a bus stop in Sunderland just days after similar stickers were found and removed in Edinburgh.

The sticker was reported by a group called Sunderland Unites and removed by Sunderland Lads & Lasses Against Fascism. The sticker is thought to be connected to an online group known as the Hundred Handers that encourages users to print and distribute the stickers.

The Hundred Handers are also believed to be behind the Edinburgh stickers as well.

Campaign Against Antisemitism thanks the activists involved and calls on the authorities to investigate who is responsible. Residents are also urged to remain vigilant.

Photo credit: @SunderlandUnite/Twitter

The Labour Party has apparently withdrawn its complaint to Ofcom over the Panorama investigation into antisemitism in the Party, which Labour had claimed was a “one-sided authored polemic”. Ofcom has also dismissed all other bias complaints made over the programme.

In the episode, which was titled “Is Labour Antisemitic?” and televised in July, former Labour Party employees spoke out publicly to reveal Jeremy Corbyn’s personal meddling in disciplinary cases relating to antisemitism. The programme explained how senior Labour Party staffers, some of whom Campaign Against Antisemitism has known for years, used to run Labour’s disciplinary process independently, but soon after Mr Corbyn’s election as Party leader found themselves contending with his most senior aides, who were brazen in their efforts to subvert due process.

The Party submitted a 28-page complaint to the BBC, claiming that the programme failed to meet the BBC’s standards, but the BBC decided to back the makers of the episode and rejected the complaint. Labour was then able to make the complaint to Ofcom, which it did, but which it has now allegedly withdrawn.

Additionally, Ofcom has confirmed that it has dismissed all of the other bias complaints it has received over the programme. An Ofcom spokesperson said: “We assessed complaints from viewers who felt that this programme was factually inaccurate and biased. In our view, the programme was duly impartial. As well as highly critical personal testimonies, it included the Labour Party’s response prominently throughout, including in an interview with the Shadow Communities Secretary.”

The programme was shortlisted for two British Journalism Awards.

During the programme Labour’s press team made claims that the staffers featured had political axes to grind and lacked credibility, and it is understood that they and Mr Ware have now commenced libel proceedings against the Labour Party. The libel cases are being brought by Mark Lewis, a highly esteemed media lawyer who is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Pressure is building on the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) to come to a charging decision in the cases of the Labour activists arrested by police in connection with antisemitism in the Party.

The Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Cressida Dick, recently revealed that six arrests were made in connection with a secret dossier compiled by the Labour Party and subsequently leaked and referred to the Met by Campaign Against Antisemitism and the radio channel LBC, and that five of the cases were passed to the CPS in September 2019. Commissioner Dick explained that the cases represented a “complex crime type” and that the CPS would have to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to bring charges and a public interest in prosecuting.

Following Commissioner Dick’s revelation, a former Director of Public Prosecutions, Lord MacDonald QC, intervened in the matter to say that he believes not only that the CPS has had sufficient time to review the cases of the arrested Labour members and should announce its conclusions, but that the evidence suggests that crimes have indeed been committed.

Now, the Justice Secretary, Robert Buckland, has been asked on LBC for his position, replying: ”Obviously the CPS is the independent prosecutor. I am not going to comment about an individual case. But what I would say is the very fact we are talking about it on national radio, and the importance of this issue – antisemitism as you know is a serious issue not just because of itself but because it is a gateway to other types of prejudice in my view – I very much hope that everybody involved in the investigation will do it thoroughly. Obviously, it has to be looked at properly, but that it can be expedited.”

When asked about whether the CPS might be delaying in order to allow the issue to fade away, Mr Buckland said: “It [the time delay] can go on for as long as is deemed necessary. We’ve got to remember of course that if the case is what we call ‘summary only’ and can only be dealt with in the magistrates’ courts…there is a six month limit. Everyone needs to remember that. If it is going to the crown court, then there is no time limit.

“If everyone has that in mind as to the type of charge they might bring, then they should consider the matter carefully but obviously, like anything, delay is not the most desirable outcome. We need to get on with justice and deal with it as swiftly as possible.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Nominations for the position of leader of the Labour Party have closed, with five candidates securing sufficient support from fellow MPs to qualify for the race, which is expected to last three months.

The winner of the contest, who, as head of the largest opposition party, will also take the post of Leader of Her Majesty’s Most Loyal Opposition, will become the head of an institutionally antisemitic party that is being investigated by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), following a complaint by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has analysed the records of the five leadership hopefuls in order to inform the public, which can determine whether any of the candidates are fit to lead.

The deepest stain on the records of each of the candidates is the fact that they stood by the Labour Party during the years of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership despite its descent into racism. They were bystanders when several Jewish colleagues were hounded out of the Party, and they stood by too when principled colleagues made the difficult decision to leave the Party because they could not countenance campaigning for the antisemite Jeremy Corbyn to become Prime Minister, which all of the five candidates themselves did last month. Whether these candidates can ever reclaim any authority to speak out against antisemitism — or indeed any form of prejudice — is therefore doubtful.

The three candidates who served as senior figures in Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Cabinet and most actively campaigned to make him Prime Minister, in the face of polls that showed almost half of the Jewish community were considering leaving the country if they were successful in their campaign, are particularly unlikely ever to be able to provide a satisfactory justification for their collaboration.

Rebecca Long-Bailey

Rebecca Long-Bailey was one of those members of the Shadow Cabinet, serving as Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. She supported Mr Corbyn’s ideology and leadership — which she recently rated “ten out of ten” — throughout the past several years, to the point of being widely viewed today as the continuity candidate.

Despite representing a constituency — Salford and Eccles — with a Jewish population, Ms Long-Bailey reportedly showed little awareness of issues important to the community in her first few months in office.

This lack of awareness apparently spread to the media as well, as Ms Long-Bailey gave an interview to the controversial far-left website, The Canary, subsequently explaining that she was “not aware of concerns about The Canary at the time” of the interview. Lord Mann, the Government’s independent advisor on antisemitism, has announced that he will be investigating The Canary and other far-left websites in relation to the rise in antisemitism.

When it was revealed that Mr Corbyn had written a gushing foreword to a reissue of J.A. Hobson’s 1902 work, Imperialism: A Study, in which the author cast the blame for great wars on the Rothschilds and their control of the media — Mr Corbyn described the book as “correct and prescient” — Ms Long-Bailey defended him.

Ms Long-Bailey was also said to have opposed the adoption by the Labour Party of the International Definition of Antisemitism, opting instead to back the infamous “code” that was floated by Party insiders as an alternative to the Definition in order to dilute it.

She recently claimed that she spoke out on antisemitism in internal Labour meetings over the past few years and that if she were elected leader she would work “very hard and very robustly” to tackle antisemitism in the Party. She added that “I wasn’t happy with the way our process was being run.” Such comments echo those of her most prominent backer, Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell, whose persistent references to “process” during the election campaign represented an effort to deflect attention from the reality that the Party was home to legions of antisemites and an antisemitic leadership. In any event, Ms Long-Bailey’s claim to have spoken out on antisemitism behind the scenes has been disputed.

Given this record, it is unsurprising that Ms Long-Bailey has been endorsed by Pete Willsman, a pro-Corbyn member of Labour’s National Executive Committee who has been suspended from the Party twice. It is equally reasonable that she was accused, just a few days ago, by a fellow MP of being “partly responsible for the failure of Labour to stem the tide of antisemitism within its ranks.” The MP went on to say: “How she can now claim to be concerned about an issue that cost us the election — it’s staggering hypocrisy.”

Lisa Nandy

Lisa Nandy has consistently spoken out against anti-Jewish racism in the Labour Party and has acknowledged that a “particular sort of antisemitism has found its home on the far-left throughout history.” She added: “I have been a member of this party for twenty years, and what angers me most is the assertion that a person cannot be left wing and stand up to antisemitism — standing up to antisemitism is a core part of my values.”

Ms Nandy also criticised the handling of the revelations of historic antisemitic statements by Naz Shah in 2016 and opposed the readmission of the disgraced then-MP, Chris Williamson, in 2019, observing that “we have no right to pick and choose the type of racism we confront.” Although she sat in Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Cabinet in its first few months, she, along with numerous colleagues, quit, helping to prompt the 2016 leadership contest.

Ms Nandy participated in an event at the Labour Party conference in 2019 that featured Omar Barghouti (appearing via video link), who rejects Israel as a Jewish State and is a prominent figure in the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, the tactics of which an overwhelming majority of Jews find intimidating. However, Ms Nandy left the room before Mr Barghouti spoke.

Like her colleagues, Ms Nandy too is guilty of having stood by Labour even as it degenerated into an institutionally antisemitic party and campaigned for a government that would have been led by Jeremy Corbyn, despite the unprecedented fears of the Jewish community.

Jess Phillips

Jess Phillips, like Ms Nandy, has a far cleaner record than those candidates who served on Mr Corbyn’s front bench, albeit that she too campaigned to put Mr Corbyn into Downing Street notwithstanding that “Jewish people were afraid of us governing,” as she recently acknowledged.

It is notable that Ms Phillips raged in Parliament over the expulsion and deselection of Conservative MPs by their leader over Brexit, but when it came to the hounding of Jewish colleagues from her own Party — not over political differences but due to abject racism (combined, in several cases, with appalling misogyny) — she was not only less vocal but, like her peers, did nothing about it.

Ms Phillips is understood to have quit the Labour Party during the Blair years over the Iraq War, but chose not to do so in recent years when the Party became a cesspit of antisemitism, though she was only a student at the time and not a sitting MP. That being said, she recently revealed that she had been “quite tempted” to quit the Party over antisemitism, particularly after last year’s broadcast of the Panorama documentary into anti-Jewish hatred in the Party and the naked interference by Mr Corbyn’s office and allies in the disciplinary process. She said that it was after watching the programme that she “wobbled the most” in regard to her Labour membership. However, she apparently steadied herself with the solace that, given she “would have just been replaced by somebody who might not have spoken up” on the issue of antisemitism, it was better that she stayed. But Ms Phillips has yet to demonstrate what her speaking up actually achieved; it appears that she, like her colleagues, attained only the ignominy of having been an MP representing the first political party since the BNP to be investigated by the EHRC for racism.

Ms Phillips has vowed to “implement fully every single recommendation” made by the EHRC when it issues its report on the Labour Party.

Sir Keir Starmer

Sir Keir Starmer has served on Mr Corbyn’s frontbench in the influential position of Shadow Brexit Secretary and has been a vocal advocate of Labour under Mr Corbyn’s leadership. A former Director of Public Prosecutions, he has insisted, contrary to all the evidence, that Labour is not institutionally antisemitic (in an interview, incidentally, in which he conceded that denying Labour antisemitism was itself part of the problem). He has also claimed that Mr Corbyn is not particularly to blame for the antisemitism crisis that has engulfed their Party, but rather that there is collective responsibility, thus by his own admission implicating himself.

When Mr Corbyn’s defence of the antisemitic mural in East London came to light, Sir Keir declined to condemn the Labour leader, advising instead that Mr Corbyn “had given his explanation”. In case there was any doubt as to Sir Keir’s commitment to Mr Corbyn’s leadership of Labour and his effort to become Prime Minister, during the election campaign, Sir Keir reiterated that he was “100% behind Jeremy Corbyn”.

Having now lost the election and apparently recognising the political advantage of disassociating himself from Mr Corbyn’s leadership, Sir Keir has announced that “the handling of antisemitism [in Labour] has been completely unacceptable. It has caused deep distress for the Jewish community, which we must all accept responsibility for and apologise.” Sir Keir is hardly the first politician to offer cheap words; one suspects that there would have been little in the way of apology or responsibility had his ambitions to make Labour the party of government been realised.

Emily Thornberry

Emily Thornberry appears to have scraped through the nominations process thanks, not reassuringly, to the support of those who had previously backed the abortive candidacy of the pro-Corbyn MP, Clive Lewis. Ms Thornberry served as Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Foreign Secretary and was at the forefront of the campaign to make him Prime Minister and bring their institutionally antisemitic party into government.

Ms Thornberry has claimed that she has made interventions in shadow cabinet meetings and other forums on the issue of antisemitism — and she supported the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism by the Labour Party while some of her colleagues did not — but evidently she was never sufficiently moved to take more concrete and public action, such as resigning from the front bench or the Party.

She has also previously defended Mr Corbyn’s own record, insisting that “there isn’t a racist or antisemitic bone in Jeremy’s body”, ludicrously opining that the reason that he was failing to act on antisemitism was because he was so upset at being called an antisemite himself, and claiming that the Chief Rabbi was “wrong” to suggest that Mr Corbyn is an antisemite.

Although Ms Thornberry now describes tackling antisemitism in her Party as the “most urgent and immediate priority,” it apparently was not accorded such a lofty status when it was less politically convenient.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

The Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government has announced that he will be requiring all local councils to adopt the International Definition of Antisemitism “forthwith”.

Robert Jenrick made the comment in the House of Commons in an answer to the Conservative MP, Stephen Morgan, who asked about the Government’s plans to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the concentration camps. Mr Jenrick noted that although the camps were liberated, this did not bring an end to the “cancer of antisemitism”, and he announced that in addition to the policy on local councils, the Government was providing funding for Holocaust education and visits to Bergen Belsen.

Mr Jenrick also revealed that he plans to participate in the British delegation to Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust Museum, later this month to mark the occasion.

The announcement comes after it was reported that Mr Jenrick had written to all local authorities in the country urging adoption of the Definition.

Glyn Secker, who said that Jewish organisations are “in the gutter” and “part of the problem”, will reportedly be addressing a Holocaust Memorial Day event organised by the Socialist Workers Party.

Mr Secker, who is the Secretary of the the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour, is one of three speakers who will participate in the event, titled “Never Again: Lessons of the Holocaust”, scheduled to take place on 27th January in East London. The event has been put together by the Tower Hamlets branch of the controversial organisation, Stand Up to Racism, which is linked to the Socialist Workers Party.

Although the event is intended to “remember the victims of the Holocaust and to commit ourselves to fight racism today,” Mr Secker has spent the last several years campaigning in support for the antisemitic leader of the institutionally antisemitic Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn.

Mr Secker also has a history of controversial remarks about Jews, including holding American rabbis responsible for fuelling the neo-Nazis behind recent antisemitic terrorism in the United States, including the fatal terrorist attack on a synagogue in Poway, California. Mr Secker claimed that they were “unleashing the extreme-right to win key votes in marginal states which determine the presidency”. He has also called Labour MPs who are “friends of Israel” a “fifth column in the Labour Party.”

“What on earth are Jews doing in the gutter with these rats?” Mr Secker has asked, after claiming that the “Zionist Federation embraces the [far-right] English Defence League”, which is a fabrication. He has also claimed: “Here’s a warning to the [British] Jewish leadership, while you foment your campaign of allegations of antisemitism against Corbyn and the left to silence Israel’s critics, while you cry wolf month after month, year after year in the Labour Party and remain blind to the explosion of the far-right and Islamophobia, you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem…You serve to protect the poison that would destroy both our freedom and yours. Well brothers and sisters, we are on the side of the Palestinians. We are on the side of the freedom marchers of ghetto Gaza.”

Mr Secker has also defended Ken Livingstone’s conspiratorial remarks about Adolf Hitler’s supposed support for Zionism, and told Labour activists at a Dulwich and West Norwood branch meeting in February 2019 that claims of antisemitism in the Party had been “made up in order to discredit the leadership.”

Mr Secker, who has reportedly admitted to having previously been a member of the Socialist Workers Party, was briefly suspended from the Labour Party, but it was revealed last March that Mr Corbyn’s key aide, Andrew Murray, intervened in the case, reportedly writing an e-mail saying that Mr Corbyn was “interested in this one”. Mr Secker’s suspension was lifted.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Stickers bearing the message “Antisemitism is caused by Semitism” have been plastered around the Royal Mile in Edinburgh.

The phrase is commonly used by neo-Nazis and white nationalists online, and it is understood that the stickers were appended by a group calling itself the Hundred Handers.

Stickers were seen and removed by appalled locals on Jeffrey Street, St Mary’s Street, Jury’s Inn and La Garrigue, and one concerned resident warned others to take care in their removal in case razor blades or sharp objects had been hidden behind,

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “The implication of this phrase is that Jews cause antisemitism. The accusation that antisemitism is the result of Jews’ own behaviour is a slur that has been used to persecute Jews for centuries, culminating in the Holocaust.

“This is offensive not just to Jews but all residents in Edinburgh and thousands of tourists. It is a terrible image for Edinburgh as the Royal Mile is such a popular and iconic tourist attraction. We expect that the authorities to remove the stickers immediately and investigate who is responsible.”

A spokesman for the local council advised that street cleaners have been alerted.

Lord Mann, the Government’s independent advisor on antisemitism, has praised the innate decency of the British people after they rejected “the extremism of antisemitism” in the general election.

He observed that the “true face of this country and the true story of the election is this: in Derby North, Christopher Williamson [the disgraced former Labour MP] got 635 votes and lost his deposit,” while “in West Bromwich East, George Galloway got 489 votes and lost his deposit. This is the innate decency of the British people yet again. Across the entirety of the country, people are saying, very vocally and unequivocally, ‘We reject the extremism of antisemitism.’”

The former Labour MP for Bassetlaw who resigned last year in protest at the Party’s institutional antisemitism and the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, made the remarks in his debut speech in the House of Lords.

On his new advisory role, Lord Mann said: “I am rightly independent and, as ever, I shall work cross-party, but I will be no bystander in driving out the stench of intolerance from the party that in 1906 my family helped to create in the city of Leeds, in the streets around Holbeck Moor.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

A Labour MP has described the Party’s antisemitism scandal as a “terrible stain” and admitted that it made her “feel compromised in staying at times”.

Bridget Phillipson, the MP for Houghton and Sunderland South, disclosed to the The House magazine that “it was very difficult and it’s a source of immense regret to me that people like Luciana [Berger] were effectively forced out of the Labour Party.”

However, she believed that “I needed along with many other people to be a part of making the change,” and indeed that “massive change” in the Party is needed.

Her comments come as incidents of Jew-baiting in the Party continue.

Labour International, a group comprising the Party’s overseas members, has published a report titled “General Election Part Two: Why didn’t we win?”, which revealed that “Many of us believe that the row about antisemitism has been stoked by the government of Israel and its helpers in the UK.” The report was drafted by the secretary of the 3,500-strong group, and it claimed that Israel sought to “prevent the election of a Labour government that will recognise a Palestinian state.” It also added that officials from leading Jewish organisations who met with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in 2018 “had links to the Conservative Party.”

A co-chair of Labour International was involved in a Facebook group reportedly set up in order to assist Party members subject to internal disciplinary investigations, including over antisemitism, and he has previously claimed that “Antisemitism accusations are a sideshow, a convenient weapon being used on behalf of the Right in British society to derail Corbyn and his supporters.”

Meanwhile, a rally in support of Labour leadership hopeful Rebecca Long-Bailey saw a member of the Unite union  accuse the candidate of “cuddling up to…the Chief Rabbi, a well-known Tory.” In the audience were Gordon Nardell QC, a failed election candidate who previously served as Labour’s first general counsel, brought in to oversee its disciplinary procedures on antisemitism, a post which he left after a year; and Claudia Webb, who has defended Ken Livingstone and and was the Chair of the Labour Party’s Disciplinary Panel. RIchard Burgon, the pro-Corbyn MP who is running for the deputy leadership of the Party, had not yet arrived to the meeting.

The comment was greeted with applause from the audience, although two attendees stood up and called the speaker an antisemite, while the chair instructed an official to have his microphone removed.

Elsewhere, in Ilford South, a motion was reportedly carried declaring that there was “no antisemitism in the Labour Party” and attacking the Board of Deputies of British Jews as a “Tory organisation” that was “illegally interfering in the Labour leadership contest.” Activists who spoke against the motion were apparently labelled “agents of a foreign power”. Attacks on the Board of Deputies have gained steam on Twitter as well.

Campaign Against Antisemitism predicted that Labour’s election defeat would elicit anti-Jewish scapegoating by Party activists and has urged the Jewish community to remain vigilant.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

A woman entered a “Miss Hitler” beauty pageant described as a “publicity stunt” to attract new members to the neo-Nazi terrorist group National Action, a jury has heard. 

Alice Cutter, who is 23 years old, used the name “Buchenwald Princess” to enter the online ‘National Action Miss Hitler 2016’ contest, described as “sick”, in June 2016, weeks after her partner, Mark Jones, visited the execution room of the Buchenwald concentration camp. Jurors have been shown a picture of Mr Jones and another man posing at the Buchenwald camp holding a National Action flag.

Ms Cutter and Mr Jones are both on trial at Birmingham Crown Court, along with two other men, Garry Jack and Connor Scothern.

All stand accused of being members of a “fellowship of hate” comprising some 50 or 60 hardcore activist members of National Action. The group, according to the prosecution, has “a common admiration for Hitler and the architects of the Holocaust.”

Labour leadership contender, Jess Phillips, has reportedly suspended her constituency office manager and key aide, Salma Hamid, for posting offensive tweets, including one accusing Israel of “inflicting Holocaust conditions on Palestinians.”

Problematic tweets have been uncovered which Ms Hamid reportedly posted 2014 and 2016, before she joined Ms Phillips’ office. In one exchange, Ms Hamid wrote: “We must show the world that ‘Israel’ is the murderer!” She also claimed that: “Israel IS inflicting Holocaust conditions on Palestinians! Oppressive, racist and violent!”

In another message, Ms Hamid appeared to equate Israel with the Islamic State: “Because Israel obeys human rights/law? Hilarious! Isis are terrible too. So really there is no difference.”

According to the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government, “Drawing comparisons of contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis” is antisemtic.

In a statement released on Twitter, Ms Phillips, who is the MP for Birmingham Yardley, said: “Yesterday evening I was shown some completely unacceptable messages posted by a member of my team prior to her employment with me. I have been clear from the outset that we need a zero tolerance approach to antisemitism in the party – and so the person involved was suspended with immediate effect.”

She added: “This is the right thing to do and the only way to start building a bridge again with the Jewish community. I’m unable to comment further now that a disciplinary process is underway.”

It has also emerged that St Paul’s Community Development Trust, a charity based in Balsall Heath of which Ms Hamid was chair of the board of trustees, has also suspended her following the revelations. Ms Hamid was appointed to the role in October of last year. The charity stated that it “aims to create a culture that respects and values people’s differences, that promotes dignity, equality and diversity and that encourages individuals to develop and maximise their true potential.”

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Warwick University has reportedly refused to adopt the widely accepted International Definition of Antisemitism because it does not offer “any added value.”

In a letter, the university’s Vice-Chancellor, Professor Stuart Croft, told the university’s Jewish Israeli Society (JSoc) president, Angus Taylor, and Jewish Chaplain, Rabbi Fishel Cohen, that the university would not “formally adopt individual definitions of specific forms of discriminatory behaviour.”

Prof. Croft explained that “to adopt one would inevitably lead to the adoption of a whole series of such definitions.” The university, however, would be “mindful” of the Definition.

In response to the letter, Mr Taylor said: “We are deeply disappointed with this decision and call on the university to reverse it without delay.” He called the decision a “shameful abdication of its responsibilities towards Jewish students.”

Mr Taylor added that: “Instead of heeding the Government’s advice and adopting the internationally-recognised Definition, they have instead invented their own pseudo-definition with no consultation from Jewish students at Warwick.”

A university spokesperson said that the Vice-Chancellor has offered to “continue the dialogue” in person with students and the Jewish Chaplain.

In December, the University of Bristol adopted the Definition, after a controversial debate. University College London has also adopted the Definition, following a call on universities to adopt the Definition by the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, Robert Jenrick.

Antisemitism at universities has long been a major focus for Campaign Against Antisemitism, however this year we will elevate it to one of our three major national strategic priorities. This will include working with university administrations to persuade them to formally adopt the Definition.

Chelsea Football Club has reportedly commissioned a British-Israeli artist to create a large mural to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

The twelve metres by seven metres work of art will incorporate three footballers who were sent to Auschwitz during the War, namely Julius Hirsh, the first Jewish player to represent Germany and who played for the national side seven times between 1911 and 1913 and was sent to the extermination camp in 1943; Arpad Weisz, the Jewish Hungarian football player and manager who was murdered at Auschwitz in 1944; and Ron Jones, a British prisoner of war who came to be known as the “Goalkepper of Auschwitz” after playing in the Auschwitz Football League. Mr Jones was liberated by the Americans and returned to Wales where he lived until his death in 2019.

The mural project is part of Chelsea’s Say ‘No to Antisemitism’ campaign, backed and funded by the team’s owner, Roman Abramovich.

The artist, Solomon Souza, moved to Israel from the UK as a teenager and is known for spray-painted murals in Israel. His grandmother escaped the Nazis from Prague in 1939 and came to the UK.

The mural will be unveiled at Chelsea’s Stamford Bridge stadium on 15th January, in advance of Holocaust Memorial Day on 27th January.

Spotify has removed user-generated playlists which, while not necessarily carrying any offensive music, have antisemitic and pro-Nazi names.

In the past, Spotify has rightly been praised for removing hateful content, such as neo-Nazi music, from its streaming platform, but following an analysis by The Times of Israel of antisemitic user-generated playlists, Spotify has removed these as well.

Playlists have also been given titles by users such as “Lord of Jews”, accompanied by a picture of Adolf Hitler, and “The Fourth Reich” alongside a Nazi insignia. Other include: “Gas the Jews music”; “Gas Jews”; “Kill the Jews”; “The Holocaust was a joke”; “Rocking the soccks [sic] off holocaust victims”; “Just found out the Holocaust was fake”; “Hitler was right”; “Songs to snort Anne Frank’s ashes”; “Getting gassed with Anne Frank”; “Gas Anne Frank”; and “Auschwitz Train Sing Along”. One playlist, called “Auschwitz mixtape”, is accompanied by the phrase: “Almost as lit as the Jews in 1943”. Other playlist titles allude to antisemitic conspiracy theories, such as “9/11 did the jews”; and “RoThsChiLd Chillz”.

The playlist titles are searchable and available across the platform for its over 200 million global subscribers.

Users on Spotify can also register themselves under any name, and over 110 publicly viewable profiles are also registered under the name “Adolf Hitler”, with dozens more using variations of that name.

In a first statement to The Times of Israel, Spotify said: “We take this topic very seriously. Content (artists and music) listed by the Federal Department for Media Harmful to Young Persons (BPjM) in Germany is proactively removed from our service. We’re a global company, so we use the BPjM index as a global standard for these issues. Other potentially hateful or objectionable content that is flagged by users or others but not on the BPjM list is handled on a case-by-case basis.”

However, Spotify then reportedly advised that it would in fact remove the hateful content. A spokesman for the music platform said: “The user-generated content in question violates our policy and is in the process of being removed. Spotify prohibits any user content that is offensive, abusive, defamatory, pornographic, threatening, or obscene.”

A sixteen-year-old neo-Nazi teenager from Durham has been jailed for six years and eight months by Manchester Crown Court after being found guilty of preparation of terrorist acts between October 2017 and March 2019.

The teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is the youngest person ever to be convicted in the UK for planning a terrorist attack.

Reportedly a follower of far-right ideology since the age of thirteen, the boy had hoped to follow in Adolf Hitler’s footsteps and listed numerous targets “worth attacking” with Molotov cocktails, including synagogues, which were listed under “Areas to Attack” in his manifesto, which was titled “A Manual for practical and sensible guerrilla warfare against the kike system in the Durham City area, Sieg Heil”. Other items seized from his home included a copy of Mein Kampf and material on explosives and firearms.

During the trial, the prosecution claimed that the defendant had become “an adherent of neo-Nazism – the most extreme of right-wing ideology”, noting that he had written in his diary on the occasion of Hitler’s birthday that the Nazi leader was “a brave man to say the least. Although maybe having written proof that I admire their number one enemy isn’t such a wise idea. I will however say that I one day hope to follow in his footsteps.”

The jury did not believe the teenager’s claims that his far-right musings were for “shock value” only, and he was found guilty of preparation of terrorist acts, disseminating a terrorist publication, possessing an article for a purpose connected with terrorism, and three counts of possessing a document or record containing information likely to be useful to a terrorist.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

The local Labour branch in Liverpool Wavertree, which has been accused of bullying its former Jewish MP, Luciana Berger, is to debate affiliating to Jewish Voice for Labour.

The motion to be debated reads: “Wavertree CLP [Constituency Labour Party] agrees to affiliate to the socialist and anti-racist organisation Jewish Voice For Labour at the earliest opportunity.” It is understood that there will not be a vote at the conclusion of the debate this evening.

Jewish Voice for Labour is a pro-Corbyn antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation within the Labour Party.

Luciana Berger was the target of a sustained campaign of antisemitic harassment and bullying that eventually led her to quit the Labour Party in February 2019 after her local constituency party proposed a motion of no-confidence in her.

It is understood that the constituency Labour party leader, Dr Scott-Samuel, who is reportedly Jewish, appeared on The Richie Allen Show on the radio, on which he promoted a Rothschild conspiracy theory, saying: “The Rothschild family are behind a lot of the neo-liberal influence in the UK and the US”

The Richie Allen Show has featured antisemites such as Alison Chabloz and Gilad Atzmon, conspiracy theorist Kevin Barrett, who believes Israel was behind 9/11, and Holocaust deniers including Nicholas Kollerstrom. The host has himself apparently questioned the number of Jews that were murdered in the Holocaust, telling Mr Kollerstrom that “there’s a big lie there somewhere, I don’t believe the numbers are anywhere near as great as they’re saying, you know…I’m with you with respect to the numbers and the way that it’s been exploited ever since.” Mr Allen is considered to be a protege of David Icke.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Lord MacDonald QC, the former Director of Public Prosecutions, has revealed that he believes not only that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has had sufficient time to review the cases of the arrested Labour members and should announce its conclusions, but that the evidence suggests that crimes have indeed been committed.

Lord MacDonald, who headed the CPS from 2003 to 2008, made the intervention after the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Cressida Dick, revealed that six arrests were made in connection with a secret dossier compiled by the Labour Party and subsequently leaked and referred to the Met by Campaign Against Antisemitism and the radio channel LBC, and that five of the cases were passed to the CPS in September 2019.

Commissioner Dick explained that the cases represented a “complex crime type” and that the CPS would have to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to bring charges and a public interest in prosecuting.

But Lord MacDonald opined that “these are allegations about the conduct of members of a major political party and so there is obviously a strong public interest in this being resolved, and resolved as quickly as possible.” Moreover, he noted that a long delay fuels “rumours” and “unease” and therefore that “safe conclusions are needed sooner rather than later.”

Lord MacDonald went on to say that “the sensitivity in these cases is that prosecutors have to balance two things: one is the suggestion that these messages, these posts may comprise incitement to racial hatred, or other hate crimes, on the one hand, and then on the other hand, free expression rights,” adding that this “can sometimes be a tricky analysis but I should have thought that three months is plenty of time to come to conclusions in this case.”

He observed that “there is some very extreme material here. There are posts suggesting that a named Jewish Labour politician should be given a ‘good kicking’,” as well as “posts suggesting that Jews should be exterminated. There’s talk about gas chambers, although it is said we shouldn’t use gas chambers in the UK because we need our own gas for our own purposes.”

He concluded: “This is very extreme stuff, which I’d have thought is well capable of comprising a criminal offence. Speech has to be pretty extreme to amount to incitement to racial or religious hatred but some of this speech does look to be very extreme indeed.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism has taken a close interest in these cases since it referred them to the Met live on air in September 2018. Lord MacDonald is right that the CPS has had sufficient time to reach safe conclusions. There must be zero tolerance of antisemitism not only on our streets but also in political parties.
On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

It has been revealed that a former Labour councillor and parliamentary candidate has published numerous social media comments accusing Jewish Labour MP Margaret Hodge of trading on the Holocaust and suggesting former deputy leader Tom Watson and principled Labour defector Ian Austin were in the pay of Israel’s Likud Party.

Bob Pandy, who is still a member of Kensington’s Constituency Labour Party, was Labour’s parliamentary candidate for the seat in 1979. In other posts he also referred to Labour’s antisemitism crisis as a “smear”, worried that leadership hopeful Rebecca Long Bailey might be a “Zionist”, and suggested that Mr Austin might engage in bestiality.

Mr Austin was one of a number of Labour MPs in the previous parliament who resigned from the Labour Party in disgust towards its institutional antisemitism. He is also an honorary patron of Campaign Against Antisemitism.

The revelations were made by a fellow Labour and union activist.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Labour Party candidates for Parliament in the 2019 general election accounted for 82 percent of all incidents of antisemitic discourse.

A woman screamed “f*** Jews you are all the same” at a Jewish man yesterday.

The incident took place on Thorpe Road in Stamford Hill, and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD6490 07/01/2020.

The incident comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism reported on an epidemic of antisemitic crime in Stamford Hill over the Chanukah period.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

The former MP for Redcar has revealed that working-class voters in her constituency were outraged by Labour’s antisemitism crisis, even though the area has no Jewish community.

Anna Turley, Labour’s former MP who was defeated in her bid for reelection in the North Yorkshire constituency, disclosed that “[Jeremy] Corbyn was an issue on almost every single door,” and that antisemitism, along with Brexit and concerns about Mr Corbyn’s views on national security, were to blame for her defeat.

Mr Turley observed that her constituency is “an area where we don’t have an ethnic minority population in any way. It’s not an area where people had any Jewish connections. I think there’s only one person who identified as Jewish from the last census, as I understand. But what they said was, ‘My parents or my grandparents – they fought the war over this.’”

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism showed that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which was equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders in the 2019 general election. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament accounted for 82 percent of all incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

It has emerged that the Labour frontbencher and leadership hopeful Rebecca Long Bailey addressed an event in Manchester just months after her election as an MP in 2015 in which she showed “very little awareness” of issues important to the Jewish community, dismissed claims that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is an antisemite and promised to join Labour Friends of Israel but never made good on that pledge.

The JC has reported that Ms Long Bailey made the remarks and pledge at a meeting co-hosted by Manchester’s Zionist Central Council and the Jewish Representative Council in a bid to calm fears among the local community about Mr Corbyn.

Ms Long Bailey was asked for her opinion on the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign, which engages in tactics which an overwhelming majority of British Jews consider to be intimidatory according to Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antsemitism Barometer 2019. It is understood that the audience was disappointed that Ms Long Bailey appeared to be entirely unfamiliar with the boycott campaign, but was reassured by her comments that she “was opposed to such boycotts.”

She was also asked why she had joined Labour Friends of Palestine but not also Labour Friends of Israel. She replied that her first days at Parliament were rather like “freshers’ week” and it seemed like a popular organisation to join, but she accepted that there were two sides to that conflict a gave a “firm promise” to join Labour Friends of Israel. However, it is understood that Ms Long Bailey has not joined the organisation nor did she make any move to do so in the months following the event.

On 28th May 2019, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

The Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police has disclosed that six arrests have been made over antisemitism in the Labour Party in connection with a dossier referred to the Met by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Cressida Dick, the UK’s most senior police officer, told LBC this morning that six arrests were made in early 2019 and five files were passed to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in September 2019. These developments were further to the 45 cases mentioned in a secret Labour dossier referred to the Commissioner by the chief executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, Gideon Falter, live on LBC in September 2018.

The cases in the dossier included an activist who attacked a Jewish Labour MP as a “Zionist Extremist” who “hates civilised people” and was “about to get a good kicking” for spreading “Zionists propaganda”; an activist who posted an article containing Holocaust denial and antisemitic cartoons of Jews from a blog claiming to provide “intelligent antisemitism for the thinking gentile”; a Labour Party member posting that “we shall rid the Jews who are a cancer on us all” and that “these Jewish f***ers are the devils”; and a Party member accused of physically and verbally abusing a seven-year-old boy using racist epitaphs including “Paki” and “Jew-boy”.

Commissioner Dick explained that these cases represent a “very complex crime type” and therefore it was difficult to anticipate when the CPS would make a decision on whether to charge the individuals, based on whether there is sufficient evidence and if charging the offenders would be in the public interest.

Host Nick Ferrari also asked the Commissioner if she was concerned about a resurgence of antisemitic crime in London and nationally, to which she responded that “we have seen more” and that “it is really pernicious”.

The Commissioner also made reference to the antisemitic graffiti daubed on a synagogue and numerous commercial establishments in Hampstead last month, describing it as a “horrible event” and noting that it came “hard on the heels of the terrible attacks in the United States”, alluding to the violent intrusion into a rabbi’s house in Monsey, NY during a Chanukah celebration. She acknowledged that the graffiti has “shaken people in the local area and wider community” and insisted that the police have a zero tolerance approach to antisemitic crime. Commissioner Dick said that the police were “taking that investigation extremely seriously” and that “it is progressing well”.

Commissiner Dick’s interview can be watched below.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

UPDATE: The CPS has commented: “We’ve received a file of evidence from (the Met) in relation to antisemitic hate crimes. We are reviewing this material to consider further charging decisions.”

Tom Pope, the Port Vale forward, has apologised for a tweet he sent several hours after scoring in his club’s FA Cup third round defeat to Manchester City.

Responding to a request to predict the course of a hypothetical Third World War, Mr Pope tweeted: “We invade Iran then Cuba then North Korea then the Rothchilds [sic] are crowned champions of every bank on the planet – the end.” The tweet has since been deleted.

After being warned by other Twitter users that his tweet could be construed as racist, he said: “I mentioned them owning the banks which is fact and now I’m facing all this,” adding: “How is it racist?? Seriously is someone out to destroy me or what?”

It is understood that the FA has considered launching an investigation, as is Mr Pope’s Port Vale club.

However, Port Vale has now published a statement from Mr Pope that states: “Following the reaction to my response on Twitter about the Rothschilds, I was unaware of any link between the Rothchild (sic) family and the Jewish community. If I have caused offence to anyone, I’d like to apologise enormously as this was never my intention.”

A Jewish family has alleged that they were subjected to anti-Jewish racial abuse by a flight attendant on American Airlines.

The family were boarding flight AA142 at New York City’s JFK Airport en route to Heathrow yesterday, and whilst stowing their bags were accosted by a female crew member who allegedly shouted: “you f***ing Jews think you control the plane”.

The incident was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol, and is being investigated by authorities at Heathrow.

American Airlines tweeted in response that “our company culture celebrates diversity on all levels. It’s part of who we are,” inviting the victim to contact the company directly.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has contacted the airline for further comment.

If you have any more information, please contact Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD1954 7/1/2020.

After 3,200 people attended the #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism rally in Parliament Square on 8th December 2019 to protest antisemitic crime and antisemitism in public life in the UK, now thousands have rallied in the United States and in France to speak out against the rising tide of antisemitic crime in their countries.

On 6th January in the United States, ten thousand people, including the Governor of New York, marched across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City to protest a series of anti-Jewish hate crimes in New York and New Jersey, including the shooting in Jersey City and the attack at a rabbi’s home in Monsey during a Chanukah party. The march was under the banner: “No Hate, No Fear”.

Meanwhile, on the same day, thousands of French Jews and their supporters rallied in Paris to protest the decision by the French Court of Appeal that the murderer of Sarah Halimi was “not criminally responsible” for his actions. Ms Halimi was brutally beaten in 2017 and thrown out of the window of her apartment in a building she shared with the murderer. Ms Halimi was routinely insulted in their building, the murderer conceded that seeing a Jewish menorah and prayer book in the 65-year-old lady’s flat intensified his mental state and even the court acknowledged that the attack was antisemitic.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has always been clear that there must be zero tolerance for antisemitic crime and perpetrators must be subject to the full force of the law.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

Cardinal Nichols has denounced the antisemitic graffiti daubed on numerous commercial establishments and a synagogue in Hampstead in late December 2019, saying that “the recent antisemitic graffiti in north London brings shame to us all” and condemning “all expressions of hatred”.

The Cardinal, who serves as Archbishop of Westminster and President of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales, made the remarks in his New Year’s message, in which he hoped that “each of us, every person in our society, will shun all forms and expressions of hatred against others”.

“Such hatred,” he said, “can have no place in our way of life. Only when we see the good in each other will every person feel welcomed and unafraid.”

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said of the incident: “The perpetrator must be identified and prosecuted to clearly show that the intimidation of Jewish communities will not be tolerated.”

A spate of antisemitic incidents have taken place in Stamford Hill over the past fortnight during the Chanukah period, marring celebrations.

On 21st December a Jewish man walking back from a synagogue down Fairholt Road on the corner of Bethune Road was pelted with a glass bottle by an assailant shouting “dirty Jew” (CAD7178 21/12/19).

On 22nd December a white male pedestrian spat at the car of a Jewish motorists shouting “f***ing Jew”. It was then discovered that two other Jewish drivers, waiting at a traffic light, were abused by the same offender. The incident took place on Manor Road (CAD1907 22/12/19).

On 26th December, a man walked into a kosher butcher’s shop in Stamford Hill shouting antisemitic abuse and pointing his fingers at Jews in a gun gesture (CAD4725 /26/12/19).

On 1st January 2020, a Jewish lady tried to enter a lift with her children at Stratford Overground Station on their way home to Stamford Hill and politely asked a Muslim couple to make some space for them, only to have them shout “you Jewish people, you think you own the world, you stink” (British Transport Police ref 378 01/01/2020).

On 4th January, a Jewish man was punched in the face in an unprovoked attack by two men. The incident took place at 22:35 on Craven Park Road (CAD7256 4/1/2020).

On 5th January, two men were reported to have threatened Jewish worshippers at a synagogue on Heathland Road in Stamford Hill shortly after 01:00 (CAD562 05/01/2020).

Later in the morning of 5th January, a Jewish woman was approached on Durlston Road by a man brandishing a large knife and shouting “f***ing Jew”. Volunteers from Stamford Hill Shomrim followed the assailant until he was arrested by police (CAD3239 05/01/2020).

Also on 5th January, in the latest violent attack on a Jewish minor, a 13-year-old boy travelling on a bus was punched in the stomach as the male assailant shouted “you stupid Jews think you own the world” and “you f***ing Jews” (CAD4968 05/01/2020).

On 6th January, a Jewish mother was subjected to antisemitic abuse while waiting with her baby outside their home on Lordship Road for a taxi to hospital. The male assailant screamed, “f***ing Jewish c***” (CAD6471 06/01/2020).

All of these incidents were reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information about any of these incidents, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting the relevant reference number.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are seeing violent attacks being perpetrated with increasing frequency on the observant Jewish community in Stamford Hill. Police, politicians and above all prosecutors must now urgently take on board the reality that the epidemic of anti-Jewish hate crime on the streets of London can only be stemmed through rapid and zero-tolerance enforcement of the law. Failure to act urgently may result in the atrocities that have been committed on the other side of the Atlantic being replicated here in the UK.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

In the latest violent attack on a Jewish minor, a 13-year-old boy was punched in the stomach as the male assailant shouted “you stupid Jews think you own the world” and “you f***ing Jews”.

The attack took place on a bus heading towards Stamford Hill at 11:46am on 5th January and was reported by Stamford Hill Shomrim, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Police are said to be investigating.

If you have any more information, please contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD4968 05/01/2020.

Stephen Silverman, Director of Investigations and Enforcement at Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “We are seeing more and more violent attacks against Jewish minors on public transport. Perpetrators must be caught and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

In a first for Britain, social media executives will be held responsible for antisemitism and racism on their platforms, according to The Times. New regulations due to be published this month will legislate to tighten regulatory control of abuse on social media, under the auspices of Ofcom, the communications watchdog. The rules will come into effect after the UK leaves the European Union, which is scheduled to happen on 31st January. 

Under the new system, the Government expects to hold British senior management personally responsible for abuse, with each social media giant required to have at least one British-based director responsible for UK operations under a “statutory duty of care”. Technology firms are likely to be asked to provide the funding to ensure regulation is properly managed and penalties that social media companies may face are said to be “proportionate”.

However the report claims that stronger measures including calling on service providers to block websites or apps from being used in the UK have been dropped.

This follows a consultation launched under Theresa May’s government last summer into various proposals to regulate social media. This policy has in turn been adopted by Boris Johnson’s government which pledged to “legislate to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online — protecting children from online abuse and harms, protecting the most vulnerable from accessing harmful content, and ensuring there is no safe space for terrorists to hide online.” Codes of practice will be drawn up by Ofcom.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has long called for tougher regulations on social media sites and that social networks proactively search for and remove hate speech from their platforms. It is reassuring to hear that social media sites will be held responsible for cleaning up their own sites. It is vital that Ofcom ensures that complex hate crime on social media is properly identified and understood, and that antisemitism is carefully monitored.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has provided antisemitism training to Ofcom’s executives.

Sol Wielkopolski, a Conservative Party Councillor on Cumbria County Council, has caught himself out a second time over antisemitism.

Cllr Wielkopolski reportedly tweeted a complaint that when he began a search with the letters “Ju”, Google suggested searching for “Judaism just another cult” followed by “Junkers 88”. The Junkers 88 was a Nazi-era military aircraft that flew for the Luftwaffe. In reality these were not Google’s suggestions, but searches from Cllr Wielkopolski’s own search history.

Cllr Wielkopolski’s tweet is now ‘protected’ and can only be seen by his confirmed followers.

In a previous blunder, Cllr Wielkopolski tweeted on 5th August 2019: “Why is Corbyn inciting hatred of the wealthy? I guess it’s consistent with his hatred of Jews. The wealthy pay far more tax and create more jobs than his tribe, so should be celebrated and cherished, not derided. Wealth should be a protected characteristic.” By doing so, Cllr Wielkopolski repeated a deeply-entrenched antisemitic stereotype and myth about Jews and money. The negative stereotype that Jews are wealthy is one of the oldest antisemitic conspiracy theories.

On the previous occasion, Cllr Wielkopolski deployed an antisemitic trope in a blundering attempt to defend Jews. His search history adds further concerns.

Last weekend, while Jews in America were hit by yet another violent attack, South Hampstead Synagogue and businesses around Hampstead were daubed with graffiti commonly used by conspiracy theorists to suggest that Jews were secretly behind the 9/11 terrorist atrocities. This has led to outpourings of solidarity and support for the Jewish community, many of which have been admirable and sincere signs of support from across the country, however, some condemnation and support has come from unwelcome sources.

One of those sources is an organisation called Stand up to Racism, which organised a “vigil” against the graffiti.

Stand up to Racism has consistently failed to stand with the Jewish community when the community was faced with antisemitism from the far-left and has regularly platformed Jeremy Corbyn. Stand up to Racism was joined in organising the “vigil” by Unite Against Fascism, which supported the so-called “Al Quds Day” in the past, a pro-Hizballah march which has platformed antisemites including Reverend Stephen Sizer, who has claimed that an Israeli conspiracy was behind 9/11, and in February 2015 was ordered by the Church of England to stop using social media. While Revd Sizer protested that he was not problematic, the Church said the material that Rev Dr Sizer posted was “clearly antisemitic.”

The vigil appears to have had no speakers from the synagogues in the area targeted in these incidents. Amongst those attending, however, were members of the sham Jewish representative group Jewish Voice for Labour. Jewish community attendees and journalist Lee Harpin reported being harassed and ridiculed as a “Zionist journalist” by the organisers and activists weaponising these incidents to score political points and signal their own virtuousness.

Additional messages of support for the Jewish community have come in via Twitter from those who aided and abetted the Labour Party’s campaign to place an antisemite in office, often ignoring or downplaying accusations of antisemitism. This includes Sir Keir Starmer and Dawn Butler, who would have served in an institutionally antisemitic cabinet had the Labour Party won the election, Owen Jones, and Ash Sarkar of Novara Media, who defended the activist who vandalised of the walls of the Warsaw Ghetto and claimed that the International Definition of Antisemitism is merely a front to silence criticism of Israel. 

Most insulting of all was Jeremy Corbyn, who has himself been guilty of numerous counts of antisemitism. Over the past several years, the Jewish community has watched the descent of the Labour Party into abject racism with horror. Mr Corbyn is an antisemite and under his leadership, Labour has become institutionally antisemitic, defending antisemites and victimising those who stood up to them, cultivating animosity towards Jews at all levels and hounding out of the Party Jewish MPs and the most decent of their colleagues.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “For those who have done so much to mainstream antisemitism in the UK to cry crocodile tears on behalf of a Jewish community they have shown disdain for, when they suspect that the perpetrators hail from their political opposites, shows that to them antisemitism is something they are only willing to play lip service to when it is politically convenient. They are not welcome and our community deserves better than cheap virtue signals.”

Anybody with information about the graffiti should call the police on 101, quoting reference CAD 7282/28/12/19.

South Hampstead Synagogue and businesses around Hampstead have been daubed with graffiti commonly used by conspiracy theorists to suggest that the Jews were secretly behind the 9/11 terrorist atrocities.

The businesses targeted included wine merchant Oddbins, menswear shop Ésclot, former Israeli-style restaurant Café Hampstead, and even a telephone box.

According to South Hampstead Synagogue, at least twelve locations in addition to the synagogue were targeted. Police are investigating and Camden Council is working to remove the graffiti.

“Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective” is antisemitic, according to the International Definition of Antisemitism.

A spokesperson for Campaign Against Antisemitism said: “Last night there were over a dozen brazen acts of racially or religiously motivated criminal damage. The perpetrator must be identified and prosecuted to clearly show that the intimidation of Jewish communities will not be tolerated.”

In a statement, Inspector Kev Hailes of the Metropolitan Police Service, said: “This is clearly a concerning incident and one we are taking seriously. We have liaised with our partners in order to remove the graffiti and various enquiries are underway to find who is responsible. Officers will be on patrol throughout the area in order to provide some reassurance to local communities. Please approach us if you have any questions or concerns. I ask anyone who might have seen anything suspicious last night to call us and aid the investigation.”

Anybody with information should call the police on 101, quoting reference CAD 7282/28/12/19.

Police and Stamford Hill Shomrim are looking for a man who walked into a kosher butcher’s shop in Stamford Hill, shouting antisemitic abuse and pointing his fingers at Jews in a gun gesture.

The incident took place just after 16:00 today when the man walked into Royal Meats demanding food. When asked what he would like to buy, witnesses say he began swearing, apparently expecting to be given food free of charge. He is alleged to have shouted: “You f***ing Jews, I am German, you f***ing Jews are bad people”, before pointing his fingers at people in the shop in a gun gesture.

The suspect is described as a white male, approximately 40 years of age, with a tall, medium build. He was wearing green trousers, a black coat, a black ‘beanie’ hat and a black rucksack. He was seen boarding a number 76 bus at around 16:15.

Anybody with information should call the police on 101, citing reference number CAD 4725/26/12/19, or call Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123.

Cyprus has adopted the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Campaign Against Antisemitism applauds this decision at a time of rising antisemitism in Europe.

The proposal to adopt the International Definition was presented by the Foreign and Education Ministers and was approved by cabinet. A Foreign Ministry statement said: “It reaffirms the commitment of the Republic of Cyprus to promoting and fostering respect and diversity and to combating all forms of discrimination, racism and xenophobia, including antisemitism.” 

The UK was the first country in the world to adopt the International Definition, something for which Campaign Against Antisemitism, Lord Eric Pickles and others worked hard over many meetings with officials at Downing Street. Cyprus joins a growing list of countries to use the International Definition, including France, which recently adopted it.

Football pundit and former footballer, Perry Groves, reportedly described a player as having “a Holocaust of a game” on a live radio show.

The comment was made during TalkSPORT’s Warm Up show at 11:00 on Sunday. Mr Groves, who formerly played for Arsenal, was discussing Sheffield United’s win over Brighton on Saturday with co-host Max Rushden.

Mr Groves referred to goalkeeper Mat Ryan’s performance in the match, when he said the player “had a Holocaust of a game.”

Condemnation from outraged listeners was swift. The Holocaust was the planned, brutal genocide of Jews and others in Europe and many British Jews are the descendants of Holocaust survivors or those who escaped to Britain, so it is unsurprising that many people were upset by Mr Groves’ distasteful Holocaust reference.

Shortly after the comment, Mr Groves apologised live on air: “I’d just like to sincerely apologise for my misuse of words earlier. I didn’t mean to offend anybody and if I have offended anybody I’m truly, genuinely sorry and that is from my heart.”

This is not the first time a Holocaust reference has been made on TalkSPORT. In February last year, former Hull City manager Phil Brown issued a heartfelt apology to Campaign Against Antisemitism for also making a “Holocaust of a game” comment.

The Conservative Party is reportedly investigating Councillor Mohammad Aslam over posts he allegedly shared on Facebook, including a claim that Jewish Labour MP, Ruth Smeeth, who lost her seat in the recent election, was “funded by [the] Israel lobby.”

Under the International Definition of Antisemitism adopted by the British Government, “Making mendacious, dehumanising, demonising, or stereotypical allegations about Jews as such or the power of Jews as collective — such as, especially but not exclusively, the myth about a world Jewish conspiracy or of Jews controlling the media, economy, government or other societal institutions” is antisemitic.

Cllr Aslam, who represents the Bradley ward on Pendle Borough Council in Lancashire and was a Labour councillor before he defected to the Conservative Party in 2015, reportedly shared a number of other problematic posts on Facebook.

One allegedly said the: “Gaza massacre is the price of a ‘Jewish state.’” He also showed the image of a bloodied child and a description of the Israeli government’s actions as: “Radical Jewish Terrorism.” The post added: “Israel is an illegal state. Israel is a Terrorist State.” In another post, he allegedly shared a video which read: “Jerusalem, we are coming.”

Under the Definition, “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination (e.g. by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavour)” is antisemitic.

A spokesperson for the Conservative Party told the JC: “This matter is under investigation. Our complaints process is rightly a confidential one but there are a wide range of sanctions to challenge and change behaviour, including conditions to undertake training, periods of suspension and expulsion, and these are applied on a case-by-case basis.”

Earlier this month, the Lancashire Telegraph reported on a private message allegedly sent from Cllr Aslam’s account, in which he said: “Everyone says you have a mind of Jews.”

According to the Definition, antisemitism “employs sinister stereotypes and negative character traits.”

A spokesperson for Cllr Aslam told the Lancashire Telegraph that he did not recall sending the message and claimed that his account has been hacked previously. “He is in no way antisemitic or racist. This was a private message on Facebook Messenger. Cllr Aslam does not recall sending it. His Facebook has been hacked in the past. If he did send it, it would appear to have been taken out of context and Cllr Aslam would need to see the full conversation to comment further.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism expects the Conservative Party to conduct a fair, efficient and transparent disciplinary investigation, and to insist that any claims of social media hacking are backed up by ample evidence.

A Jewish man walking back from synagogue was allegedly pelted with a glass bottle by an assailant shouting “dirty Jew” in Stamford Hill.

The alleged assault occurred at 19:45 on Saturday, as the Jewish man was walking from a synagogue down Fairholt Road on the corner of Bethune Road in Stamford Hill, North East London. As he walked, a man allegedly shouted at him: “Dirty Jew, f****n Jew, all Jews shall go to hell.” He then threw a glass beer bottle at him and it smashed on the ground.

The suspect is described as a tall white male with a medium build who was wearing blue jeans, a brown coat, a red baseball cap, a blue hoodie and red trainers.

Anybody with information should call the police on 101, quoting reference number CAD 7178 21/12/19, or call Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123.

In a separate incident on Saturday evening, a Jewish motorist was stationary in his vehicle on Manor Road in Stamford Hill, when a male suspect allegedly spat at the car and subjected him to a torrent of verbal abuse, including “f***ing Jew.” Anybody with information should call the police, quoting reference number CAD 1907 22/12/19, or call Stamford Hill Shomrim.

In yet another incident, two Jewish motorists were also verbally abused in the area while waiting at traffic lights.

The contrast could not be starker in the Chanukah messages from Britain’s political leaders.

Countering antisemitism was central in Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s video message. He said: “Today as Britain’s Jews seek to drive back the darkness of resurgent antisemitism, you have every decent person in this country fighting by your side. Britain would not be Britain without its Jewish community.”

Referencing recent fears within the Jewish community over antisemitism, he added: “And we will stand with you and celebrate with you at Chanukah, and all year round.”

However, the antisemitic Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, failed to even mention Labour’s antisemitism scandal. In a video message lasting over two minutes, Mr Corbyn completely ignored the antisemitism crisis in the Labour Party. He said: “It seems to be the right time to be thinking about the message of hope” but clearly not the right time to be thinking about antisemitism in his Party and its effect on the British Jewish community.

Instead, he attempted to explain to British Jews what Chanukah is and then descended into a political message. He said of lighting the Chanukah candles: “They have been lit in the worst of times” and cited some of the atrocities that befell the Jewish people. In echoes of his Rosh Hashanah message, Mr Corbyn seemed to equate the theme of the festival with the environment. On three occasions he talked about the climate crisis or emergency. He then attacked the Conservative Party and said: “Our communities now face the threat of years of policies that won’t heal divisions or end equality.”

Ed Davey, acting co-Leader of the Liberal Democrats, also focused on antisemitism in his video message, saying: “Regrettably, we still need to fight that antisemitism and religious persecution here in the UK and across the globe. British Jews are an integral part of our national identity.”

Nicola Sturgeon, Leader of the Scottish National Party, posted a short message on Twitter, noting: “Chanukah is a special time of year for Jewish communities to come together and celebrate their faith. I wish all of you celebrating in Scotland and across the world a peaceful and happy Chanukah — Chanukah sameach!”

The Green Party or its leaders have not sent a Chanukah message, and nor has the Brexit Party.

Afzal Khan has been confronted at a Chanukah party over his historic antisemitic social media posts.

Gideon Falter, the chief executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, asked the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton why he had shared a post in 2015, when he was an MEP, that referred to “mass murdering Rothschilds israeli Mafia Criminal Liars” several years ago, and how he had “the gall to show [his] face” at the event, which was being held at the London residence of the US ambassador on 19th December.

The post also said: “Divorce Israel-British-Swiss Rothschilds Crime Syndicate in every way especially homeland security and AIPAC-Wall Street-Pentagon warmongers!” and “Netanyahu = major sales person for Iraq War = puppet of the Zionist mafia like Bush & Clintons!”

Mr Falter reported that he “went up to him and he put his hand out, and I said ‘I don’t shake hands with Jew-haters’. And I asked him what he was doing there.” Mr Khan responded that he had been invited. Mr Falter replied that “Chanukah is the celebration of the triumph of my people over antisemites like you,” asking: “Do you often attend celebrations for people you despise?” Mr Falter further asked: “You shared an article saying that there is a conspiratorial Israeli Rothschild mafia. Lord Rothschild is here. Are you not afraid to be in the presence of such a man?”

Although Mr Kahn said he was “sincerely sorry about this genuine accident” when the post was revealed earlier this year, Mr Falter said that Mr Kahn now denied that he had shared anything antisemitic. Mr Falter showed him a screenshot of the post in question on his mobile phone, as well as a tweet from Mr Khan in 2014 linking to an article with the title: “The Israeli Government are [sic] acting like Nazi’s [sic] in Gaza”.

Mr Falter told Mr Kahn: “You’re not just an antisemite, you’re a brazen liar too.”

Mr Kahn responded that he was going to speak to somebody else, but Mr Falter warned him: “Everywhere you go in this room, I will accompany you so that everyone you try to shake hands with or speak to knows who and what you are, or you can just get out now.” Mr Khan then said goodbye to the ambassador and left.

A spokesman for Mr Kahn erroneously claimed that Mr Falter had “sworn at” Mr Khan and repeated that he had apologised for the offensive social media material.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

The Government has confirmed that it will honour its manifesto pledge to ban local councils and public bodies from, in the Prime Minister’s words, “taking it upon themselves to boycott goods from other countries to develop their own pseudo-foreign policy against a country which with nauseating frequency turns out to be Israel.”

The Prime Minister made the remarks in the debate over the Queen’s speech in the House of Commons.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that 76% of British Jews felt intimidated by tactics used to boycott Israel. This figure is consistent with findings over the past several years.

An op-ed in The Independent contends that accusations of antisemitism are levelled to stifle criticism of Israel while also complaining about “the trouble with Jews today”.

The brazen article, written by Slavoj Zizek, a Slovenian philosopher, and published earlier this month, adopts the “Livingstone Formulation”, the formula named after Ken Livingstone that claims that accusations of antisemitism are used to silence criticism of Israel.

The article on the one hand claimed that “today, the charge of antisemitism is addressed at anyone who critiques Israeli policy,” while also insisting on the other hand that “the trouble with Jews today is that they are now trying to get roots in a place which was for thousands of years inhabited by other people.”

Aside from the dubious history intended to minimise if not erase the historical and religious connection of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel, which goes back thousands of years, Mr Zizek is “Holding Jews collectively responsible for actions of the state of Israel,” in breach of the International Definition of Antisemitism. In case this was not obvious, The Independent, recognising that the statement was antisemitic, subsequently amended it to read: “the trouble with the settlement project today is that it is now trying to get roots in a place which was for thousands of years inhabited by other people” (emphasis added).

Of course the irony of the piece — which exemplifies the sinister folly of the Livingstone Formulation — is that Mr Zizek’s “criticism of Israel” was in this instance antisemitic, thereby undermining his entire thesis. Editors at The Independent utterly failed to recognise this, but perhaps they should be credited for correcting the article, not merely for belatedly removing the offending phrase, but also for conceding that Mr Zizek’s choice of words was appalling.

There is a common misconception — sometimes deliberately promoted — that the Definition stifles criticism of Israel. But the Definition is unequivocal: “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism published a legal opinion from expert counsel on this point, which can be read here. It states: “The Definition is a clear, meaningful and workable definition. The Definition is an important development in terms of identifying and preventing antisemitism, in particular in its modern and non-traditional forms, which often reach beyond simple expressions of hatred for Jews and instead refer to Jewish people and Jewish associations in highly derogatory, veiled terms (e.g. ‘Zio’ or ‘Rothschilds’). Public bodies in the United Kingdom are not ‘at risk’ in using this Definition. Indeed, this Definition should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate. Criticism of Israel, even in robust terms, cannot be regarded as antisemitic per se and such criticism is not captured by the Definition. However, criticisms of Israel in terms which are channels of expression for hatred towards Jewish people (such as by particular invocations of the Holocaust or Nazism) will in all likelihood be antisemitic.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism calls on The Independent to issue an apology for initially publishing an antisemitic article and to allow us to write a countering article that debunks Mr Zizek’s bunkum.

A representative poll of the British population conducted prior to the general election showed that 39% of respondents believe that Jeremy Corbyn is an antisemite and that 47% believe that the Labour Party has an antisemitism problem.

The poll of 12,147 was commissioned from Deltapoll by a Jewish charity and conducted between 29th November and 2nd December 2019. The general election took place on 12th December.

The poll provides insight into how the British population understood and reacted to the accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party. An overwhelming majority of the population had seen a lot or at least a little media coverage of antisemitism in recent months, with less than one fifth saying that they had not seen any coverage or were unsure if they had.

Almost a quarter of respondents believed that Mr Corbyn and the Labour Party are antisemitic, with an additional 15% believing that only Mr Corbyn is antisemitic, and 8% believing the Party is but its leader is not. Just over a fifth said that neither is antisemitic. However, almost half (47%) thought that Labour has a problem with antisemitism, with just over a quarter respectively thinking that it did not (26%) or did not know (27%). A clear majority of 59% considered that Mr Corbyn had been incompetent in handling accusations of antisemitism in the Labour Party. Almost half of respondents (46%) believed a different leader of the Party would have handled the antisemitism crisis better.

One tenth of respondents believed that Mr Corbyn is hostile towards Jews, one quarter believed that he has poor judgment as a politician and 23% believed that he does not have prime ministerial qualities. Conversely, 8% said that he was not given a fair chance and 15% believed that the media is hostile towards him. If Mr Corbyn had handled the accusations of antisemitism in Labour better, 28% said that that would have made them more likely to vote Labour, while over half (55%) said that it would not.

Of those respondents who were considering voting Labour and believed that the Party has an antisemitism problem, 34% said that it made them less likely to vote Labour, 29% were prioritising other issues and 15% believed that it was more important to have a Labour government. Only 8% of those likely to vote Labour believed that the antisemitism problem was minor and being handled well.

For those respondents who had voted Labour in 2017 but were, at the time of the poll, uncertain about how they would vote, 16% cited antisemitism as the reason.

As to how the accusations of antisemitism in Labour made them feel, almost a quarter (24%) of respondents said that they were angry that Labour had a leader who could not deal with it properly and 13% said that they felt let down by Labour. As to the media’s role, 16% said that they were “annoyed with the media for over-hyping the story” and 15% said that they were “annoyed with the media for making too much of it”. 16% were also “annoyed with the Conservatives for using it for political reasons”, while 2% even said that the accusations of antisemitism made them “suspicious of Jews”.

A fifth said that they were worried about increasing racism in society and almost a third (31%) said that it made them embarrassed at the state of British politics. Only 15% said that the accusations of antisemitism in Labour had not really impacted them.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Dyfed-Powys Police in Wales have given a formal caution to the owner of Tribestan UK for sending antisemitic e-mails to a Jewish man after Campaign Against Antisemitism intervened in the case.

Daniel Davies sent e-mails to an Israeli man who attempted to order items from his company, saying: “Unfortunately Jews have negativity on our businesses. Do you know why? Because Jews rip us off! Jews f*** us up!” A second e-mail sent a short while later stated: “We don’t ship to Israel because the Jews rob us! Sorry but that’s a fact. They scam the world.”

In an e-mail to the victim, the police have now reported that Mr Davies was interviewed under caution in the presence of his solicitor, admitted to sending the abusive e-mails, claimed that he was under the influence of alcohol when he did so and that he sent an apologetic email the next day when sober, and has now been issued with a formal police caution that will remain on his police record.

We are unsurprised to learn that Mr Davies has had to retract his claim that “our e-mail got hacked via wifi over a business phone”, which is a common excuse offered by companies and individuals whose antisemitic messages have been publicly exposed.

Regrettably, the police originally claimed that Mr Davies’s emails were simply “stating an opinion” and refused to log it as a hate crime. They then closed the case, having accepted Mr Davies’ original defence at face value. It was only following a series of interventions by Campaign Against Antisemitism that the police upheld our complaint, reopened the case and recorded the incident as a hate crime under the Malicious Communications Act. They formally apologised saying that they “completely share the concerns you raised.”

Stephen Silverman, CAA’s Director of Investigations and Enforcement said: “Daniel Davies meted out vile racist abuse to a Jewish customer. He tried to lie his way out of facing the consequences of his actions and the initial investigating officer tried to dismiss the case against him. Now the investigating officer has been overruled as a result of our intervention and Mr Davies has a criminal record. Mr Davies is just the latest person to find out the hard way that we are unrelenting in bringing antisemites to justice.”

Two teenagers have been charged over an antisemitic assault on a visiting senior rabbi, when he was beaten bloody by the assailants who shouted “kill the Jews”.

The two individuals, aged fourteen and fifteen, were also said to have shouted “f*** Jews” and “dirty Jew” during the antisemitic attack, which took place at approximately 21:45 on Friday 1st November as the rabbi walked along Amhurst Park in Stamford Hill.

The suspects reportedly handed themselves in on Tuesday, after being recognised by a relative from the images that police previously released.

The incident took place during the Jewish Sabbath, when orthodox Jews do not use telephones, and was reported to the police and Stamford Hill Shomrim, a volunteer Jewish neighbourhood watch patrol, which said that the victim, 54, was left “collapsed on the pavement, bleeding and dazed, where he lay for several minutes.”

The suspects are due to appear at Stratford Youth Court on 7th January.

Tottenham Hotspur, the North London-based football club, has published the results of its consultation with fans on their use of the word “Yid” at football games.

The consultation was launched in August and the Club received more than 23,000 responses. According to the survey, 33 percent of respondents use the word “Yid”, which is a Yiddish word for “Jew”, regularly in a football context. Of those who do not use the word regularly, eighteen percent said that they find the term “offensive”, with that number rising to 35 percent among Jewish respondents.

Nevertheless, the use of the word among Jewish fans was quite evenly divided, with 36 percent of Jewish respondents regularly chanting the word, 30 percent “occasionally” chanting it and and 34 percent never chanting it. One respondent said: “I am Jewish and find the regular use of the Y-word offensive. I don’t believe most Spurs fans understand its connotations and history.”

94 percent acknowledge that the word can be considered a racist term against a Jewish person, and only twelve percent would use it outside of a footballing context. One fan said: “While the intention of Spurs fans is good, and supportive of Jews, it is still a word that could cause offence,” while another wrote: “I like the tribal way that the term is changed but being a black man, I would like to know whether the Jewish community is offended by its use at our matches before I’d even consider using it.”

Almost half of the respondents would prefer to see supporters chant the word less or not at all.

The Club maintains that the word was historically adopted by fans as a defence mechanism in order to “own” the term and deflect antisemitic abuse in the 1970s that was directed toward fans of the Club, which has long been associated with the Jewish community. Nevertheless, older fans who might be more likely to have witnessed that development appear to be the least likely to use the word, as chanting it is progressively more popular among fans in falling age groups. However, younger fans, among whom chanting the word is popular, believed that the use of the word nowadays does still deflect antisemitism.

Conversely, 30 percent of respondents felt that the use of the word played a role in attracting abuse from rival fans, with the number rising to 37 percent among Jewish respondents.

The Club suggested that it “appear[s] that the history and the motivations behind why fans adopted the term in the first place are being lost over time, with many fans today using it solely as a means to identify themselves as a Spurs supporter,” with one fan writing: “Until my very late teens I had no idea it had historic roots to the Jewish community or that it had been considered a racist slur. It simply meant Spurs to me.”

When respondents were asked whether they would like to see less use of the word at football matches, almost half answered that they would like to see fans choose to chant it less or stop using it altogether.

The club concluded: “all of the above underlines just how complex the nature of this issue is and these varying viewpoints are illustrated in the written responses that we received from respondents too.” As one fan wrote: “I’m Jewish and I understand how offensive the word is yet I do accept that it is used in a very positive frame of reference by fellow Spurs fans. We need an alternative but I don’t know what that is, I can’t see Spurs fans shouting ‘you’re Spurs, you’re Spurs’ at a new player as a replacement for ‘Yiddo, Yiddo’ but we need to find a way to change it. I know this doesn’t give you answers, just my very confused view on how we solve an almost impossible situation. I do also think it’s the responsibility of other clubs to stop the racist chants being directed at us as well.”

Looking to the future, the Club insisted that it takes “a zero tolerance approach….towards real antisemitic abuse” and that “we pride ourselves on being an inclusive and forward-thinking Club and these findings indicate the awareness our fans have of current sensitivities and a willingness to reconsider the appropriateness of the continued use of this term.” It said it shall be organising focus groups, giving supporters the chance to meet and exchange views with fellow fans.

Those invited to contribute to the consultation included all Executive Members, Season Ticket holders, One Hotspur + Members and match-attending One Hotspur Members, as well as those affiliated to Supporters Clubs (both domestic and international), and a sample of non-matchday attenders from both among One Hotspur Members and non-Members. Of the 23,000 responses, 95 percent were either a Season Ticket holder, an Executive Level or One Hotspur Member. Eleven percent of respondents stated that they were Jewish.

An actor from the hit television series, The Office, shared a social media post claiming that “some rich Jews play the ‘antisemitism’ card to protect themselves”.

Ewen Macintosh, who played Keith Bishop in the programme, shared a statement on Facebook discussing Labour’s election defeat with a Jewish comedian.

The post said that “our hypersensitivity leads us to see any criticism of Jews as ‘antisemitism’”, and since “in modern Britain there are many Jews who are rich” and that “being rich, their position is threatened (as they see it) by the ‘Marxist’ ideas of the Labour Party” and “indeed many left-wing members of the Labour Party will identity ‘The Rich’ as their enemies,” consequently “some rich Jews play the ‘antisemitism’ card to protect themselves. Personally I find this inexcusable.”

Mr Macintosh initially said of the statement that “this was written by one of the wisest Jewish men I know”, but when challenged reportedly clarified that the statement was authored by the actor Colin David Reese and that he did not endorse it but “merely posted it as an example of a different viewpoint [to that of his interlocutor]” and “it’s hopefully still possible to quote sources in this day and age without being accused of agreeing with them. Otherwise we are in serious trouble.”

A man who shared footage of himself training a dog to perform a Nazi salute has had his application to appeal rejected by the Supreme Court.

Mark Meechan, also known by the alias Count Dankula, had been found guilty by Airdrie Sheriff Court of breaching the Communications Act by publishing material that was racist, grossly offensive and antisemitic in nature at a trial in April 2018, after he uploaded a video of his girlfriend’s dog lifting its paw when he said “Sieg Heil” and reacting to the phrase, “Gas the Jews”. He was ordered to pay £800.

He reportedly refused to pay the fine but the money was seized from his bank account by the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service.

Mr Meechan took his case to the Supreme Court after several appeals in Scottish courts had failed, but his application to appeal on human rights grounds was rejected on the basis that it was “incompetent” and “without merit”. Mr Meechan had funded his legal case by crowdfunding almost £200,000.

Although he has reportedly noted that the European Court of Human Rights might be the final option remaining, he indicated that he may redirect the money raised to charity instead.

The disgraced former Labour MP, Chris Williamson, described his erstwhile Party’s institutional antisemitism as “manufactured” and part of an “assault on our democracy” by a “hostile foreign government” to “normalise Zionism in the Labour Party”.

Mr Williamson made the comments in a video explaining the outcome of his legal case regarding his three suspensions from the Labour Party. In the video, he said: “We’ve seen manufactured antisemitism allegations as part of a concerted smear campaign. A hostile foreign government has mobilised its assets in the UK, which Israeli diplomats call their ‘power-multiplier’ in an attempt to prevent a Corbyn-led Labour government. Their secondary goal was always to blunt the internationalism in our movement and normalise Zionism in the Labour Party. They’ve done this by terrifying activists, coordinating with anti-Corbyn journalists and MPs and using faith organisations, many of them charities, to promote the antisemitism narrative…Instead of fighting interference in our election and calling out this outrageous assault on our democracy, the Labour Party’s internalised the narrative promoted by the far-right Israeli government.”

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that 17% of British people believe, like Mr Williamson, that Israel and those who support it do damage to British democracy.

Mr Williamson resigned from the Labour Party after learning that he would not be allowed to stand for the Party in the general election. His extraordinary letter of resignation from the Party read like a manifesto against Jews. He ran in the general election as an independent and, in a rarity for an incumbent MP that demonstrates the depth of his rejection by his Derby North constituents, got so few votes that he lost his deposit.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, with Mr Williamson responsible for 26 incidents.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Fifty Jewish professors and students at the University of Cambridge have written an article protesting the political Left’s belittling of antisemitism and dismissal of their concerns.

The endorsers of the article include Prof. Simon Sebag Montefiore, Prof. David Abulafia and Daniel Janner QC.

The intervention was prompted by a campaign event featuring the (successful) Labour candidate, Daniel Zeichner, who, they claim, was dismissive of antisemitism concerns raised with him. One student reportedly asked Mr Zeichner for his view on what Labour should do to resolve its antisemitism crisis, to which the candidate responded that Labour is merely a “voluntary organisation” like a “football club” or a “church”, and asked: “what else do you want us to do?”

The authors of the article accused the MP of “Labour-splaining” antisemitism to Jewish students and observed that his response was “emblematic of a wider disease that has taken hold of both the Labour Party and left-wing spaces here at Cambridge.”

They lamented that when antisemitism is raised, Labour activists and supporters feel personally attacked and respond by pointing out fault in other parties or questioning Jews’ motives.

They also note that the “disturbing choice” between speaking out against antisemitism on the Left versus suffering in silence has “taken a profound toll on Jewish students at Cambridge”, including impacting mental health. There is a “social cost of speaking out,” they say.

The article questions why students who wear Jewish skullcaps have had their pigeon-holes stuffed with Labour leaflets while others lay empty, why Labour activists aggressively approach Jewish students, why blatantly antisemitic tropes are excused as mere criticism of Israel, and why they are told that their experiences of antisemitism do not matter.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

A group of teenagers threw a bag of faeces onto the doorstep of a Jewish home in Stamford Hill.

The incident occurred on Springfield Road on 12th December and was reported by Shomrim Stamford Hill, the Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

Anyone with further information should contact the police on 101 or Stamford Hill Shomrim on 0300 999 0123, quoting reference number: CAD1458 12/12/19.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

Staffers in the Labour Party are said to be planning industrial action against the Party over “institutional racism and mismanagement.”

The staffers are reportedly aggravated by aides to Jeremy Corbyn retaining their posts into the new year, which the staffers blasted as “not only embarrassing but also disgraceful”.

Staffers are apparently preparing a motion to be put to a GMB branch meeting in January. The GMB is one of two unions that represent Labour Party staff.

The organisers of the motion say that if the aides are still in post in January, they will seek industrial action on two grounds, namely “institutional racism and mismanagement of the organisation that [is] costing hardworking staff their jobs.”

They added: “Over the last four years we’ve seen a culture develop of bullying, and intimidation and hatred, where staff have openly contemplated ending their own lives due to the cover up of institutional racism.” They continued: “The fact that people who oversaw this culture and also devised the strategy that delivered the worst election defeat in 85 years have ended up hanging onto their jobs is not only embarrassing but also disgraceful. Any self-respecting trade unionist will support that staff in the Labour Party have to stand up and make their voices heard.”

Last year, a BBC Panorama investigation revealed repeated interventions by the Labour Party leader’s office in disciplinary matters, and the pressures brought to bear on staffers, some of whom disclosed resulting mental health problems.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

A woman shouted, “what are you doing? Is that because you are Jewish?” at a Jewish mother parking by a school in order to collect her children.

The incident occurred yesterday in Golders Green, and the assailant, who was a passenger in a nearby passing vehicle, was described as a white woman with a large build. Her light brown hair was tied back in a ponytail and she was wearing a light-coloured woolly jumper. The driver of the vehicle was reportedly a white woman with straight black hair.

The passenger was in a car with the registration number PN15FWP.

The incident was reported by Shomrim North West London, a Jewish volunteer neighbourhood watch patrol.

If you have any more information, please contact Shomrim North West London on 0300 999 1234.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

The head of the Hebrew and Jewish Studies Department at University College London has used a Chanukah message to attack the university’s adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism.

Prof. Sacha Stern, who is Jewish, explained that his and others’ public opposition to the adoption of the international definition is that it “will stifle the expression of such legitimate political views.” He also claims that the Community Security Trust (CST) and the Board of Deputies “have adopted, very sensibly, a politically neutral definition of antisemitism that makes no reference to Zionism or Israel.

Prof. Stern is wrong on both points. First, the international definition does not stifle free speech, only hate speech. In July 2017, Campaign Against Antisemitism published the opinion of expert counsel, David Wolfson QC and Jeremy Brier, on the adoption of the International Definition of Antisemitism. The opinion states that: “Public bodies in the United Kingdom [such as universities] are not ‘at risk’ in using this Definition. Indeed, this Definition should be used by public bodies on the basis that it will ensure that the identification of antisemitism is clear, fair and accurate. Criticism of Israel, even in robust terms, cannot be regarded as antisemitic per se and such criticism is not captured by the Definition. However, criticisms of Israel in terms which are channels of expression for hatred towards Jewish people (such as by particular invocations of the Holocaust or Nazism) will in all likelihood be antisemitic.” The definition itself states that “criticism of Israel similar to that levelled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic.”

Second, the CST does in fact use the international definition in its reportage and the Board of Deputies has expressly called for the wide adoption of the international definition in its recent election manifesto.

It is absurd for Prof. Stern to claim that the international definition poses a risk to anyone but those intending to express antisemitic views and contribute to the toxic atmosphere for Jewish students that now prevails on many campuses, as Prof. Stern himself concedes. It is particularly reprehensible that Prof. Stern would use his Chanukah message to attack the adoption of a tool on which so many Jewish students and professionals rely in combating the resurgence of the world’s oldest hatred. Prof. Stern should apologise.

Campaign Against Antisemitism is currently raising a litigation fund, a major focus of which will be to challenge universities through legal action. Please consider contributing.

The controversial filmmaker, Ken Loach, has suggested that Jeremy Corbyn was subjected to a “torrent of abuse” and that regardless of what he did, the “campaign” of antisemitism accusations was “going to run and run”.

Mr Loach made the remarks in an interview on the BBC in the wake of Labour’s election defeat. Asked how he feels about the election result, Mr Loach said that he feels “anger that Jeremy has had a torrent of abuse — every Labour leader is abused but not to this extent. He’s a man of peace who’s been called a ‘terrorist’. He’s…been arrested against racism and been called a ‘racist’. And these things are lies.”

He added that Mr Corbyn faced a torrent abuse that was “off the scale”, and that, regarding antisemitism, “there was a campaign that was going to run and run”. He conceded that “there will be antisemitism in the Labour Party, as there is in other parties and across society,” but said he would defer to the Jews in the Labour Party who say that antisemitism was being “weaponised”, with particular reference to the antisemitism-denial group and sham Jewish representative organisation, Jewish Voice for Labour.

Mr Loach has a history of inflammatory comments on the subject of antisemitism. He described the BBC’s Panorama investigation into Labour antisemitism as “disgusting because it raised the horror of racism against Jews in the most atrocious propagandistic way, with crude journalism…and it bought the propaganda from people who were intent on destroying Corbyn.” he was also reportedly behind a motion passed by Bath Labour Party branding the Panorama programme a “dishonest hatchet job with potentially undemocratic consequences” and asserting that it “disgraced the name of Panorama and exposed the bias endemic within the BBC.” John Ware, the programme’s reporter, is apparently considering legal action against Mr Loach for his comments.

Mr Loach’s voice has been among the loudest of those who attempt to dismiss Labour’s antisemitism crisis as non-existent and a right-wing smear campaign.

In 2017, Mr Loach caused outrage when, during an interview with the BBC, he refused to denounce Holocaust denial. The International Definition of Antisemitism states that “denying the fact, scope, mechanisms (e.g. gas chambers) or intentionality of the genocide of the Jewish people at the hands of National Socialist Germany and its supporters and accomplices during World War II (the Holocaust)” is a manifestation of antisemitism. Although Mr Loach later sought to clarify his remarks, he has continued to make inflammatory and provocative statements about Labour’s antisemitism scandal. While speaking at a meeting of the Kingswood Constituency Labour Party, Mr Loach advocated the removal from the Party of those Labour MPs, some of whom are Jewish, who have taken a principled stand against antisemitism. Shortly after that incident, the Labour Party announced that it would no longer use Mr Loach as a producer of their election broadcasts.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which is equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament account for 82 percent of all incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

A man has been arrested in connection with an incident in which a Jewish man was punched and teenage girls was subjected to antisemitic abuse on the number 254 bus.

The incident occurred on 6th December while the bus was near Stamford Hill, travelling towards Hackney. The man was reportedly reading a prayer book when the suspect allegedly subjected him to antisemitic abuse, before turning his attention to a group of teenage girls. When the first victim intervened, the suspect punched him in the arm.

Police were called to the scene but could not locate the suspect. However, using CCTV, the police have now identified and arrested a 48-year-old man on suspicion of a racially aggravated public order offence.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s analysis of Home Office statistics shows that an average of over three hate crimes are directed at Jews every single day in England and Wales, with Jews almost four times more likely to be targets of hate crime than any other faith group.

Two successful Conservative election candidates have separately disclosed that they faced antisemitic abuse during their general election campaigns.

Tom Tugenhat, the returned MP for Tonbridge and Malling in Kent and a prominent Tory backbencher, has said that he suffered “very un-Tonbridge” antisemitism during his campaign, lamenting that it had not been “as clean as previous campaigns”. With reference to online abuse, Mr Tugenhat said: “For the first time I faced antisemitism in this campaign, which I found particularly offensive and very surprising in a community like this and frankly rather distasteful. It was very un-Tonbridge, very un-Kent and very un-British.”

Meanwhile, across the country in High Peak in Derbyshire, newly elected MP Robert Largan has revealed that he encountered anti-Jewish sentiment on the campaign trail. In one instance, Labour activists told him that he had sold his soul and pledged his allegiance to Zion. Others asked if he “eats children”. In another instance, a constituent told him that he would not vote for him because “I don’t trust anything to do with the Jews.” Mr Largan commented: “Several people have said on the doorstep, ‘oh, you’re the Jewish guy aren’t you? Someone seems to be going around saying that I’m Jewish. It is bizarre because I’m not even Jewish. But members of the local Labour Party seem to think I am. Perhaps because I come from north Manchester, which has a high Jewish population, and I’ve been very vocal against antisemitism.”

Mr Largan defeated incumbent Labour MP Ruth George, who has been involved in two incidents of dissemination of antisemitic discourse, for which she has apologised.

France’s leading left-wing politician, Jean-Luc Melenchon, has weighed in on the UK’s general election, claiming that one of the reasons that Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn lost the election was “baseless accusations of antisemitism” and “the various influence networks of the Likud”, Israel’s ruling party.

Mr Melenchon published his analysis in French on Facebook, where it caused a firestorm. He wrote: “Corbyn spent his time being insulted and stabbed in the back by a handful of Blairite MPs. Instead of fighting back, he restrained himself. He had to face the crude and baseless accusation of antisemitism levelled by the Chief Rabbi of England and the various influence networks of the Likud (the far-right party of Netanyahu in Israel). Instead of fighting back, he spent his time apologising and giving assurances. In both cases he showed a weakness which worried the public.”

Mr Melenchon’s ignorant and outrageous assertions come after Campaign Against Antisemitism warned that Jews may be made a scapegoat for Mr Corbyn’s election defeat.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Lord Mann, the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism, announced that he intends to launch an investigation into The Canary and other hard Left websites in relation to the rise in antisemitism.

The peer wrote on Twitter on Friday morning: “I can this morning announce that as government advisor on antisemitism that I will be instigating an investigation this January  into the role of the Canary and other websites in the growth of antisemitism in the United Kingdom.”

He was responding to a tweet by The Canary’s editor accusing a Jewish Guardian columnist of “manufacturing” the result of the general election. Its editor has been a staunch defender of the Labour leadership and disgraced MP, Chris Williamson.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right.

Eighty-eight members of the House of Lords have published a letter in The Daily Telegraph condemning remarks on Facebook by the disgraced peer, Jenny Tonge, following the general election.

Baroness Tonge posted on Facebook an article detailing the Simon Wiesenthal’s labelling of Jeremy Corbyn as the world’s worst antisemite and commented, alluding also to the Chief Rabbi’s unprecedented intervention in the election: “The Chief RabbI must be dancing in the street. The pro-Israel lobby won our General Election by lying about Jeremy Corbyn.”

In their letter, the peers wrote: “We believe that members of the House of Lords are required to conform to the highest standards of public life. The use of language by Baroness Tonge in a published statement that the general election outcome was a result of “the pro-Israeli lobby … lying about Jeremy Corbyn” falls well short of that high standard.

“Her language is both shameful and in clear contravention of Britain’s adoption of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition of antisemitism [also known as the International Definition of Antisemitism]. Baroness Tonge has brought Parliament into disrepute and we demand that she withdraws her remarks and issues a full and unqualified apology without delay.”

The letter was endorsed by inter alia Lord Pickles (the UK’s Special Envoy for Post-Holocaust Issues), Lord Mann (the Government’s Independent Advisor on Antisemitism), Baroness Deech, Lord Young, Lord Pannick, Lord Levy and Lord Mendelsohn, with almost ninety peers signing in total.

Baroness Tonge, who was suspended from the Liberal Democrats before eventually resigning, has a long history of Jew-baiting, denouncing Campaign Against Antisemitism, suggesting that the antisemitic attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue might be Israel’s fault, blaming Israel for a rise in antisemitism, and sharing a cartoon comparing Israel’s policies to those of the Nazis, which is a breach of the International Definition.

The letter comes after Campaign Against Antisemitism warned that Jews may be made a scapegoat for Mr Corbyn’s election defeat.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

Since we first exposed Jeremy Corbyn’s past, we have been at the forefront of putting antisemitism in the Labour Party under the spotlight and holding the antisemites to account.

We have heard from so many British Jews that as voting took place on Thursday, they felt a knot in their stomachs, wondering whether their countrymen were about to elect Mr Corbyn, who is an antisemite, as their Prime Minister. Many were doubting their future in this country; that is how high the stakes were.

Since 2015, Campaign Against Antisemitism has led the fight to bring antisemitism in the Labour Party to light and ensure that the media covered it. We made the referral and legal representation that caused the Equality and Human Rights Commission to open a full statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party, in which we are the complainant. We have also secured the only arrests of Labour activists over antisemitism. To this day, we remain the only major organisation to call Mr Corbyn an antisemite, and we called the Labour Party institutionally antisemitic years before anybody else. Some have vilified us and accused us of scaremongering, but others have proved to be invaluable allies.

After years of exposing antisemitism in politics, in just the past two weeks Campaign Against Antisemitism published a detailed study with King’s College London exposing the extent of antisemitic views on the far-left and amongst Mr Corbyn’s strongest supporters, released detailed case files on antisemitic parliamentary candidates across all political parties, including Mr Corbyn himself, and gathered 3,200 Jews and non-Jews alike in Parliament Square at our star-studded #TogetherAgainstAntisemitism rally to stand with British Jews.

While many in the Jewish community have doubted that the British public cared about antisemitism, Campaign Against Antisemitism has for some time seen indications that British people are deeply disgusted by Jew-hatred. Polling data suggests that antisemitism was a significant factor in the resounding defeat of the Labour Party.

However, now is not the time to rest on our laurels.

Antisemitism in politics is not vanquished. Antisemitism on campuses remains commonplace. Incitement against Jews online and antisemitic intimidation and violence on the streets are growing. In 2020, Campaign Against Antisemitism will focus on three areas.

The first area is antisemitism in politics. The Labour Party will be changing its leadership, but the Party itself remains institutionally antisemitic and many of those whose failures led to the antisemitism crisis under Jeremy Corbyn will still hold positions of power. Now is the time for Campaign Against Antisemitism to redouble its efforts to tackle antisemitism in politics, including other political parties which are not without their problems, albeit not on the scale of Labour’s crisis. Campaign Against Antisemitism’s highly-experienced Political and Government Investigations Unit will be continuing its work to expose, document and highlight antisemitism in political parties. We will also continue in our role as complainant in the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s statutory investigation into antisemitism in the Labour Party, and to ensure that antisemitic political activists are prosecuted.

The second area is antisemitism on campus. Antisemitism at universities has long been a major focus for Campaign Against Antisemitism, however in the coming year we will elevate it to one of our three major national strategic priorities, which will involve an expansion of our work to gather evidence from universities around the country, a major analysis project to understand what universities have in fact been doing to combat antisemitism (generally much too little), and investing in litigation to force universities to defend their Jewish students. We believe that university campuses have long been an incubator for antisemitism, and that students often acquire antisemitic beliefs at university and then bring those beliefs out into other arenas when they graduate, infecting political parties, for example.

The third area is antisemitic crime online and on the streets. Campaign Against Antisemitism was founded in response to surging antisemitic crime just over five years ago, and despite landmark legal successes which have involved everything from private prosecution to judicial review, the Crown Prosecution Service is still failing to adequately prosecute antisemitic incitement online, and we are also very concerned about its approach to antisemitic hate crime on the streets. We intend to build on our legal successes by bringing more cases. The incitement by antisemites and their apparent impunity is emboldening growing numbers of racists to criminally target British Jews. We must ensure that the authorities act, and deter the antisemites.

We need your help.

In order to accomplish our goals in 2020, we must raise a significant litigation fund. That is because the only part of our programme that is not funded is the litigation. Whereas we receive the help of extremely accomplished lawyers on a pro bono basis, there is only so much work they can take on. We need an in-house lawyer to assist them by taking on much of the legwork on cases so that we can bring more actions.

2020 is the year that we must build on our successes and turn the tables on antisemites in this country. We need your support to succeed, and that is why we are asking that everyone donates towards our litigation fund. We are raising money to pay the salaries of a full-time lawyer and paralegal, as well as court and insurance fees. Together, these costs are substantial, and they will be ongoing.

Please give what you can online, contact us to set up a standing order or to make a large donation, or volunteer to help us to fundraise.

Relief in the Jewish community is palpable after the country resoundingly rejected the politics of hate.

Conservative frontbencher Michael Gove gave a powerful reassurance to the Jewish community this morning, declaring that Britain has “comprehensively rejected Jeremy Corbyn’s politics of division, extremism and antisemitism”, adding that “I also want to say something to a very special group of people: our Jewish friends and neighbours. You have had to live in fear for months now, concerned that we would have a Prime Minister who trafficked in anti-Jewish rhetoric and embraced anti-Jewish terrorists. You should never have to live in fear again.” The clip can be watched below.

In his statement, Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Not for the first time, our nation has stood firm against antisemitism. The British public has watched the once proudly anti-racist Labour Party become infested with Jew-hatred and it has resoundingly decided to stand with its Jewish community and give the antisemites a crushing rebuke. The faith that British Jews showed in our country has been vindicated.”

The historian Simon Sebag Montefiore, speaks for many when he says: “ Britain has spoken and it is the decent country we prayed it was. For Jews its nightmare [has been] redeemed. We so appreciate you non-Jews who dared support us. Thank you.”

From abroad, the ADL’s Jonathan Greenblatt expressed his pleasure at the rejection of Mr Corbyn’s “ugly antisemitism”. He regretted that certain American politicians had endorsed Mr Corbyn, but added: “Let’s hope this will push him from centre stage and drain the hate out of British politics, let alone the rest of the world.”

However, the Chief Rabbi, whose courageous intervention two weeks ago articulated the concerns of the Jewish community, rightly noted that “The election may be over, but concerns about the resurgence of antisemitism very much remain,” echoing fears expressed by Campaign Against Antisemitism.

Joan Ryan, one of those brave few former Labour MPs who resigned from the Party over antisemitism, wrote last night: “If exit poll confirmed it shows Britain rejects antisemitism extremism and Corbyn. British people [are] fundamentally decent, democratic and moderate.”

Chris Williamson, the disgraced former Labour MP and prominent Jew-baiter, not only lost his independent bid to return to Parliament, but was rejected by voters so overwhelmingly that he has reportedly lost the deposit that candidates must all pay and which is only refunded if they receive more than 5 percent of votes cast.

The unanimity of the Jewish reaction also underscores the negligibility of the fringe minority of Jewish apologists for Mr Corbyn. They never spoke for the Jewish community — and they should not be perceived to do so.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which is equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament account for 82 percent of all incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

Over the past several years, the Jewish community has watched the descent of the Labour Party into abject racism with horror. The Party twice elected an antisemitic leader and subjected the nation to a racist Leader of the Opposition. Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, Labour has become institutionally antisemitic, defending antisemites and victimising those who stood up to them, cultivating animosity towards Jews at all levels and hounding out of the Party Jewish MPs and the most decent of their colleagues. This week saw yet more brazenly antisemitic displays by Mr Corbyn’s supporters.

Political developments appear to indicate that Mr Corbyn will not remain as leader of the Labour Party for long. At this time, we urge the Jewish community to be vigilant in case, as has happened so often in Jewish history and as the last few years and months foretell, the Jews may become a scapegoat as the more ardent of Mr Corbyn’s followers, many of whom hold antisemitic views, now search for where to cast the blame.

As to the Labour Party itself, two factions now exist within the parliamentary party: the first comprises those who support Mr Corbyn’s views towards Jews, including a cohort of new MPs; the second includes those who do not share his positions but who were nonetheless prepared to campaign for an antisemite to become Prime Minister. If the Labour Party wishes to begin to repair itself — an endeavour that will doubtless take some years — it is hard to see how either group could be trusted to lead that process.

That is why the involvement of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) — an invention of the once fiercely anti-racist Labour Party — is so crucial. The EHRC continues with its full statutory investigation of the Party, which it launched on 28th May following detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, and as complainant, we are meeting with the EHRC again today. We expect that the EHRC’s findings will in due course provide a legally-enforceable action plan for Labour to navigate its way back to respectability.

Over these past few years, the Jewish community has learned a lot about our country. It has learned who its true friends are — the many — and it has identified the few upon whom it cannot rely when tough decisions need to be made: those who say all the right things but decline to match their words with action.

However, the Jewish community has discovered that a portion of its fellow citizens maintain an ill-disposition towards Jews and that a significant segment of the population is indifferent to Jewish concerns and plight. But it has also seen tremendous goodwill towards Jewry throughout the country, and for that, our small Jewish minority is profoundly grateful.

Whether a change in Labour’s leadership comes to represent a new chapter in the Party’s — and our country’s — story remains to be seen. But Campaign Against Antisemitism will continue to do its work exposing and combating antisemitism in all political parties and across society, and we will continue to rely on your support to do so.

Gideon Falter, Chief Executive of Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: “Not for the first time, our nation has stood firm against antisemitism. The British public has watched the once proudly anti-racist Labour Party become infested with Jew-hatred and it has resoundingly decided to stand with its Jewish community and give the antisemites a crushing rebuke. The faith that British Jews showed in our country has been vindicated.

“We urgently need to return to a time when antisemitism had no place in our politics. We must not allow ourselves to forget the fear that many British Jews felt yesterday when a Jeremy Corbyn premiership remained a possibility. Firm action must now be taken against antisemites in politics and those who enabled them, but an antisemite cannot be trusted to rid the Labour Party of this evil. The next Labour leader must be someone who has not been implicated in this crisis and we will hold them to account. They will need to comply with the Equality and Human Rights Commission when it releases its recommendations and, as the complainant in the Commission’s statutory investigation into Labour antisemitism, we will be meeting them today.”

Britain has resoundingly rejected the politics of hate, albeit that millions still backed an institutionally antisemitic political party. However, the Jewish community must now brace itself for a potential backlash.

Campaign Against Antisemitism has urged the Jewish community to be vigilant in case, as has happened so often in Jewish history and as the last few years and months foretell, the Jews may become a scapegoat as the more ardent of Mr Corbyn’s followers, many of whom hold antisemitic views, now search for where to cast the blame.

As the Chief Rabbi, whose courageous intervention two weeks ago articulated the concerns of the Jewish community, has also noted: “The election may be over, but concerns about the resurgence of antisemitism very much remain.”

While votes were still being counted, notorious Jew-baiter Ken Livingstone already reportedly noted that “The Jewish vote wasn’t very helpful”.

Labour frontbencher Dan Carden also claimed that Jeremy Corbyn is “one of the most attacked and smeared leaders of a party we’ve ever had in this country.”

Asa Winstanley, who called the Jewish Labour Movement (JLM) an “Israeli Embassy proxy” and was reportedly suspended from Labour in March, pending an investigation, observed: “The manufactured ‘antisemitism crisis’ spreads from Labour to a state-backed McCarthyist witch hunt. It was a fatal mistake to indulge these lies, and indulge liars like [former MP] John Mann [the Government’s independent antisemitism advisor].”

Meanwhile, a perusal of Twitter reveals how some frustration with the result is finding expression in worrying tropes, for example a journalist at the Irish Times describing the election as a “great result for Zionism: monsters are roaring their delight”.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which is equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament account for 82 percent of all incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

A Deltapoll commissioned shortly before the election found that 16 percent of 2017 Labour voters were wavering about voting for the Labour Party again because of antisemitism.

The fieldwork, with a very large sample size of 12,147 in England, Scotland and Wales, was carried out by Deltapoll from 29th November to 2nd December.

Among all 2017 Labour voters who said that they were “less than certain to vote Labour”, 16 percent gave antisemitism as a reason. 28 percent said they would have been more likely to vote Labour if Jeremy Corbyn had handled accusations of antisemitism better.

Among all adults, regardless of political persuasion, 47 percent felt that “generally speaking, Labour does have a problem with antisemitism”. 46 percent thought a different Labour Party leader would have handled accusations of antisemitism within the Labour Party better.

81 percent had seen news coverage of antisemitism in the Labour Party ahead of the election, with 37 percent saying they had seen “a lot” and 44 percent saying they had seen “a little”.

Read in conjunction with a separate poll by Opinium, it suggests that antisemitism may have been a factor that drove traditional Labour voters to defect to the Conservatives or the Liberal Democrats. Opinium’s poll found that 37 percent of voters who did not vote for the Labour but who previously did vote for Labour defected to another political party due to the Labour Party’s leadership, whereas only 27 percent defected over its policies on Brexit and the economy. This adds credence to the thesis that traditional voters were swayed in part to vote for another party because they felt that the leadership of the Labour Party was antisemitic or had failed to address antisemitism.

In the first release of its Antisemitism in Political Parties research, Campaign Against Antisemitism has shown that Jeremy Corbyn is personally responsible for 24 incidents of antisemitic discourse, which is equal to fifteen percent of all recorded incidents involving parliamentary candidates and party leaders. Overall, Labour Party candidates for Parliament account for 82 percent of all incidents.

Campaign Against Antisemitism’s Antisemitism Barometer 2019 showed that antisemitism on the far-left of British politics has surpassed that of the far-right, and that Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is the party leader of choice for those who hold multiple antisemitic views.

On 28th May, the Equality and Human Rights Commission launched a full statutory investigation following a formal referral and detailed legal representations from Campaign Against Antisemitism, which is the complainant.

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Campaign Against Antisemitism is a volunteer-led charity dedicated to exposing and countering antisemitism through education and zero-tolerance enforcement of the law. Everything that we do is done by people who volunteer their time, using donations contributed by members of the public. Join the fight against antisemitism by subscribing to our updates, volunteering, or donating.

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